d5615e093731255a32012aaf9ce8aac1508cd2de
[opus.git] / doc / draft-ietf-codec-opus.xml
1 <?xml version='1.0'?>
2 <!DOCTYPE rfc SYSTEM 'rfc2629.dtd'>
3 <?rfc toc="yes" symrefs="yes" ?>
4
5 <rfc ipr="trust200902" category="std" docName="draft-ietf-codec-opus-02">
6
7 <front>
8 <title abbrev="Interactive Audio Codec">Definition of the Opus Audio Codec</title>
9
10
11 <author initials="JM" surname="Valin" fullname="Jean-Marc Valin">
12 <organization>Octasic Inc.</organization>
13 <address>
14 <postal>
15 <street>4101, Molson Street</street>
16 <city>Montreal</city>
17 <region>Quebec</region>
18 <code></code>
19 <country>Canada</country>
20 </postal>
21 <phone>+1 514 282-8858</phone>
22 <email>jean-marc.valin@octasic.com</email>
23 </address>
24 </author>
25
26 <author initials="K." surname="Vos" fullname="Koen Vos">
27 <organization>Skype Technologies S.A.</organization>
28 <address>
29 <postal>
30 <street>Stadsgarden 6</street>
31 <city>Stockholm</city>
32 <region></region>
33 <code>11645</code>
34 <country>SE</country>
35 </postal>
36 <phone>+46 855 921 989</phone>
37 <email>koen.vos@skype.net</email>
38 </address>
39 </author>
40
41
42 <date day="4" month="February" year="2011" />
43
44 <area>General</area>
45
46 <workgroup></workgroup>
47
48 <abstract>
49 <t>
50 This document describes the Opus codec, designed for interactive speech and audio 
51 transmission over the Internet.
52 </t>
53 </abstract>
54 </front>
55
56 <middle>
57
58 <section anchor="introduction" title="Introduction">
59 <t>
60 We propose the Opus codec based on a linear prediction layer (LP) and an
61 MDCT-based enhancement layer. The main idea behind the proposal is that
62 the speech low frequencies are usually more efficiently coded using
63 linear prediction codecs (such as CELP variants), while the higher frequencies
64 are more efficiently coded in the transform domain (e.g. MDCT). For low 
65 sampling rates, the MDCT layer is not useful and only the LP-based layer is
66 used. On the other hand, non-speech signals are not always adequately coded
67 using linear prediction, so for music only the MDCT-based layer is used.
68 </t>
69
70 <t>
71 In this proposed prototype, the LP layer is based on the 
72 <eref target='http://developer.skype.com/silk'>SILK</eref> codec 
73 <xref target="SILK"></xref> and the MDCT layer is based on the 
74 <eref target='http://www.celt-codec.org/'>CELT</eref>  codec
75  <xref target="CELT"></xref>.
76 </t>
77
78 <t>This is a work in progress.</t>
79 </section>
80
81 <section anchor="hybrid" title="Opus Codec">
82
83 <t>
84 In hybrid mode, each frame is coded first by the LP layer and then by the MDCT 
85 layer. In the current prototype, the cutoff frequency is 8 kHz. In the MDCT
86 layer, all bands below 8 kHz are discarded, such that there is no coding
87 redundancy between the two layers. Also both layers use the same instance of 
88 the range coder to encode the signal, which ensures that no "padding bits" are
89 wasted. The hybrid approach makes it easy to support both constant bit-rate
90 (CBR) and varaible bit-rate (VBR) coding. Although the SILK layer used is VBR,
91 it is easy to make the bit allocation of the CELT layer produce a final stream
92 that is CBR by using all the bits left unused by the SILK layer.
93 </t>
94
95 <t>The implementation of SILK-based LP layer is similar to the description in
96 the <xref target="SILK">SILK Internet-Draft</xref> with the main exception that 
97 SILK was modified to 
98 use the same range coder as CELT. The implementation of the CELT-based MDCT
99 layer is available from the CELT website and is a more recent version (0.8.1) 
100 of the <xref target="CELT">CELT Internet-Draft</xref>. 
101 The main changes
102 include better support for 20 ms frames as well as the ability to encode 
103 only the higher bands using a range coder partially filled by the SILK layer.</t>
104
105 <t>
106 In addition to their frame size, the SILK and CELT codecs require
107 a look-ahead of 5.2 ms and 2.5 ms, respectively. SILK's look-ahead is due to
108 noise shaping estimation (5 ms) and the internal resampling (0.2 ms), while
109 CELT's look-ahead is due to the overlapping MDCT windows. To compensate for the
110 difference, the CELT encoder input is delayed by 2.7 ms. This ensures that low
111 frequencies and high frequencies arrive at the same time.
112 </t>
113
114
115 <section title="Source Code">
116 <t>
117 The source code is currently available in a
118 <eref target='git://git.xiph.org/users/jm/ietfcodec.git'>Git repository</eref> 
119 which references two other
120 repositories (for SILK and CELT). Some snapshots are provided for 
121 convenience at <eref target='http://people.xiph.org/~jm/ietfcodec/'/> along
122 with sample files.
123 Although the build system is very primitive, some instructions are provided 
124 in the toplevel README file.
125 This is very early development so both the quality and feature set should
126 greatly improve over time. In the current version, only 48 kHz audio is 
127 supported, but support for all configurations listed in 
128 <xref target="modes"></xref> is planned. 
129 </t>
130 </section>
131
132 </section>
133
134 <section anchor="modes" title="Codec Modes">
135 <t>
136 There are three possible operating modes for the proposed prototype:
137 <list style="numbers">
138 <t>A linear prediction (LP) mode for use in low bit-rate connections with up to 8 kHz audio bandwidth (16 kHz sampling rate)</t>
139 <t>A hybrid (LP+MDCT) mode for full-bandwidth speech at medium bitrates</t>
140 <t>An MDCT-only mode for very low delay speech transmission as well as music transmission.</t>
141 </list>
142 Each of these modes supports a number of difference frame sizes and sampling
143 rates. In order to distinguish between the various modes and configurations,
144 we define a single-byte table-of-contents (TOC) header that can used in the transport layer 
145 (e.g RTP) to signal this information. The following describes the proposed
146 TOC byte.
147 </t>
148
149 <t>
150 The LP mode supports the following configurations (numbered from 0 to 11):
151 <list style="symbols">
152 <t>8 kHz:  10, 20, 40, 60 ms (0..3)</t>
153 <t>12 kHz: 10, 20, 40, 60 ms (4..7)</t>
154 <t>16 kHz: 10, 20, 40, 60 ms (8..11)</t>
155 </list>
156 for a total of 12 configurations.
157 </t>
158
159 <t>
160 The hybrid mode supports the following configurations (numbered from 12 to 15):
161 <list style="symbols">
162 <t>32 kHz: 10, 20 ms (12..13)</t>
163 <t>48 kHz: 10, 20 ms (14..15)</t>
164 </list>
165 for a total of 4 configurations.
166 </t>
167
168 <t>
169 The MDCT-only mode supports the following configurations (numbered from 16 to 31):
170 <list style="symbols">
171 <t>8 kHz:  2.5, 5, 10, 20 ms (16..19)</t>
172 <t>16 kHz: 2.5, 5, 10, 20 ms (20..23)</t>
173 <t>32 kHz: 2.5, 5, 10, 20 ms (24..27)</t>
174 <t>48 kHz: 2.5, 5, 10, 20 ms (28..31)</t>
175 </list>
176 for a total of 16 configurations.
177 </t>
178
179 <t>
180 There is thus a total of 32 configurations, encoded in 5 bits. On bit is used to signal mono vs stereo, which leaves 2 bits for the number of frames per packets (codes 0 to 3):
181 <list style="symbols">
182 <t>0:    1 frames in the packet</t>
183 <t>1:    2 frames in the packet, each with equal compressed size</t>
184 <t>2:    2 frames in the packet, with different compressed size</t>
185 <t>3:    arbitrary number of frames in the packet</t>
186 </list>
187 For code 2, the TOC byte is followed by the length of the first frame, encoded as described below.
188 For code 3, the TOC byte is followed by a byte encoding the number of frames in the packet, with the MSB indicating VBR. In the VBR case, the byte indicating the number of frames is followed by N-1 frame 
189 lengths encoded as described below. As an additional limit, the audio duration contained
190 within a packet may not exceed 120 ms.
191 </t>
192
193 <t>
194 The compressed size of the frames (if needed) is indicated -- usually -- with one byte, with the following meaning:
195 <list style="symbols">
196 <t>0:          No frame (DTX or lost packet)</t>
197 <t>1-251:      Size of the frame in bytes</t>
198 <t>252-255:    A second byte is needed. The total size is (size[1]*4)+size[0]</t>
199 </list>
200 </t>
201
202 <t>
203 The maximum size representable is 255*4+255=1275 bytes. For 20 ms frames, that 
204 represents a bit-rate of 510 kb/s, which is really the highest rate anyone would want 
205 to use in stereo mode (beyond that point, lossless codecs would be more appropriate).
206 </t>
207
208 <section anchor="examples" title="Examples">
209 <t>
210 Simplest case: one narrowband mono 20-ms SILK frame
211 </t>
212
213 <t>
214 <figure>
215 <artwork><![CDATA[
216  0                   1                   2                   3
217  0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
218 +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
219 |    1    |0|0|0|               compressed data...              |
220 +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
221 ]]></artwork>
222 </figure>
223 </t>
224
225 <t>
226 Two 48 kHz mono 5 ms CELT frames of the same compressed size:
227 </t>
228
229 <t>
230 <figure>
231 <artwork><![CDATA[
232  0                   1                   2                   3
233  0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
234 +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
235 |    29   |0|0|1|               compressed data...              |
236 +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
237 ]]></artwork>
238 </figure>
239 </t>
240
241 <t>
242 Two 48 kHz mono 20-ms hybrid frames of different compressed size:
243 </t>
244
245 <t>
246 <figure>
247 <artwork><![CDATA[
248  0                   1                   2                   3
249  0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
250 +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
251 |    15   |0|1|1|       2       |   frame size  |compressed data|
252 +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
253 |                       compressed data...                      |
254 +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
255 ]]></artwork>
256 </figure>
257 </t>
258
259 <t>
260 Four 48 kHz stereo 20-ms CELT frame of the same compressed size:
261
262 </t>
263
264 <t>
265 <figure>
266 <artwork><![CDATA[
267  0                   1                   2                   3
268  0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
269 +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
270 |    31   |1|1|0|       4       |      compressed data...       |
271 +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
272 ]]></artwork>
273 </figure>
274 </t>
275 </section>
276
277
278 </section>
279
280 <section title="Codec Encoder">
281 <t>
282 Opus encoder block diagram.
283 <figure>
284 <artwork>
285 ![CDATA[
286          +----------+    +-------+
287          |  sample  |    | SILK  |
288       +->|   rate   |--->|encoder|--+
289       |  |conversion|    |       |  |
290 audio |  +----------+    +-------+  |    +-------+
291 ------+                             +--->| Range |
292       |  +-------+                       |encoder|---->
293       |  | CELT  |                  +--->|       | bit-stream
294       +->|encoder|------------------+    +-------+
295          |       |
296          +-------+
297 ]]>
298 </artwork>
299 </figure>
300 </t>
301
302 <section anchor="range-encoder" title="Range Coder">
303 <t>
304 Opus uses an entropy coder based upon <xref target="range-coding"></xref>, 
305 which is itself a rediscovery of the FIFO arithmetic code introduced by <xref target="coding-thesis"></xref>.
