Bit of cleaning up in the byte dumping part. Making use of any remaining bit(s)
[opus.git] / libcelt / mfrngdec.c
1 #include <stddef.h>
2 #include "entdec.h"
3 #include "mfrngcod.h"
4
5
6
7 /*A multiply-free range decoder.
8   This is an entropy decoder based upon \cite{Mar79}, which is itself a
9    rediscovery of the FIFO arithmetic code introduced by \cite{Pas76}.
10   It is very similar to arithmetic encoding, except that encoding is done with
11    digits in any base, instead of with bits, and so it is faster when using
12    larger bases (i.e.: a byte).
13   The author claims an average waste of $\frac{1}{2}\log_b(2b)$ bits, where $b$
14    is the base, longer than the theoretical optimum, but to my knowledge there
15    is no published justification for this claim.
16   This only seems true when using near-infinite precision arithmetic so that
17    the process is carried out with no rounding errors.
18
19   IBM (the author's employer) never sought to patent the idea, and to my
20    knowledge the algorithm is unencumbered by any patents, though its
21    performance is very competitive with proprietary arithmetic coding.
22   The two are based on very similar ideas, however.
23   An excellent description of implementation details is available at
24    http://www.arturocampos.com/ac_range.html
25   A recent work \cite{MNW98} which proposes several changes to arithmetic
26    encoding for efficiency actually re-discovers many of the principles
27    behind range encoding, and presents a good theoretical analysis of them.
28
29   The coder is made multiply-free by replacing the standard multiply/divide
30    used to partition the current interval according to the total frequency
31    count.
32   The new partition function scales the count so that it differs from the size
33    of the interval by no more than a factor of two and then assigns each symbol
34    one or two code words in the interval.
35   For details see \cite{SM98}.
36
37   This coder also handles the end of the stream in a slightly more graceful
38    fashion than most arithmetic or range coders.
39   Once the final symbol has been encoded, the coder selects the code word with
40    the shortest number of bits that still falls within the final interval.
41   This method is not novel.
42   Here, by the length of the code word, we refer to the number of bits until
43    its final 1.
44   Any trailing zeros may be discarded, since the encoder, once it runs out of
45    input, will pad its buffer with zeros.
46
47   But this means that no encoded stream would ever have any zero bytes at the
48    end.
49   Since there are some coded representations we cannot produce, it implies that
50    there is still some redundancy in the stream.
51   In this case, we can pick a special byte value, RSV1, and should the stream
52    end in a sequence of zeros, followed by the RSV1 byte, we can code the
53    zeros, and discard the RSV1 byte.
54   The decoder, knowing that the encoder would never produce a sequence of zeros
55    at the end, would then know to add in the RSV1 byte if it observed it.
56
57   Now, the encoder would never produce a stream that ended in a sequence of
58    zeros followed by a RSV1 byte.
59   So, if the stream ends in a non-empty sequence of zeros, followed by any
60    positive number of RSV1 bytes, the last RSV1 byte is discarded.
61   The decoder, if it encounters a stream that ends in non-empty sequence of
62    zeros followed by any non-negative number of RSV1 bytes, adds an additional
63    RSV1 byte to the stream.
64   With this strategy, every possible sequence of input bytes is transformed to
65    one that could actually be produced by the encoder.
66
67   The only question is what non-zero value to use for RSV1.
68   We select 0x80, since it has the nice property of producing the shortest
69    possible byte streams when using our strategy for selecting a number within
70    the final interval to encode.
71   Clearly if the shortest possible code word that falls within the interval has
72    its last one bit as the most significant bit of the final byte, and the
73    previous bytes were a non-empty sequence of zeros followed by a non-negative
74    number of 0x80 bytes, then the last byte would be discarded.
75   If the shortest code word is not so formed, then no other code word in the
76    interval would result in any more bytes being discarded.
77   Any longer code word would have an additional one bit somewhere, and so would
78    require at a minimum that that byte would be coded.