306 It is very similar to arithmetic encoding, except that encoding is done with
307 digits in any base instead of with bits, 
308 so it is faster when using larger bases (i.e.: an octet). All of the
309 calculations in the range coder must use bit-exact integer arithmetic.
310 </t>
311
312 <t>
313 The range coder also acts as the bit-packer for Opus. It is
314 used in three different ways, to encode:
315 <list style="symbols">
316 <t>entropy-coded symbols with a fixed probability model using ec_encode(), (rangeenc.c)</t>
317 <t>integers from 0 to 2^M-1 using ec_enc_uint() or ec_enc_bits(), (entenc.c)</t>
318 <t>integers from 0 to N-1 (where N is not a power of two) using ec_enc_uint(). (entenc.c)</t>
319 </list>
320 </t>
321
322 <t>
323 The range encoder maintains an internal state vector composed of the
324 four-tuple (low,rng,rem,ext), representing the low end of the current
325 range, the size of the current range, a single buffered output octet,
326 and a count of additional carry-propagating output octets. Both rng
327 and low are 32-bit unsigned integer values, rem is an octet value or
328 the special value -1, and ext is an integer with at least 16 bits.
329 This state vector is initialized at the start of each each frame to
330 the value (0,2^31,-1,0).
331 </t>
332
333 <t>
334 Each symbol is drawn from a finite alphabet and coded in a separate
335 context which describes the size of the alphabet and the relative
336 frequency of each symbol in that alphabet. Opus only uses static
337 contexts; they are not adapted to the statistics of the data that is
338 coded.
339 </t>
340
341 <section anchor="encoding-symbols" title="Encoding Symbols">
342 <t>
343    The main encoding function is ec_encode() (rangeenc.c),
344    which takes as an argument a three-tuple (fl,fh,ft)
345    describing the range of the symbol to be encoded in the current
346    context, with 0 &lt;= fl &lt; fh &lt;= ft &lt;= 65535. The values of this tuple
347    are derived from the probability model for the symbol. Let f(i) be
348    the frequency of the ith symbol in the current context. Then the
349    three-tuple corresponding to the kth symbol is given by
350    <![CDATA[
351 fl=sum(f(i),i<k), fh=fl+f(i), and ft=sum(f(i)).
352 ]]>
353 </t>
354 <t>
355    ec_encode() updates the state of the encoder as follows. If fl is
356    greater than zero, then low = low + rng - (rng/ft)*(ft-fl) and 
357    rng = (rng/ft)*(fh-fl). Otherwise, low is unchanged and
358    rng = rng - (rng/ft)*(fh-fl). The divisions here are exact integer
359    division. After this update, the range is normalized.
360 </t>
361 <t>
362    To normalize the range, the following process is repeated until
363    rng > 2^23. First, the top 9 bits of low, (low>>23), are placed into
364    a carry buffer. Then, low is set to <![CDATA[(low << 8 & 0x7FFFFFFF) and rng
365    is set to (rng<<8)]]>. This process is carried out by
366    ec_enc_normalize() (rangeenc.c).
367 </t>
368 <t>
369    The 9 bits produced in each iteration of the normalization loop
370    consist of 8 data bits and a carry flag. The final value of the
371    output bits is not determined until carry propagation is accounted
372    for. Therefore the reference implementation buffers a single
373    (non-propagating) output octet and keeps a count of additional
374    propagating (0xFF) output octets. An implementation MAY choose to use
375    any mathematically equivalent scheme to perform carry propagation.
376 </t>
377 <t>
378    The function ec_enc_carry_out() (rangeenc.c) performs
379    this buffering. It takes a 9-bit input value, c, from the normalization
380    8-bit output and a carry bit. If c is 0xFF, then ext is incremented
381    and no octets are output. Otherwise, if rem is not the special value
382    -1, then the octet (rem+(c>>8)) is output. Then ext octets are output
383    with the value 0 if the carry bit is set, or 0xFF if it is not, and
384    rem is set to the lower 8 bits of c. After this, ext is set to zero.
385 </t>
386 <t>
387    In the reference implementation, a special version of ec_encode()
388    called ec_encode_bin() (rangeenc.c) is defined to
389    take a two-tuple (fl,ftb), where <![CDATA[0 <= fl < 2^ftb and ftb < 16. It is
390    mathematically equivalent to calling ec_encode() with the three-tuple
391    (fl,fl+1,1<<ftb)]]>, but avoids using division.
392
393 </t>
394 </section>
395
396 <section anchor="encoding-ints" title="Encoding Uniformly Distributed Integers">
397 <t>
398    Functions ec_enc_uint() or ec_enc_bits() are based on ec_encode() and 
399    encode one of N equiprobable symbols, each with a frequency of 1,
400    where N may be as large as 2^32-1. Because ec_encode() is limited to
401    a total frequency of 2^16-1, this is done by encoding a series of
402    symbols in smaller contexts.
403 </t>
404 <t>
405    ec_enc_bits() (entenc.c) is defined, like
406    ec_encode_bin(), to take a two-tuple (fl,ftb), with <![CDATA[0 <= fl < 2^ftb
407    and ftb < 32. While ftb is greater than 8, it encodes bits (ftb-8) to
408    (ftb-1) of fl, e.g., (fl>>ftb-8&0xFF) using ec_encode_bin() and
409    subtracts 8 from ftb. Then, it encodes the remaining bits of fl, e.g.,
410    (fl&(1<<ftb)-1)]]>, again using ec_encode_bin().
411 </t>
412 <t>
413    ec_enc_uint() (entenc.c) takes a two-tuple (fl,ft),
414    where ft is not necessarily a power of two. Let ftb be the location
415    of the highest 1 bit in the two's-complement representation of
416    (ft-1), or -1 if no bits are set. If ftb>8, then the top 8 bits of fl
417    are encoded using ec_encode() with the three-tuple
418    (fl>>ftb-8,(fl>>ftb-8)+1,(ft-1>>ftb-8)+1), and the remaining bits
419    are encoded with ec_enc_bits using the two-tuple
420    <![CDATA[(fl&(1<<ftb-8)-1,ftb-8). Otherwise, fl is encoded with ec_encode()
421    directly using the three-tuple (fl,fl+1,ft)]]>.
422 </t>
423 </section>
424
425 <section anchor="encoder-finalizing" title="Finalizing the Stream">
426 <t>
427    After all symbols are encoded, the stream must be finalized by
428    outputting a value inside the current range. Let end be the integer
429    in the interval [low,low+rng) with the largest number of trailing
430    zero bits. Then while end is not zero, the top 9 bits of end, e.g.,
431    <![CDATA[(end>>23), are sent to the carry buffer, and end is replaced by
432    (end<<8&0x7FFFFFFF). Finally, if the value in carry buffer, rem, is]]>
433    neither zero nor the special value -1, or the carry count, ext, is
434    greater than zero, then 9 zero bits are sent to the carry buffer.
435    After the carry buffer is finished outputting octets, the rest of the
436    output buffer is padded with zero octets. Finally, rem is set to the
437    special value -1. This process is implemented by ec_enc_done()
438    (rangeenc.c).
439 </t>
440 </section>
441
442 <section anchor="encoder-tell" title="Current Bit Usage">
443 <t>
444    The bit allocation routines in Opus need to be able to determine a
445    conservative upper bound on the number of bits that have been used
446    to encode the current frame thus far. This drives allocation
447    decisions and ensures that the range code will not overflow the
448    output buffer. This is computed in the reference implementation to
449    fractional bit precision by the function ec_enc_tell() 
450    (rangeenc.c).
451    Like all operations in the range encoder, it must
452    be implemented in a bit-exact manner.
453 </t>
454 </section>
455
456 </section>
457
458         <section title='SILK Encoder'>
459           <t>
460             In the following, we focus on the core encoder and describe its components. For simplicity, we will refer to the core encoder simply as the encoder in the remainder of this document. An overview of the encoder is given in <xref target="encoder_figure" />.
461           </t>
462
463           <figure align="center" anchor="encoder_figure">
464             <artwork align="center">
465               <![CDATA[
466                                                               +---+
467                                +----------------------------->|   |
468         +---------+            |     +---------+              |   |
469         |Voice    |            |     |LTP      |              |   |
470  +----->|Activity |-----+      +---->|Scaling  |---------+--->|   |
471  |      |Detector |  3  |      |     |Control  |<+  12   |    |   |
472  |      +---------+     |      |     +---------+ |       |    |   |
473  |                      |      |     +---------+ |       |    |   |
474  |                      |      |     |Gains    | |  11   |    |   |
475  |                      |      |  +->|Processor|-|---+---|--->| R |
476  |                      |      |  |  |         | |   |   |    | a |
477  |                     \/      |  |  +---------+ |   |   |    | n |
478  |                 +---------+ |  |  +---------+ |   |   |    | g |
479  |                 |Pitch    | |  |  |LSF      | |   |   |    | e |
480  |              +->|Analysis |-+  |  |Quantizer|-|---|---|--->|   |
481  |              |  |         |4|  |  |         | | 8 |   |    | E |->
482  |              |  +---------+ |  |  +---------+ |   |   |    | n |14
483  |              |              |  |   9/\  10|   |   |   |    | c |
484  |              |              |  |    |    \/   |   |   |    | o |
485  |              |  +---------+ |  |  +----------+|   |   |    | d |
486  |              |  |Noise    | +--|->|Prediction|+---|---|--->| e |
487  |              +->|Shaping  |-|--+  |Analysis  || 7 |   |    | r |
488  |              |  |Analysis |5|  |  |          ||   |   |    |   |
489  |              |  +---------+ |  |  +----------+|   |   |    |   |
490  |              |              |  |       /\     |   |   |    |   |
491  |              |    +---------|--|-------+      |   |   |    |   |
492  |              |    |        \/  \/            \/  \/  \/    |   |
493  |  +---------+ |    |      +---------+       +------------+  |   |
494  |  |High-Pass| |    |      |         |       |Noise       |  |   |
495 -+->|Filter   |-+----+----->|Prefilter|------>|Shaping     |->|   |
496 1   |         |      2      |         |   6   |Quantization|13|   |
497     +---------+             +---------+       +------------+  +---+
498
499 1:  Input speech signal
500 2:  High passed input signal
501 3:  Voice activity estimate
502 4:  Pitch lags (per 5 ms) and voicing decision (per 20 ms)
503 5:  Noise shaping quantization coefficients
504   - Short term synthesis and analysis 
505     noise shaping coefficients (per 5 ms)
506   - Long term synthesis and analysis noise 
507     shaping coefficients (per 5 ms and for voiced speech only)
508   - Noise shaping tilt (per 5 ms)
509   - Quantizer gain/step size (per 5 ms)
510 6:  Input signal filtered with analysis noise shaping filters
511 7:  Short and long term prediction coefficients
512     LTP (per 5 ms) and LPC (per 20 ms)
513 8:  LSF quantization indices
514 9:  LSF coefficients
515 10: Quantized LSF coefficients 
516 11: Processed gains, and synthesis noise shape coefficients
517 12: LTP state scaling coefficient. Controlling error propagation
518    / prediction gain trade-off
519 13: Quantized signal
520 14: Range encoded bitstream
521
522 ]]>
523             </artwork>
524             <postamble>Encoder block diagram.</postamble>
525           </figure>
526
527           <section title='Voice Activity Detection'>
528             <t>
529               The input signal is processed by a VAD (Voice Activity Detector) to produce a measure of voice activity, and also spectral tilt and signal-to-noise estimates, for each frame. The VAD uses a sequence of half-band filterbanks to split the signal in four subbands: 0 - Fs/16, Fs/16 - Fs/8, Fs/8 - Fs/4, and Fs/4 - Fs/2, where Fs is the sampling frequency, that is, 8, 12, 16 or 24 kHz. The lowest subband, from 0 - Fs/16 is high-pass filtered with a first-order MA (Moving Average) filter (with transfer function H(z) = 1-z^(-1)) to reduce the energy at the lowest frequencies. For each frame, the signal energy per subband is computed. In each subband, a noise level estimator tracks the background noise level and an SNR (Signal-to-Noise Ratio) value is computed as the logarithm of the ratio of energy to noise level. Using these intermediate variables, the following parameters are calculated for use in other SILK modules:
530               <list style="symbols">
531                 <t>
532                   Average SNR. The average of the subband SNR values.
533                 </t>
534
535                 <t>
536                   Smoothed subband SNRs. Temporally smoothed subband SNR values.
537                 </t>
538
539                 <t>
540                   Speech activity level. Based on the average SNR and a weighted average of the subband energies.
541                 </t>
542
543                 <t>
544                   Spectral tilt. A weighted average of the subband SNRs, with positive weights for the low subbands and negative weights for the high subbands.
545                 </t>
546               </list>
547             </t>
548           </section>
549
550           <section title='High-Pass Filter'>
551             <t>
552               The input signal is filtered by a high-pass filter to remove the lowest part of the spectrum that contains little speech energy and may contain background noise. This is a second order ARMA (Auto Regressive Moving Average) filter with a cut-off frequency around 70 Hz.
553             </t>
554             <t>
555               In the future, a music detector may also be used to lower the cut-off frequency when the input signal is detected to be music rather than speech.
556             </t>
557           </section>
558
559           <section title='Pitch Analysis' anchor='pitch_estimator_overview_section'>
560             <t>
561               The high-passed input signal is processed by the open loop pitch estimator shown in <xref target='pitch_estimator_figure' />.
562               <figure align="center" anchor="pitch_estimator_figure">
563                 <artwork align="center">
564                   <![CDATA[
565                                  +--------+  +----------+     
566                                  |2 x Down|  |Time-     |      
567                               +->|sampling|->|Correlator|     |
568                               |  |        |  |          |     |4
569                               |  +--------+  +----------+    \/
570                               |                    | 2    +-------+
571                               |                    |  +-->|Speech |5
572     +---------+    +--------+ |                   \/  |   |Type   |->
573     |LPC      |    |Down    | |              +----------+ |       |
574  +->|Analysis | +->|sample  |-+------------->|Time-     | +-------+
575  |  |         | |  |to 8 kHz|                |Correlator|----------->
576  |  +---------+ |  +--------+                |__________|          6
577  |       |      |                                  |3
578  |      \/      |                                 \/ 
579  |  +---------+ |                            +----------+
580  |  |Whitening| |                            |Time-     |    
581 -+->|Filter   |-+--------------------------->|Correlator|----------->
582 1   |         |                              |          |          7
583     +---------+                              +----------+ 
584                                             
585 1: Input signal
586 2: Lag candidates from stage 1
587 3: Lag candidates from stage 2
588 4: Correlation threshold
589 5: Voiced/unvoiced flag
590 6: Pitch correlation
591 7: Pitch lags 
592 ]]>
593                 </artwork>
594                 <postamble>Block diagram of the pitch estimator.</postamble>
595               </figure>
596               The pitch analysis finds a binary voiced/unvoiced classification, and, for frames classified as voiced, four pitch lags per frame - one for each 5 ms subframe - and a pitch correlation indicating the periodicity of the signal. The input is first whitened using a Linear Prediction (LP) whitening filter, where the coefficients are computed through standard Linear Prediction Coding (LPC) analysis. The order of the whitening filter is 16 for best results, but is reduced to 12 for medium complexity and 8 for low complexity modes. The whitened signal is analyzed to find pitch lags for which the time correlation is high. The analysis consists of three stages for reducing the complexity:
597               <list style="symbols">
598                 <t>In the first stage, the whitened signal is downsampled to 4 kHz (from 8 kHz) and the current frame is correlated to a signal delayed by a range of lags, starting from a shortest lag corresponding to 500 Hz, to a longest lag corresponding to 56 Hz.</t>
599
600                 <t>
601                   The second stage operates on a 8 kHz signal ( downsampled from 12, 16 or 24 kHz ) and measures time correlations only near the lags corresponding to those that had sufficiently high correlations in the first stage. The resulting correlations are adjusted for a small bias towards short lags to avoid ending up with a multiple of the true pitch lag. The highest adjusted correlation is compared to a threshold depending on:
602                   <list style="symbols">
603                     <t>
604                       Whether the previous frame was classified as voiced
605                     </t>
606                     <t>
607                       The speech activity level
608                     </t>
609                     <t>
610                       The spectral tilt.
611                     </t>
612                   </list>
613                   If the threshold is exceeded, the current frame is classified as voiced and the lag with the highest adjusted correlation is stored for a final pitch analysis of the highest precision in the third stage.
614                 </t>
615                 <t>
616                   The last stage operates directly on the whitened input signal to compute time correlations for each of the four subframes independently in a narrow range around the lag with highest correlation from the second stage.
617                 </t>
618               </list>
619             </t>
620           </section>
621
622           <section title='Noise Shaping Analysis' anchor='noise_shaping_analysis_overview_section'>
623             <t>
624               The noise shaping analysis finds gains and filter coefficients used in the prefilter and noise shaping quantizer. These parameters are chosen such that they will fulfil several requirements:
625               <list style="symbols">
626                 <t>Balancing quantization noise and bitrate. The quantization gains determine the step size between reconstruction levels of the excitation signal. Therefore, increasing the quantization gain amplifies quantization noise, but also reduces the bitrate by lowering the entropy of the quantization indices.</t>
627                 <t>Spectral shaping of the quantization noise; the noise shaping quantizer is capable of reducing quantization noise in some parts of the spectrum at the cost of increased noise in other parts without substantially changing the bitrate. By shaping the noise such that it follows the signal spectrum, it becomes less audible. In practice, best results are obtained by making the shape of the noise spectrum slightly flatter than the signal spectrum.</t>
628                 <t>Deemphasizing spectral valleys; by using different coefficients in the analysis and synthesis part of the prefilter and noise shaping quantizer, the levels of the spectral valleys can be decreased relative to the levels of the spectral peaks such as speech formants and harmonics. This reduces the entropy of the signal, which is the difference between the coded signal and the quantization noise, thus lowering the bitrate.</t>
629                 <t>Matching the levels of the decoded speech formants to the levels of the original speech formants; an adjustment gain and a first order tilt coefficient are computed to compensate for the effect of the noise shaping quantization on the level and spectral tilt.</t>
630               </list>
631             </t>
632             <t>
633               <figure align="center" anchor="noise_shape_analysis_spectra_figure">
634                 <artwork align="center">
635                   <![CDATA[
636   / \   ___
637    |   // \\
638    |  //   \\     ____
639    |_//     \\___//  \\         ____
640    | /  ___  \   /    \\       //  \\
641  P |/  /   \  \_/      \\_____//    \\
642  o |  /     \     ____  \     /      \\
643  w | /       \___/    \  \___/  ____  \\___ 1
644  e |/                  \       /    \  \    
645  r |                    \_____/      \  \__ 2
646    |                                  \     
647    |                                   \___ 3
648    |
649    +---------------------------------------->
650                     Frequency
651
652 1: Input signal spectrum
653 2: Deemphasized and level matched spectrum
654 3: Quantization noise spectrum
655 ]]>
656                 </artwork>
657                 <postamble>Noise shaping and spectral de-emphasis illustration.</postamble>
658               </figure>
659               <xref target='noise_shape_analysis_spectra_figure' /> shows an example of an input signal spectrum (1). After de-emphasis and level matching, the spectrum has deeper valleys (2). The quantization noise spectrum (3) more or less follows the input signal spectrum, while having slightly less pronounced peaks. The entropy, which provides a lower bound on the bitrate for encoding the excitation signal, is proportional to the area between the deemphasized spectrum (2) and the quantization noise spectrum (3). Without de-emphasis, the entropy is proportional to the area between input spectrum (1) and quantization noise (3) - clearly higher.
660             </t>
661
662             <t>
663               The transformation from input signal to deemphasized signal can be described as a filtering operation with a filter
664               <figure align="center">
665                 <artwork align="center">
666                   <![CDATA[
667                                      Wana(z)
668 H(z) = G * ( 1 - c_tilt * z^(-1) ) * -------
669                                      Wsyn(z),
670             ]]>
671                 </artwork>
672               </figure>
673               having an adjustment gain G, a first order tilt adjustment filter with
674               tilt coefficient c_tilt, and where
675               <figure align="center">
676                 <artwork align="center">
677                   <![CDATA[
678                16                                 d
679                __                                __
680 Wana(z) = (1 - \ (a_ana(k) * z^(-k))*(1 - z^(-L) \ b_ana(k)*z^(-k)),
681                /_                                /_  
682                k=1                               k=-d
683             ]]>
684                 </artwork>
685               </figure>
686               is the analysis part of the de-emphasis filter, consisting of the short-term shaping filter with coefficients a_ana(k), and the long-term shaping filter with coefficients b_ana(k) and pitch lag L. The parameter d determines the number of long-term shaping filter taps.
687             </t>
688
689             <t>
690               Similarly, but without the tilt adjustment, the synthesis part can be written as
691               <figure align="center">
692                 <artwork align="center">
693                   <![CDATA[
694                16                                 d
695                __                                __
696 Wsyn(z) = (1 - \ (a_syn(k) * z^(-k))*(1 - z^(-L) \ b_syn(k)*z^(-k)).
697                /_                                /_  
698                k=1                               k=-d
699             ]]>
700                 </artwork>
701               </figure>
702             </t>
703             <t>
704               All noise shaping parameters are computed and applied per subframe of 5 milliseconds. First, an LPC analysis is performed on a windowed signal block of 15 milliseconds. The signal block has a look-ahead of 5 milliseconds relative to the current subframe, and the window is an asymmetric sine window. The LPC analysis is done with the autocorrelation method, with an order of 16 for best quality or 12 in low complexity operation. The quantization gain is found as the square-root of the residual energy from the LPC analysis, multiplied by a value inversely proportional to the coding quality control parameter and the pitch correlation.