79   If the shortest code word has a 1 before the final one that is preventing the
80    stream from ending in a non-empty sequence of zeros followed by a
81    non-negative number of 0x80's, then there is no code word of the same length
82    which contains that bit as a zero.
83   If there were, then we could simply leave that bit a 1, and drop all the bits
84    after it without leaving the interval, thus producing a shorter code word.
85
86   In this case, RSV1 can only drop 1 bit off the final stream.
87   Other choices could lead to savings of up to 8 bits for particular streams,
88    but this would produce the odd situation that a stream with more non-zero
89    bits is actually encoded in fewer bytes.
90
91   @PHDTHESIS{Pas76,
92     author="Richard Clark Pasco",
93     title="Source coding algorithms for fast data compression",
94     school="Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University",
95     address="Stanford, CA",
96     month=May,
97     year=1976
98   }
99   @INPROCEEDINGS{Mar79,
100    author="Martin, G.N.N.",
101    title="Range encoding: an algorithm for removing redundancy from a digitised
102     message",
103    booktitle="Video & Data Recording Conference",
104    year=1979,
105    address="Southampton",
106    month=Jul
107   }
108   @ARTICLE{MNW98,
109    author="Alistair Moffat and Radford Neal and Ian H. Witten",
110    title="Arithmetic Coding Revisited",
111    journal="{ACM} Transactions on Information Systems",
112    year=1998,
113    volume=16,
114    number=3,
115    pages="256--294",
116    month=Jul,
117    URL="http://www.stanford.edu/class/ee398/handouts/papers/Moffat98ArithmCoding.pdf"
118   }
119   @INPROCEEDINGS{SM98,
120    author="Lang Stuiver and Alistair Moffat",
121    title="Piecewise Integer Mapping for Arithmetic Coding",
122    booktitle="Proceedings of the {IEEE} Data Compression Conference",
123    pages="1--10",
124    address="Snowbird, UT",
125    month="Mar./Apr.",
126    year=1998
127   }*/
128
129
130
131 /*Gets the next byte of input.
132   After all the bytes in the current packet have been consumed, and the extra
133    end code returned if needed, this function will continue to return zero each
134    time it is called.
135   Return: The next byte of input.*/
136 static int ec_dec_in(ec_dec *_this){
137   int ret;
138   ret=ec_byte_read1(_this->buf);
139   if(ret<0){
140     ret=0;
141     /*Needed to make sure the above conditional only triggers once, and to keep
142        oc_dec_tell() operating correctly.*/
143     ec_byte_adv1(_this->buf);
144   }
145   return ret;
146 }
147
148 /*Normalizes the contents of dif and rng so that rng lies entirely in the
149    high-order symbol.*/
150 static void ec_dec_normalize(ec_dec *_this){
151   /*If the range is too small, rescale it and input some bits.*/
152   while(_this->rng<=EC_CODE_BOT){
153     int sym;
154     _this->rng<<=EC_SYM_BITS;
155     /*Use up the remaining bits from our last symbol.*/
156     sym=_this->rem<<EC_CODE_EXTRA&EC_SYM_MAX;
157     /*Read the next value from the input.*/
158     _this->rem=ec_dec_in(_this);
159     /*Take the rest of the bits we need from this new symbol.*/
160     sym|=_this->rem>>EC_SYM_BITS-EC_CODE_EXTRA;
161     _this->dif=(_this->dif<<EC_SYM_BITS)+sym&EC_CODE_MASK;
162     /*dif can never be larger than EC_CODE_TOP.
163       This is equivalent to the slightly more readable:
164       if(_this->dif>EC_CODE_TOP)_this->dif-=EC_CODE_TOP;*/
165     _this->dif^=_this->dif&_this->dif-1&EC_CODE_TOP;
166   }
167 }
168
169 void ec_dec_init(ec_dec *_this,ec_byte_buffer *_buf){
170   _this->buf=_buf;
171   _this->rem=ec_dec_in(_this);
172   _this->rng=1U<<EC_CODE_EXTRA;
173   _this->dif=_this->rem>>EC_SYM_BITS-EC_CODE_EXTRA;
174   /*Normalize the interval.*/
175   ec_dec_normalize(_this);
176 }
177
178 unsigned ec_decode(ec_dec *_this,unsigned _ft){
179   unsigned d;
180   /*Step 1: Compute the normalization factor for the frequency counts.*/
181   _this->nrm=EC_ILOG(_this->rng)-EC_ILOG(_ft);
182   _ft<<=_this->nrm;
183   d=_ft>_this->rng;
184   _ft>>=d;
185   _this->nrm-=d;
186   /*Step 2: invert the partition function.*/
187   d=_this->rng-_ft;
188   return EC_MAXI((int)(_this->dif>>1),(int)(_this->dif-d))>>_this->nrm;
189   /*Step 3: The caller locates the range [fl,fh) containing the return value
190      and calls ec_dec_update().*/
191 }
192
193 void ec_dec_update(ec_dec *_this,unsigned _fl,unsigned _fh,unsigned _ft){
194   unsigned r;
195   unsigned s;
196   unsigned d;
197   /*Step 4: Evaluate the two partition function values.*/
198   _fl<<=_this->nrm;
199   _fh<<=_this->nrm;
200   _ft<<=_this->nrm;
201   d=_this->rng-_ft;
202   r=_fh+EC_MINI(_fh,d);
203   s=_fl+EC_MINI(_fl,d);
204   /*Step 5: Update the interval.*/
205   _this->rng=r-s;
206   _this->dif-=s;
207   /*Step 6: Normalize the interval.*/
208   ec_dec_normalize(_this);
209 }
210
211 long ec_dec_tell(ec_dec *_this,int _b){
212   ec_uint32 r;
213   int       l;
214   long      nbits;
215   nbits=ec_byte_bytes(_this->buf)-(EC_CODE_BITS+EC_SYM_BITS-1)/EC_SYM_BITS<<3;
216   /*To handle the non-integral number of bits still left in the encoder state,
217      we compute the number of bits of low that must be encoded to ensure that
218      the value is inside the range for any possible subsequent bits.
219     Note that this is subtly different than the actual value we would end the
220      stream with, which tries to make as many of the trailing bits zeros as
221      possible.*/
222   nbits+=EC_CODE_BITS;
223   nbits<<=_b;
224   l=EC_ILOG(_this->rng);
225   r=_this->rng>>l-16;
226   while(_b-->0){
227     int b;
228     r=r*r>>15;
229     b=(int)(r>>16);
230     l=l<<1|b;
231     r>>=b;
232   }
233   return nbits-l;
234 }
235
236 #if 0
237 int ec_dec_done(ec_dec *_this){
238   unsigned low;
239   int      ret;
240   /*Check to make sure we've used all the input bytes.
241     This ensures that no more ones would ever be inserted into the decoder.*/
242   if(_this->buf->ptr-ec_byte_get_buffer(_this->buf)<=
243    ec_byte_bytes(_this->buf)){
244     return 0;
245   }
246   /*We compute the smallest finitely odd fraction that fits inside the current
247      range, and write that to the stream.
248     This is guaranteed to yield the smallest possible encoding.*/
249   /*TODO: Fix this line, as it is wrong.
250     It doesn't seem worth being able to make this check to do an extra
251      subtraction for every symbol decoded.*/
252   low=/*What we want: _this->top-_this->rng; What we have:*/_this->dif
253   if(low){
254     unsigned end;
255     end=EC_CODE_TOP;
256     /*Ensure that the next free end is in the range.*/
257     if(end-low>=_this->rng){
258       unsigned msk;
259       msk=EC_CODE_TOP-1;
260       do{
261         msk>>=1;
262         end=low+msk&~msk|msk+1;
263       }
264       while(end-low>=_this->rng);
265     }
266     /*The remaining input should have been the next free end.*/
267     return end-low!=_this->dif;
268   }
269   return 1;
270 }
271 #endif