705             </t>
706             <t>
707               Next we find the two sets of short-term noise shaping coefficients a_ana(k) and a_syn(k), by applying different amounts of bandwidth expansion to the coefficients found in the LPC analysis. This bandwidth expansion moves the roots of the LPC polynomial towards the origo, using the formulas
708               <figure align="center">
709                 <artwork align="center">
710                   <![CDATA[
711  a_ana(k) = a(k)*g_ana^k, and
712  a_syn(k) = a(k)*g_syn^k,
713             ]]>
714                 </artwork>
715               </figure>
716               where a(k) is the k'th LPC coefficient and the bandwidth expansion factors g_ana and g_syn are calculated as
717               <figure align="center">
718                 <artwork align="center">
719                   <![CDATA[
720 g_ana = 0.94 - 0.02*C, and
721 g_syn = 0.94 + 0.02*C,
722             ]]>
723                 </artwork>
724               </figure>
725               where C is the coding quality control parameter between 0 and 1. Applying more bandwidth expansion to the analysis part than to the synthesis part gives the desired de-emphasis of spectral valleys in between formants.
726             </t>
727
728             <t>
729               The long-term shaping is applied only during voiced frames. It uses three filter taps, described by
730               <figure align="center">
731                 <artwork align="center">
732                   <![CDATA[
733 b_ana = F_ana * [0.25, 0.5, 0.25], and
734 b_syn = F_syn * [0.25, 0.5, 0.25].
735             ]]>
736                 </artwork>
737               </figure>
738               For unvoiced frames these coefficients are set to 0. The multiplication factors F_ana and F_syn are chosen between 0 and 1, depending on the coding quality control parameter, as well as the calculated pitch correlation and smoothed subband SNR of the lowest subband. By having F_ana less than F_syn, the pitch harmonics are emphasized relative to the valleys in between the harmonics.
739             </t>
740
741             <t>
742               The tilt coefficient c_tilt is for unvoiced frames chosen as
743               <figure align="center">
744                 <artwork align="center">
745                   <![CDATA[
746 c_tilt = 0.4, and as
747 c_tilt = 0.04 + 0.06 * C
748             ]]>
749                 </artwork>
750               </figure>
751               for voiced frames, where C again is the coding quality control parameter and is between 0 and 1.
752             </t>
753             <t>
754               The adjustment gain G serves to correct any level mismatch between original and decoded signal that might arise from the noise shaping and de-emphasis. This gain is computed as the ratio of the prediction gain of the short-term analysis and synthesis filter coefficients. The prediction gain of an LPC synthesis filter is the square-root of the output energy when the filter is excited by a unit-energy impulse on the input. An efficient way to compute the prediction gain is by first computing the reflection coefficients from the LPC coefficients through the step-down algorithm, and extracting the prediction gain from the reflection coefficients as
755               <figure align="center">
756                 <artwork align="center">
757                   <![CDATA[
758                K
759               ___
760  predGain = ( | | 1 - (r_k)^2 )^(-0.5),
761               k=1
762             ]]>
763                 </artwork>
764               </figure>
765               where r_k is the k'th reflection coefficient.
766             </t>
767
768             <t>
769               Initial values for the quantization gains are computed as the square-root of the residual energy of the LPC analysis, adjusted by the coding quality control parameter. These quantization gains are later adjusted based on the results of the prediction analysis.
770             </t>
771           </section>
772
773           <section title='Prefilter'>
774             <t>
775               In the prefilter the input signal is filtered using the spectral valley de-emphasis filter coefficients from the noise shaping analysis, see <xref target='noise_shaping_analysis_overview_section' />. By applying only the noise shaping analysis filter to the input signal, it provides the input to the noise shaping quantizer.
776             </t>
777           </section>
778           <section title='Prediction Analysis' anchor='pred_ana_overview_section'>
779             <t>
780               The prediction analysis is performed in one of two ways depending on how the pitch estimator classified the frame. The processing for voiced and unvoiced speech are described in <xref target='pred_ana_voiced_overview_section' /> and <xref target='pred_ana_unvoiced_overview_section' />, respectively. Inputs to this function include the pre-whitened signal from the pitch estimator, see <xref target='pitch_estimator_overview_section' />.
781             </t>
782
783             <section title='Voiced Speech' anchor='pred_ana_voiced_overview_section'>
784               <t>
785                 For a frame of voiced speech the pitch pulses will remain dominant in the pre-whitened input signal. Further whitening is desirable as it leads to higher quality at the same available bit-rate. To achieve this, a Long-Term Prediction (LTP) analysis is carried out to estimate the coefficients of a fifth order LTP filter for each of four sub-frames. The LTP coefficients are used to find an LTP residual signal with the simulated output signal as input to obtain better modelling of the output signal. This LTP residual signal is the input to an LPC analysis where the LPCs are estimated using Burgs method, such that the residual energy is minimized. The estimated LPCs are converted to a Line Spectral Frequency (LSF) vector, and quantized as described in <xref target='lsf_quantizer_overview_section' />. After quantization, the quantized LSF vector is converted to LPC coefficients and hence by using these quantized coefficients the encoder remains fully synchronized with the decoder. The LTP coefficients are quantized using a method described in <xref target='ltp_quantizer_overview_section' />. The quantized LPC and LTP coefficients are now used to filter the high-pass filtered input signal and measure a residual energy for each of the four subframes.
786               </t>
787             </section>
788             <section title='Unvoiced Speech' anchor='pred_ana_unvoiced_overview_section'>
789               <t>
790                 For a speech signal that has been classified as unvoiced there is no need for LTP filtering as it has already been determined that the pre-whitened input signal is not periodic enough within the allowed pitch period range for an LTP analysis to be worth-while the cost in terms of complexity and rate. Therefore, the pre-whitened input signal is discarded and instead the high-pass filtered input signal is used for LPC analysis using Burgs method. The resulting LPC coefficients are converted to an LSF vector, quantized as described in the following section and transformed back to obtain quantized LPC coefficients. The quantized LPC coefficients are used to filter the high-pass filtered input signal and measure a residual energy for each of the four subframes.
791               </t>
792             </section>
793           </section>
794
795           <section title='LSF Quantization' anchor='lsf_quantizer_overview_section'>
796             <t>The purpose of quantization in general is to significantly lower the bit rate at the cost of some introduced distortion. A higher rate should always result in lower distortion, and lowering the rate will generally lead to higher distortion. A commonly used but generally sub-optimal approach is to use a quantization method with a constant rate where only the error is minimized when quantizing.</t>
797             <section title='Rate-Distortion Optimization'>
798               <t>Instead, we minimize an objective function that consists of a weighted sum of rate and distortion, and use a codebook with an associated non-uniform rate table. Thus, we take into account that the probability mass function for selecting the codebook entries are by no means guaranteed to be uniform in our scenario. The advantage of this approach is that it ensures that rarely used codebook vector centroids, which are modelling statistical outliers in the training set can be quantized with a low error but with a relatively high cost in terms of a high rate. At the same time this approach also provides the advantage that frequently used centroids are modelled with low error and a relatively low rate. This approach will lead to equal or lower distortion than the fixed rate codebook at any given average rate, provided that the data is similar to the data used for training the codebook.</t>
799             </section>
800
801             <section title='Error Mapping' anchor='lsf_error_mapping_overview_section'>
802               <t>
803                 Instead of minimizing the error in the LSF domain, we map the errors to better approximate spectral distortion by applying an individual weight to each element in the error vector. The weight vectors are calculated for each input vector using the Inverse Harmonic Mean Weighting (IHMW) function proposed by Laroia et al., see <xref target="laroia-icassp" />.
804                 Consequently, we solve the following minimization problem, i.e.,
805                 <figure align="center">
806                   <artwork align="center">
807                     <![CDATA[
808 LSF_q = argmin { (LSF - c)' * W * (LSF - c) + mu * rate },
809         c in C
810             ]]>
811                   </artwork>
812                 </figure>
813                 where LSF_q is the quantized vector, LSF is the input vector to be quantized, and c is the quantized LSF vector candidate taken from the set C of all possible outcomes of the codebook.
814               </t>
815             </section>
816             <section title='Multi-Stage Vector Codebook'>
817               <t>
818                 We arrange the codebook in a multiple stage structure to achieve a quantizer that is both memory efficient and highly scalable in terms of computational complexity, see e.g. <xref target="sinervo-norsig" />. In the first stage the input is the LSF vector to be quantized, and in any other stage s > 1, the input is the quantization error from the previous stage, see <xref target='lsf_quantizer_structure_overview_figure' />.
819                 <figure align="center" anchor="lsf_quantizer_structure_overview_figure">
820                   <artwork align="center">
821                     <![CDATA[
822       Stage 1:           Stage 2:                Stage S:
823     +----------+       +----------+            +----------+
824     |  c_{1,1} |       |  c_{2,1} |            |  c_{S,1} | 
825 LSF +----------+ res_1 +----------+  res_{S-1} +----------+
826 --->|  c_{1,2} |------>|  c_{2,2} |--> ... --->|  c_{S,2} |--->
827     +----------+       +----------+            +----------+ res_S =
828         ...                ...                     ...      LSF-LSF_q
829     +----------+       +----------+            +----------+ 
830     |c_{1,M1-1}|       |c_{2,M2-1}|            |c_{S,MS-1}|
831     +----------+       +----------+            +----------+     
832     | c_{1,M1} |       | c_{2,M2} |            | c_{S,MS} |
833     +----------+       +----------+            +----------+
834 ]]>
835                   </artwork>
836                   <postamble>Multi-Stage LSF Vector Codebook Structure.</postamble>
837                 </figure>
838               </t>
839
840               <t>
841                 By storing total of M codebook vectors, i.e.,
842                 <figure align="center">
843                   <artwork align="center">
844                     <![CDATA[
845      S
846     __
847 M = \  Ms,
848     /_
849     s=1
850 ]]>
851                   </artwork>
852                 </figure>
853                 where M_s is the number of vectors in stage s, we obtain a total of
854                 <figure align="center">
855                   <artwork align="center">
856                     <![CDATA[
857      S
858     ___
859 T = | | Ms
860     s=1
861 ]]>
862                   </artwork>
863                 </figure>
864                 possible combinations for generating the quantized vector. It is for example possible to represent 2^36 uniquely combined vectors using only 216 vectors in memory, as done in SILK for voiced speech at all sample frequencies above 8 kHz.
865               </t>
866             </section>
867             <section title='Survivor Based Codebook Search'>
868               <t>
869                 This number of possible combinations is far too high for a full search to be carried out for each frame so for all stages but the last, i.e., s smaller than S, only the best min( L, Ms ) centroids are carried over to stage s+1. In each stage the objective function, i.e., the weighted sum of accumulated bit-rate and distortion, is evaluated for each codebook vector entry and the results are sorted. Only the best paths and the corresponding quantization errors are considered in the next stage. In the last stage S the single best path through the multistage codebook is determined. By varying the maximum number of survivors from each stage to the next L, the complexity can be adjusted in real-time at the cost of a potential increase when evaluating the objective function for the resulting quantized vector. This approach scales all the way between the two extremes, L=1 being a greedy search, and the desirable but infeasible full search, L=T/MS. In fact, a performance almost as good as what can be achieved with the infeasible full search can be obtained at a substantially lower complexity by using this approach, see e.g. <xref target='leblanc-tsap' />.
870               </t>
871             </section>
872             <section title='LSF Stabilization' anchor='lsf_stabilizer_overview_section'>
873               <t>If the input is stable, finding the best candidate will usually result in the quantized vector also being stable, but due to the multi-stage approach it could in theory happen that the best quantization candidate is unstable and because of this there is a need to explicitly ensure that the quantized vectors are stable. Therefore we apply a LSF stabilization method which ensures that the LSF parameters are within valid range, increasingly sorted, and have minimum distances between each other and the border values that have been pre-determined as the 0.01 percentile distance values from a large training set.</t>
874             </section>
875             <section title='Off-Line Codebook Training'>
876               <t>
877                 The vectors and rate tables for the multi-stage codebook have been trained by minimizing the average of the objective function for LSF vectors from a large training set.
878               </t>
879             </section>
880           </section>
881
882           <section title='LTP Quantization' anchor='ltp_quantizer_overview_section'>
883             <t>
884               For voiced frames, the prediction analysis described in <xref target='pred_ana_voiced_overview_section' /> resulted in four sets (one set per subframe) of five LTP coefficients, plus four weighting matrices. Also, the LTP coefficients for each subframe are quantized using entropy constrained vector quantization. A total of three vector codebooks are available for quantization, with different rate-distortion trade-offs. The three codebooks have 10, 20 and 40 vectors and average rates of about 3, 4, and 5 bits per vector, respectively. Consequently, the first codebook has larger average quantization distortion at a lower rate, whereas the last codebook has smaller average quantization distortion at a higher rate. Given the weighting matrix W_ltp and LTP vector b, the weighted rate-distortion measure for a codebook vector cb_i with rate r_i is give by
885               <figure align="center">
886                 <artwork align="center">
887                   <![CDATA[
888  RD = u * (b - cb_i)' * W_ltp * (b - cb_i) + r_i,
889 ]]>
890                 </artwork>
891               </figure>
892               where u is a fixed, heuristically-determined parameter balancing the distortion and rate. Which codebook gives the best performance for a given LTP vector depends on the weighting matrix for that LTP vector. For example, for a low valued W_ltp, it is advantageous to use the codebook with 10 vectors as it has a lower average rate. For a large W_ltp, on the other hand, it is often better to use the codebook with 40 vectors, as it is more likely to contain the best codebook vector.
893               The weighting matrix W_ltp depends mostly on two aspects of the input signal. The first is the periodicity of the signal; the more periodic the larger W_ltp. The second is the change in signal energy in the current subframe, relative to the signal one pitch lag earlier. A decaying energy leads to a larger W_ltp than an increasing energy. Both aspects do not fluctuate very fast which causes the W_ltp matrices for different subframes of one frame often to be similar. As a result, one of the three codebooks typically gives good performance for all subframes. Therefore the codebook search for the subframe LTP vectors is constrained to only allow codebook vectors to be chosen from the same codebook, resulting in a rate reduction.
894             </t>
895
896             <t>
897               To find the best codebook, each of the three vector codebooks is used to quantize all subframe LTP vectors and produce a combined weighted rate-distortion measure for each vector codebook and the vector codebook with the lowest combined rate-distortion over all subframes is chosen. The quantized LTP vectors are used in the noise shaping quantizer, and the index of the codebook plus the four indices for the four subframe codebook vectors are passed on to the range encoder.
898             </t>
899           </section>
900
901
902           <section title='Noise Shaping Quantizer'>
903             <t>
904               The noise shaping quantizer independently shapes the signal and coding noise spectra to obtain a perceptually higher quality at the same bitrate.
905             </t>
906             <t>
907               The prefilter output signal is multiplied with a compensation gain G computed in the noise shaping analysis. Then the output of a synthesis shaping filter is added, and the output of a prediction filter is subtracted to create a residual signal. The residual signal is multiplied by the inverse quantized quantization gain from the noise shaping analysis, and input to a scalar quantizer. The quantization indices of the scalar quantizer represent a signal of pulses that is input to the pyramid range encoder. The scalar quantizer also outputs a quantization signal, which is multiplied by the quantized quantization gain from the noise shaping analysis to create an excitation signal. The output of the prediction filter is added to the excitation signal to form the quantized output signal y(n). The quantized output signal y(n) is input to the synthesis shaping and prediction filters.
908             </t>
909
910           </section>
911
912           <section title='Range Encoder'>
913             <t>
914               Range encoding is a well known method for entropy coding in which a bitstream sequence is continually updated with every new symbol, based on the probability for that symbol. It is similar to arithmetic coding but rather than being restricted to generating binary output symbols, it can generate symbols in any chosen number base. In SILK all side information is range encoded. Each quantized parameter has its own cumulative density function based on histograms for the quantization indices obtained by running a training database.
915             </t>
916
917             <section title='Bitstream Encoding Details'>
918               <t>
919                 TBD.
920               </t>
921             </section>
922           </section>
923         </section>
924
925
926 <section title="CELT Encoder">
927 <t>
928 Copy from CELT draft.
929 </t>
930
931 <section anchor="forward-mdct" title="Forward MDCT">
932
933 <t>The MDCT implementation has no special characteristics. The
934 input is a windowed signal (after pre-emphasis) of 2*N samples and the output is N
935 frequency-domain samples. A <spanx style="emph">low-overlap</spanx> window is used to reduce the algorithmic delay. 
936 It is derived from a basic (full overlap) window that is the same as the one used in the Vorbis codec: W(n)=[sin(pi/2*sin(pi/2*(n+.5)/L))]^2. The low-overlap window is created by zero-padding the basic window and inserting ones in the middle, such that the resulting window still satisfies power complementarity. The MDCT is computed in mdct_forward() (mdct.c), which includes the windowing operation and a scaling of 2/N.
937 </t>
938 </section>
939
940 <section anchor="normalization" title="Bands and Normalization">
941 <t>
942 The MDCT output is divided into bands that are designed to match the ear's critical bands,
943 with the exception that each band has to be at least 3 bins wide. For each band, the encoder
944 computes the energy that will later be encoded. Each band is then normalized by the 
945 square root of the <spanx style="strong">non-quantized</spanx> energy, such that each band now forms a unit vector X.
946 The energy and the normalization are computed by compute_band_energies()
947 and normalise_bands() (bands.c), respectively.
948 </t>
949 </section>
950
951 <section anchor="energy-quantization" title="Energy Envelope Quantization">
952
953 <t>
954 It is important to quantize the energy with sufficient resolution because
955 any energy quantization error cannot be compensated for at a later
956 stage. Regardless of the resolution used for encoding the shape of a band,
957 it is perceptually important to preserve the energy in each band. CELT uses a
958 coarse-fine strategy for encoding the energy in the base-2 log domain, 
959 as implemented in quant_bands.c</t>
960
961 <section anchor="coarse-energy" title="Coarse energy quantization">
962 <t>
963 The coarse quantization of the energy uses a fixed resolution of
964 6 dB and is the only place where entropy coding is used.
965 To minimize the bitrate, prediction is applied both in time (using the previous frame)
966 and in frequency (using the previous bands). The 2-D z-transform of
967 the prediction filter is: A(z_l, z_b)=(1-a*z_l^-1)*(1-z_b^-1)/(1-b*z_b^-1)
968 where b is the band index and l is the frame index. The prediction coefficients are
969 a=0.8 and b=0.7 when not using intra energy and a=b=0 when using intra energy. 
970 The time-domain prediction is based on the final fine quantization of the previous
971 frame, while the frequency domain (within the current frame) prediction is based
972 on coarse quantization only (because the fine quantization has not been computed
973 yet). We approximate the ideal 
974 probability distribution of the prediction error using a Laplace distribution. The
975 coarse energy quantization is performed by quant_coarse_energy() and 
976 quant_coarse_energy() (quant_bands.c).
977 </t>
978
979 <t>
980 The Laplace distribution for each band is defined by a 16-bit (Q15) decay parameter.
981 Thus, the value 0 has a frequency count of p[0]=2*(16384*(16384-decay)/(16384+decay)). The 
982 values +/- i each have a frequency count p[i] = (p[i-1]*decay)>>14. The value of p[i] is always
983 rounded down (to avoid exceeding 32768 as the sum of all frequency counts), so it is possible
984 for the sum to be less than 32768. In that case additional values with a frequency count of 1 are encoded. The signed values corresponding to symbols 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, ... 
985 are [0, +1, -1, +2, -2, ...]. The encoding of the Laplace-distributed values is 
986 implemented in ec_laplace_encode() (laplace.c).
987 </t>
988 <!-- FIXME: bit budget consideration -->
989 </section> <!-- coarse energy -->
990
991 <section anchor="fine-energy" title="Fine energy quantization">
992 <t>
993 After the coarse energy quantization and encoding, the bit allocation is computed 
994 (<xref target="allocation"></xref>) and the number of bits to use for refining the
995 energy quantization is determined for each band. Let B_i be the number of fine energy bits 
996 for band i; the refinement is an integer f in the range [0,2^B_i-1]. The mapping between f
997 and the correction applied to the coarse energy is equal to (f+1/2)/2^B_i - 1/2. Fine
998 energy quantization is implemented in quant_fine_energy() 
999 (quant_bands.c).
1000 </t>
1001
1002 <t>
1003 If any bits are unused at the end of the encoding process, these bits are used to
1004 increase the resolution of the fine energy encoding in some bands. Priority is given
1005 to the bands for which the allocation (<xref target="allocation"></xref>) was rounded
1006 down. At the same level of priority, lower bands are encoded first. Refinement bits
1007 are added until there are no unused bits. This is implemented in quant_energy_finalise() 
1008 (quant_bands.c).
1009 </t>
1010
1011 </section> <!-- fine energy -->
1012
1013
1014 </section> <!-- Energy quant -->
1015
1016 <section anchor="allocation" title="Bit Allocation">
1017 <t>Bit allocation is performed based only on information available to both
1018 the encoder and decoder. The same calculations are performed in a bit-exact
1019 manner in both the encoder and decoder to ensure that the result is always
1020 exactly the same. Any mismatch would cause an error in the decoded output.
1021 The allocation is computed by compute_allocation() (rate.c),
1022 which is used in both the encoder and the decoder.</t>
1023
1024 <t>For a given band, the bit allocation is nearly constant across
1025 frames that use the same number of bits for Q1, yielding a 
1026 pre-defined signal-to-mask ratio (SMR) for each band. Because the
1027 bands each have a width of one Bark, this is equivalent to modeling the
1028 masking occurring within each critical band, while ignoring inter-band
1029 masking and tone-vs-noise characteristics. While this is not an
1030 optimal bit allocation, it provides good results without requiring the
1031 transmission of any allocation information.
1032 </t>
1033
1034
1035 <t>
1036 For every encoded or decoded frame, a target allocation must be computed
1037 using the projected allocation. In the reference implementation this is
1038 performed by compute_allocation() (rate.c).
1039 The target computation begins by calculating the available space as the
1040 number of whole bits which can be fit in the frame after Q1 is stored according
1041 to the range coder (ec_[enc/dec]_tell()) and then multiplying by 8.
1042 Then the two projected prototype allocations whose sums multiplied by 8 are nearest
1043 to that value are determined. These two projected prototype allocations are then interpolated
1044 by finding the highest integer interpolation coefficient in the range 0-8
1045 such that the sum of the higher prototype times the coefficient, plus the
1046 sum of the lower prototype multiplied by
1047 the difference of 16 and the coefficient, is less than or equal to the
1048 available sixteenth-bits. 
1049 The reference implementation performs this step using a binary search in
1050 interp_bits2pulses() (rate.c). The target  
1051 allocation is the interpolation coefficient times the higher prototype, plus
1052 the lower prototype multiplied by the difference of 16 and the coefficient,
1053 for each of the CELT bands.   
1054 </t>
1055
1056 <t>
1057 Because the computed target will sometimes be somewhat smaller than the
1058 available space, the excess space is divided by the number of bands, and this amount
1059 is added equally to each band. Any remaining space is added to the target one
1060 sixteenth-bit at a time, starting from the first band. The new target now
1061 matches the available space, in sixteenth-bits, exactly. 
1062 </t>
1063
1064 <t>
1065 The allocation target is separated into a portion used for fine energy
1066 and a portion used for the Spherical Vector Quantizer (PVQ). The fine energy
1067 quantizer operates in whole-bit steps. For each band the number of bits per 
1068 channel used for fine energy is calculated by 50 minus the log2_frac(), with
1069 1/16 bit precision, of the number of MDCT bins in the band. That result is multiplied
1070 by the number of bins in the band and again by twice the number of                 
1071 channels, and then the value is set to zero if it is less than zero. Added
1072 to that result is 16 times the number of MDCT bins times the number of
1073 channels,  and it is finally divided by 32 times the number of MDCT bins times the
1074 number of channels. If the result times the number of channels is greater than than the
1075 target divided by 16, the result is set to the target divided by the number of
1076 channels divided by 16. Then if the value is greater than 7 it is reset to 7 because a
1077 larger amount of fine energy resolution was determined not to be make an improvement in
1078 perceived quality.  The resulting number of fine energy bits per channel is
1079 then multiplied by the number of channels and then by 16, and subtracted
1080 from the target allocation. This final target allocation is what is used for the
1081 PVQ.
1082 </t>
1083
1084 </section>
1085
1086 <section anchor="pitch-prediction" title="Pitch Prediction">
1087 <t>
1088 This section needs to be updated.
1089 </t>
1090
1091 </section>
1092
1093 <section anchor="pvq" title="Spherical Vector Quantization">
1094 <t>CELT uses a Pyramid Vector Quantization (PVQ) <xref target="PVQ"></xref>
1095 codebook for quantizing the details of the spectrum in each band that have not
1096 been predicted by the pitch predictor. The PVQ codebook consists of all sums
1097 of K signed pulses in a vector of N samples, where two pulses at the same position
1098 are required to have the same sign. Thus the codebook includes 
1099 all integer codevectors y of N dimensions that satisfy sum(abs(y(j))) = K.
1100 </t>
1101
1102 <t>
1103 In bands where neither pitch nor folding is used, the PVQ is used to encode
1104 the unit vector that results from the normalization in 
1105 <xref target="normalization"></xref> directly. Given a PVQ codevector y, 
1106 the unit vector X is obtained as X = y/||y||, where ||.|| denotes the 
1107 L2 norm.
1108 </t>
1109
1110 <section anchor="bits-pulses" title="Bits to Pulses">
1111 <t>
1112 Although the allocation is performed in 1/16 bit units, the quantization requires
1113 an integer number of pulses K. To do this, the encoder searches for the value
1114 of K that produces the number of bits that is the nearest to the allocated value
1115 (rounding down if exactly half-way between two values), subject to not exceeding
1116 the total number of bits available. The computation is performed in 1/16 of
1117 bits using log2_frac() and ec_enc_tell(). The number of codebooks entries can
1118 be computed as explained in <xref target="cwrs-encoding"></xref>. The difference
1119 between the number of bits allocated and the number of bits used is accumulated to a
1120 <spanx style="emph">balance</spanx> (initialised to zero) that helps adjusting the
1121 allocation for the next bands. One third of the balance is subtracted from the
1122 bit allocation of the next band to help achieving the target allocation. The only
1123 exceptions are the band before the last and the last band, for which half the balance
1124 and the whole balance are subtracted, respectively.
1125 </t>
1126 </section>
1127
1128 <section anchor="pvq-search" title="PVQ Search">
1129
1130 <t>
1131 The search for the best codevector y is performed by alg_quant()
1132 (vq.c). There are several possible approaches to the 
1133 search with a tradeoff between quality and complexity. The method used in the reference
1134 implementation computes an initial codeword y1 by projecting the residual signal 
1135 R = X - p' onto the codebook pyramid of K-1 pulses:
1136 </t>
1137 <t>
1138 y0 = round_towards_zero( (K-1) * R / sum(abs(R)))
1139 </t>
1140
1141 <t>
1142 Depending on N, K and the input data, the initial codeword y0 may contain from 
1143 0 to K-1 non-zero values. All the remaining pulses, with the exception of the last one, 
1144 are found iteratively with a greedy search that minimizes the normalized correlation
1145 between y and R:
1146 </t>
1147
1148 <t>
1149 J = -R^T*y / ||y||
1150 </t>
1151
1152 <t>
1153 The search described above is considered to be a good trade-off between quality
1154 and computational cost. However, there are other possible ways to search the PVQ
1155 codebook and the implementors MAY use any other search methods.
1156 </t>
1157 </section>
1158
1159
1160 <section anchor="cwrs-encoding" title="Index Encoding">
1161 <t>
1162 The best PVQ codeword is encoded as a uniformly-distributed integer value
1163 by encode_pulses() (cwrs.c).
1164 The codeword is converted to a unique index in the same way as specified in 
1165 <xref target="PVQ"></xref>. The indexing is based on the calculation of V(N,K) (denoted N(L,K) in <xref target="PVQ"></xref>), which is the number of possible combinations of K pulses 
1166 in N samples. The number of combinations can be computed recursively as 
1167 V(N,K) = V(N+1,K) + V(N,K+1) + V(N+1,K+1), with V(N,0) = 1 and V(0,K) = 0, K != 0. 
1168 There are many different ways to compute V(N,K), including pre-computed tables and direct
1169 use of the recursive formulation. The reference implementation applies the recursive
1170 formulation one line (or column) at a time to save on memory use,
1171 along with an alternate,
1172 univariate recurrence to initialise an arbitrary line, and direct
1173 polynomial solutions for small N. All of these methods are
1174 equivalent, and have different trade-offs in speed, memory usage, and
1175 code size. Implementations MAY use any methods they like, as long as
1176 they are equivalent to the mathematical definition.
1177 </t>
1178
1179 <t>
1180 The indexing computations are performed using 32-bit unsigned integers. For large codebooks,
1181 32-bit integers are not sufficient. Instead of using 64-bit integers (or more), the encoding
1182 is made slightly sub-optimal by splitting each band into two equal (or near-equal) vectors of
1183 size (N+1)/2 and N/2, respectively. The number of pulses in the first half, K1, is first encoded as an
1184 integer in the range [0,K]. Then, two codebooks are encoded with V((N+1)/2, K1) and V(N/2, K-K1). 
1185 The split operation is performed recursively, in case one (or both) of the split vectors 
1186 still requires more than 32 bits. For compatibility reasons, the handling of codebooks of more 
1187 than 32 bits MUST be implemented with the splitting method, even if 64-bit arithmetic is available.
1188 </t>
1189 </section>
1190
1191 </section>
1192
1193
1194 <section anchor="stereo" title="Stereo support">
1195 <t>
1196 When encoding a stereo stream, some parameters are shared across the left and right channels, while others are transmitted separately for each channel, or jointly encoded. Only one copy of the flags for the features, transients and pitch (pitch period and gains) are transmitted. The coarse and fine energy parameters are transmitted separately for each channel. Both the coarse energy and fine energy (including the remaining fine bits at the end of the stream) have the left and right bands interleaved in the stream, with the left band encoded first.
1197 </t>
1198
1199 <t>
1200 The main difference between mono and stereo coding is the PVQ coding of the normalized vectors. In stereo mode, a normalized mid-side (M-S) encoding is used. Let L and R be the normalized vector of a certain band for the left and right channels, respectively. The mid and side vectors are computed as M=L+R and S=L-R and no longer have unit norm.
1201 </t>
1202
1203 <t>
1204 From M and S, an angular parameter theta=2/pi*atan2(||S||, ||M||) is computed. The theta parameter is converted to a Q14 fixed-point parameter itheta, which is quantized on a scale from 0 to 1 with an interval of 2^-qb, where qb = (b-2*(N-1)*(40-log2_frac(N,4)))/(32*(N-1)), b is the number of bits allocated to the band, and log2_frac() is defined in cwrs.c. From here on, the value of itheta MUST be treated in a bit-exact manner since 
1205 both the encoder and decoder rely on it to infer the bit allocation.
1206 </t>
1207 <t>
1208 Let m=M/||M|| and s=S/||S||; m and s are separately encoded with the PVQ encoder described in <xref target="pvq"></xref>. The number of bits allocated to m and s depends on the value of itheta. The number of bits allocated to coding m is obtained by:
1209 </t>
1210
1211 <t>
1212 <list>
1213 <t>imid = bitexact_cos(itheta);</t>
1214 <t>iside = bitexact_cos(16384-itheta);</t>
1215 <t>delta = (N-1)*(log2_frac(iside,6)-log2_frac(imid,6))>>2;</t>
1216 <t>qalloc = log2_frac((1&lt;&lt;qb)+1,4);</t>
1217 <t>mbits = (b-qalloc/2-delta)/2;</t>
1218 </list>
1219 </t>
1220
1221 <t>where bitexact_cos() is a fixed-point cosine approximation that MUST be bit-exact with the reference implementation
1222 in mathops.h. The spectral folding operation is performed independently for the mid and side vectors.</t>
1223 </section>
1224
1225
1226 <section anchor="synthesis" title="Synthesis">
1227 <t>
1228 After all the quantization is completed, the quantized energy is used along with the 
1229 quantized normalized band data to resynthesize the MDCT spectrum. The inverse MDCT (<xref target="inverse-mdct"></xref>) and the weighted overlap-add are applied and the signal is stored in the <spanx style="emph">synthesis buffer</spanx> so it can be used for pitch prediction. 
1230 The encoder MAY omit this step of the processing if it knows that it will not be using
1231 the pitch predictor for the next few frames. If the de-emphasis filter (<xref target="inverse-mdct"></xref>) is applied to this resynthesized
1232 signal, then the output will be the same (within numerical precision) as the decoder's output. 
1233 </t>
1234 </section>
1235
1236 <section anchor="vbr" title="Variable Bitrate (VBR)">
1237 <t>
1238 Each CELT frame can be encoded in a different number of octets, making it possible to vary the bitrate at will. This property can be used to implement source-controlled variable bitrate (VBR). Support for VBR is OPTIONAL for the encoder, but a decoder MUST be prepared to decode a stream that changes its bit-rate dynamically. The method used to vary the bit-rate in VBR mode is left to the implementor, as long as each frame can be decoded by the reference decoder.
1239 </t>
1240 </section>
1241
1242 </section>
1243
1244 </section>
1245
1246 <section title="Opus Decoder">
1247 <t>
1248 Opus decoder block diagram.
1249 <figure>
1250 <artwork>
1251 ![CDATA[
1252                        +-------+    +----------+
1253                        | SILK  |    |  sample  |
1254                     +->|encoder|--->|   rate   |----+
1255 bit-    +-------+   |  |       |    |conversion|    v
1256 stream  | Range |---+  +-------+    +----------+  /---\  audio
1257 ------->|decoder|                                 | + |------>
1258         |       |---+  +-------+                  \---/
1259         +-------+   |  | CELT  |                    ^
1260                     +->|decoder|--------------------+
1261                        |       |
1262                        +-------+
1263 ]]>
1264 </artwork>
1265 </figure>
1266 </t>
1267
1268 <section anchor="range-decoder" title="Range Decoder">
1269 <t>
1270 The range decoder extracts the symbols and integers encoded using the range encoder in
1271 <xref target="range-encoder"></xref>. The range decoder maintains an internal
1272 state vector composed of the two-tuple (dif,rng), representing the
1273 difference between the high end of the current range and the actual
1274 coded value, and the size of the current range, respectively. Both
1275 dif and rng are 32-bit unsigned integer values. rng is initialized to
1276 2^7. dif is initialized to rng minus the top 7 bits of the first
1277 input octet. Then the range is immediately normalized, using the
1278 procedure described in the following section.
1279 </t>
1280
1281 <section anchor="decoding-symbols" title="Decoding Symbols">
1282 <t>
1283    Decoding symbols is a two-step process. The first step determines
1284    a value fs that lies within the range of some symbol in the current
1285    context. The second step updates the range decoder state with the
1286    three-tuple (fl,fh,ft) corresponding to that symbol, as defined in
1287    <xref target="encoding-symbols"></xref>.
1288 </t>
1289 <t>
1290    The first step is implemented by ec_decode() 
1291    (rangedec.c), 
1292    and computes fs = ft-min((dif-1)/(rng/ft)+1,ft), where ft is
1293    the sum of the frequency counts in the current context, as described
1294    in <xref target="encoding-symbols"></xref>. The divisions here are exact integer division. 
1295 </t>
1296 <t>
1297    In the reference implementation, a special version of ec_decode()
1298    called ec_decode_bin() (rangeenc.c) is defined using
1299    the parameter ftb instead of ft. It is mathematically equivalent to
1300    calling ec_decode() with ft = (1&lt;&lt;ftb), but avoids one of the
1301    divisions.
1302 </t>
1303 <t>
1304    The decoder then identifies the symbol in the current context
1305    corresponding to fs; i.e., the one whose three-tuple (fl,fh,ft)
1306    satisfies fl &lt;= fs &lt; fh. This tuple is used to update the decoder
1307    state according to dif = dif - (rng/ft)*(ft-fh), and if fl is greater
1308    than zero, rng = (rng/ft)*(fh-fl), or otherwise rng = rng - (rng/ft)*(ft-fh). After this update, the range is normalized.
1309 </t>
1310 <t>
1311    To normalize the range, the following process is repeated until
1312    rng > 2^23. First, rng is set to (rng&lt;8)&amp;0xFFFFFFFF. Then the next
1313    8 bits of input are read into sym, using the remaining bit from the
1314    previous input octet as the high bit of sym, and the top 7 bits of the
1315    next octet for the remaining bits of sym. If no more input octets
1316    remain, zero bits are used instead. Then, dif is set to
1317    (dif&lt;&lt;8)-sym&amp;0xFFFFFFFF (i.e., using wrap-around if the subtraction
1318    overflows a 32-bit register). Finally, if dif is larger than 2^31,
1319    dif is then set to dif - 2^31. This process is carried out by
1320    ec_dec_normalize() (rangedec.c).
1321 </t>
1322 </section>
1323
1324 <section anchor="decoding-ints" title="Decoding Uniformly Distributed Integers">
1325 <t>
1326    Functions ec_dec_uint() or ec_dec_bits() are based on ec_decode() and
1327    decode one of N equiprobable symbols, each with a frequency of 1,
1328    where N may be as large as 2^32-1. Because ec_decode() is limited to
1329    a total frequency of 2^16-1, this is done by decoding a series of
1330    symbols in smaller contexts.
1331 </t>
1332 <t>
1333    ec_dec_bits() (entdec.c) is defined, like
1334    ec_decode_bin(), to take a single parameter ftb, with ftb &lt; 32.
1335    and ftb &lt; 32, and produces an ftb-bit decoded integer value, t,
1336    initialized to zero. While ftb is greater than 8, it decodes the next
1337    8 most significant bits of the integer, s = ec_decode_bin(8), updates
1338    the decoder state with the 3-tuple (s,s+1,256), adds those bits to
1339    the current value of t, t = t&lt;&lt;8 | s, and subtracts 8 from ftb. Then
1340    it decodes the remaining bits of the integer, s = ec_decode_bin(ftb),
1341    updates the decoder state with the 3 tuple (s,s+1,1&lt;&lt;ftb), and adds
1342    those bits to the final values of t, t = t&lt;&lt;ftb | s.
1343 </t>
1344 <t>
1345    ec_dec_uint() (entdec.c) takes a single parameter,
1346    ft, which is not necessarily a power of two, and returns an integer,
1347    t, with a value between 0 and ft-1, inclusive, which is initialized to zero. Let
1348    ftb be the location of the highest 1 bit in the two's-complement
1349    representation of (ft-1), or -1 if no bits are set. If ftb>8, then
1350    the top 8 bits of t are decoded using t = ec_decode((ft-1>>ftb-8)+1),
1351    the decoder state is updated with the three-tuple
1352    (s,s+1,(ft-1>>ftb-8)+1), and the remaining bits are decoded with
1353    t = t&lt;&lt;ftb-8|ec_dec_bits(ftb-8). If, at this point, t >= ft, then
1354    the current frame is corrupt, and decoding should stop. If the
1355    original value of ftb was not greater than 8, then t is decoded with
1356    t = ec_decode(ft), and the decoder state is updated with the
1357    three-tuple (t,t+1,ft).
1358 </t>
1359 </section>
1360
1361 <section anchor="decoder-tell" title="Current Bit Usage">
1362 <t>
1363    The bit allocation routines in CELT need to be able to determine a
1364    conservative upper bound on the number of bits that have been used
1365    to decode from the current frame thus far. This drives allocation
1366    decisions which must match those made in the encoder. This is
1367    computed in the reference implementation to fractional bit precision
1368    by the function ec_dec_tell() (rangedec.c). Like all
1369    operations in the range decoder, it must be implemented in a
1370    bit-exact manner, and must produce exactly the same value returned by
1371    ec_enc_tell() after encoding the same symbols.
1372 </t>
1373 </section>
1374
1375 </section>
1376
1377       <section anchor='outline_decoder' title='SILK Decoder'>
1378         <t>
1379           At the receiving end, the received packets are by the range decoder split into a number of frames contained in the packet. Each of which contains the necessary information to reconstruct a 20 ms frame of the output signal.
1380         </t>
1381         <section title="Decoder Modules">
1382           <t>
1383             An overview of the decoder is given in <xref target="decoder_figure" />.
1384             <figure align="center" anchor="decoder_figure">
1385               <artwork align="center">
1386                 <![CDATA[
1387    
1388    +---------+    +------------+    
1389 -->| Range   |--->| Decode     |---------------------------+
1390  1 | Decoder | 2  | Parameters |----------+       5        |
1391    +---------+    +------------+     4    |                |
1392                        3 |                |                |
1393                         \/               \/               \/
1394                   +------------+   +------------+   +------------+
1395                   | Generate   |-->| LTP        |-->| LPC        |-->
1396                   | Excitation |   | Synthesis  |   | Synthesis  | 6
1397                   +------------+   +------------+   +------------+
1398
1399 1: Range encoded bitstream
1400 2: Coded parameters
1401 3: Pulses and gains
1402 4: Pitch lags and LTP coefficients
1403 5: LPC coefficients
1404 6: Decoded signal
1405 ]]>
1406               </artwork>
1407               <postamble>Decoder block diagram.</postamble>
1408             </figure>
1409           </t>
1410
1411           <section title='Range Decoder'>
1412             <t>
1413               The range decoder decodes the encoded parameters from the received bitstream. Output from this function includes the pulses and gains for the excitation signal generation, as well as LTP and LSF codebook indices, which are needed for decoding LTP and LPC coefficients needed for LTP and LPC synthesis filtering the excitation signal, respectively.
1414             </t>
1415           </section>
1416
1417           <section title='Decode Parameters'>
1418             <t>
1419               Pulses and gains are decoded from the parameters that was decoded by the range decoder.
1420             </t>
1421
1422             <t>
1423               When a voiced frame is decoded and LTP codebook selection and indices are received, LTP coefficients are decoded using the selected codebook by choosing the vector that corresponds to the given codebook index in that codebook. This is done for each of the four subframes.
1424               The LPC coefficients are decoded from the LSF codebook by first adding the chosen vectors, one vector from each stage of the codebook. The resulting LSF vector is stabilized using the same method that was used in the encoder, see
1425               <xref target='lsf_stabilizer_overview_section' />. The LSF coefficients are then converted to LPC coefficients, and passed on to the LPC synthesis filter.
1426             </t>
1427           </section>
1428
1429           <section title='Generate Excitation'>
1430             <t>
1431               The pulses signal is multiplied with the quantization gain to create the excitation signal.
1432             </t>
1433           </section>
1434
1435           <section title='LTP Synthesis'>
1436             <t>
1437               For voiced speech, the excitation signal e(n) is input to an LTP synthesis filter that will recreate the long term correlation that was removed in the LTP analysis filter and generate an LPC excitation signal e_LPC(n), according to
1438               <figure align="center">
1439                 <artwork align="center">
1440                   <![CDATA[
1441                    d
1442                   __
1443 e_LPC(n) = e(n) + \  e(n - L - i) * b_i,
1444                   /_
1445                  i=-d
1446 ]]>
1447                 </artwork>
1448               </figure>
1449               using the pitch lag L, and the decoded LTP coefficients b_i.
1450
1451               For unvoiced speech, the output signal is simply a copy of the excitation signal, i.e., e_LPC(n) = e(n).
1452             </t>
1453           </section>
1454
1455           <section title='LPC Synthesis'>
1456             <t>
1457               In a similar manner, the short-term correlation that was removed in the LPC analysis filter is recreated in the LPC synthesis filter. The LPC excitation signal e_LPC(n) is filtered using the LTP coefficients a_i, according to
1458               <figure align="center">
1459                 <artwork align="center">
1460                   <![CDATA[
1461                  d_LPC
1462                   __
1463 y(n) = e_LPC(n) + \  e_LPC(n - i) * a_i,
1464                   /_
1465                   i=1
1466 ]]>
1467                 </artwork>
1468               </figure>
1469               where d_LPC is the LPC synthesis filter order, and y(n) is the decoded output signal.
1470             </t>
1471           </section>
1472         </section>
1473       </section>
1474
1475
1476 <section title="CELT Decoder">
1477 <t>
1478 Insert decoder figure.
1479 </t>
1480
1481 <t>
1482 The decoder extracts information from the range-coded bit-stream in the same order
1483 as it was encoded by the encoder. In some circumstances, it is 
1484 possible for a decoded value to be out of range due to a very small amount of redundancy
1485 in the encoding of large integers by the range coder.
1486 In that case, the decoder should assume there has been an error in the coding, 
1487 decoding, or transmission and SHOULD take measures to conceal the error and/or report
1488 to the application that a problem has occurred.
1489 </t>
1490
1491 <section anchor="energy-decoding" title="Energy Envelope Decoding">
1492 <t>
1493 The energy of each band is extracted from the bit-stream in two steps according
1494 to the same coarse-fine strategy used in the encoder. First, the coarse energy is
1495 decoded in unquant_coarse_energy() (quant_bands.c)
1496 based on the probability of the Laplace model used by the encoder.
1497 </t>
1498
1499 <t>
1500 After the coarse energy is decoded, the same allocation function as used in the
1501 encoder is called. This determines the number of
1502 bits to decode for the fine energy quantization. The decoding of the fine energy bits
1503 is performed by unquant_fine_energy() (quant_bands.c).
1504 Finally, like the encoder, the remaining bits in the stream (that would otherwise go unused)
1505 are decoded using unquant_energy_finalise() (quant_bands.c).
1506 </t>
1507 </section>
1508
1509 <section anchor="pitch-decoding" title="Pitch prediction decoding">
1510 <t>
1511 If the pitch bit is set, then the pitch period is extracted from the bit-stream. The pitch
1512 gain bits are extracted within the PVQ decoding as encoded by the encoder. When the folding
1513 bit is set, the folding prediction is computed in exactly the same way as the encoder, 
1514 with the same gain, by the function intra_fold() (vq.c).
1515 </t>
1516
1517 </section>
1518
1519 <section anchor="PVQ-decoder" title="Spherical VQ Decoder">
1520 <t>
1521 In order to correctly decode the PVQ codewords, the decoder must perform exactly the same
1522 bits to pulses conversion as the encoder.
1523 </t>
1524
1525 <section anchor="cwrs-decoder" title="Index Decoding">
1526 <t>
1527 The decoding of the codeword from the index is performed as specified in 
1528 <xref target="PVQ"></xref>, as implemented in function
1529 decode_pulses() (cwrs.c).
1530 </t>
1531 </section>
1532
1533 <section anchor="normalised-decoding" title="Normalised Vector Decoding">
1534 <t>
1535 The spherical codebook is decoded by alg_unquant() (vq.c).
1536 The index of the PVQ entry is obtained from the range coder and converted to 
1537 a pulse vector by decode_pulses() (cwrs.c).
1538 </t>
1539
1540 <t>The decoded normalized vector for each band is equal to</t>
1541 <t>X' = y/||y||,</t>
1542
1543 <t>
1544 This operation is implemented in mix_pitch_and_residual() (vq.c), 
1545 which is the same function as used in the encoder.
1546 </t>
1547 </section>
1548
1549
1550 </section>
1551
1552 <section anchor="denormalization" title="Denormalization">
1553 <t>
1554 Just like each band was normalized in the encoder, the last step of the decoder before
1555 the inverse MDCT is to denormalize the bands. Each decoded normalized band is
1556 multiplied by the square root of the decoded energy. This is done by denormalise_bands()
1557 (bands.c).
1558 </t>
1559 </section>
1560
1561 <section anchor="inverse-mdct" title="Inverse MDCT">
1562 <t>The inverse MDCT implementation has no special characteristics. The
1563 input is N frequency-domain samples and the output is 2*N time-domain 
1564 samples, while scaling by 1/2. The output is windowed using the same window 
1565 as the encoder. The IMDCT and windowing are performed by mdct_backward
1566 (mdct.c). If a time-domain pre-emphasis 
1567 window was applied in the encoder, the (inverse) time-domain de-emphasis window
1568 is applied on the IMDCT result. After the overlap-add process, 
1569 the signal is de-emphasized using the inverse of the pre-emphasis filter 
1570 used in the encoder: 1/A(z)=1/(1-alpha_p*z^-1).
1571 </t>
1572
1573 </section>
1574
1575 <section anchor="Packet Loss Concealment" title="Packet Loss Concealment (PLC)">
1576 <t>
1577 Packet loss concealment (PLC) is an optional decoder-side feature which 
1578 SHOULD be included when transmitting over an unreliable channel. Because 
1579 PLC is not part of the bit-stream, there are several possible ways to 
1580 implement PLC with different complexity/quality trade-offs. The PLC in
1581 the reference implementation finds a periodicity in the decoded
1582 signal and repeats the windowed waveform using the pitch offset. The windowed
1583 waveform is overlapped in such a way as to preserve the time-domain aliasing
1584 cancellation with the previous frame and the next frame. This is implemented 
1585 in celt_decode_lost() (mdct.c).
1586 </t>
1587 </section>
1588
1589 </section>
1590
1591 </section>
1592
1593 <section title="Conformance">
1594
1595 <t>
1596 It is the intention to allow the greatest possible choice of freedom in 
1597 implementing the specification. For this reason, outside of a few exceptions
1598 noted in this section, conformance is defined through the reference
1599 implementation of the decoder provided in Appendix <xref target="ref-implementation"></xref>.
1600 Although this document includes an English description of the codec, should 
1601 the description contradict the source code of the reference implementation, 
1602 the latter shall take precedence.
1603 </t>
1604
1605 <t>
1606 Compliance with this specification means that a decoder's output MUST be
1607 <spanx style="emph">close enough</spanx> to the output of the reference
1608 implementation. This is measured using the opus_compare.m tool provided in
1609 Appendix <xref target="opus-compare"></xref>.
1610 </t>
1611 </section>
1612
1613 <section anchor="security" title="Security Considerations">
1614
1615 <t>
1616 The codec needs to take appropriate security considerations 
1617 into account, as outlined in <xref target="DOS"/> and <xref target="SECGUIDE"/>.
1618 It is extremely important for the decoder to be robust against malicious
1619 payloads. Malicious payloads must not cause the decoder to overrun its
1620 allocated memory or to take much more resources to decode. Although problems
1621 in encoders are typically rarer, the same applies to the encoder. Malicious
1622 audio stream must not cause the encoder to misbehave because this would
1623 allow an attacker to attack transcoding gateways.
1624 </t>
1625 <t>
1626 The reference implementation contains no known buffer overflow or cases where
1627 a specially crafter packet or audio segment could cause a significant increase
1628 in CPU load. However, on certain CPU architectures where denormalized 
1629 floating-point operations result and handled through exceptions, it is possible
1630 for some audio content (e.g. silence or near-silence) to cause such an increase
1631 in CPU load. For such architectures, it is RECOMMENDED to add very small
1632 floating-point offsets to prevent significant numbers of denormalized
1633 operations. No such issue exists for the fixed-point reference implementation.
1634 </t>
1635 </section> 
1636
1637
1638 <section title="IANA Considerations ">
1639 <t>
1640 This document has no actions for IANA.
1641 </t>
1642 </section>
1643
1644 <section anchor="Acknowledgments" title="Acknowledgments">
1645 <t>
1646 Thanks to all other developers, including Raymond Chen, Soeren Skak Jensen, Gregory Maxwell, 
1647 Christopher Montgomery, Karsten Vandborg Soerensen, and Timothy Terriberry.
1648 </t>
1649 </section> 
1650
1651 </middle>
1652
1653 <back>
1654
1655 <references title="Informative References">
1656
1657 <reference anchor='SILK'>
1658 <front>
1659 <title>SILK Speech Codec</title>
1660 <author initials='K.' surname='Vos' fullname='K. Vos'>
1661 <organization /></author>
1662 <author initials='S.' surname='Jensen' fullname='S. Jensen'>
1663 <organization /></author>
1664 <author initials='K.' surname='Soerensen' fullname='K. Soerensen'>
1665 <organization /></author>
1666 <date year='2010' month='March' />
1667 <abstract>
1668 <t></t>
1669 </abstract></front>
1670 <seriesInfo name='Internet-Draft' value='draft-vos-silk-01' />
1671 <format type='TXT' target='http://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-vos-silk-01' />
1672 </reference>
1673
1674       <reference anchor="laroia-icassp">
1675         <front>
1676           <title abbrev="Robust and Efficient Quantization of Speech LSP">
1677             Robust and Efficient Quantization of Speech LSP Parameters Using Structured Vector Quantization
1678           </title>
1679           <author initials="R.L." surname="Laroia" fullname="R.">
1680             <organization/>
1681           </author>
1682           <author initials="N.P." surname="Phamdo" fullname="N.">
1683             <organization/>
1684           </author>
1685           <author initials="N.F." surname="Farvardin" fullname="N.">
1686             <organization/>
1687           </author>
1688         </front>
1689         <seriesInfo name="ICASSP-1991, Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Acoust., Speech, Signal Processing, pp. 641-644, October" value="1991"/>
1690       </reference>
1691
1692       <reference anchor="sinervo-norsig">
1693         <front>
1694           <title abbrev="SVQ versus MSVQ">Evaluation of Split and Multistage Techniques in LSF Quantization</title>
1695           <author initials="U.S." surname="Sinervo" fullname="Ulpu Sinervo">
1696             <organization/>
1697           </author>
1698           <author initials="J.N." surname="Nurminen" fullname="Jani Nurminen">
1699             <organization/>
1700           </author>
1701           <author initials="A.H." surname="Heikkinen" fullname="Ari Heikkinen">
1702             <organization/>
1703           </author>
1704           <author initials="J.S." surname="Saarinen" fullname="Jukka Saarinen">
1705             <organization/>
1706           </author>
1707         </front>
1708         <seriesInfo name="NORSIG-2001, Norsk symposium i signalbehandling, Trondheim, Norge, October" value="2001"/>
1709       </reference>
1710
1711       <reference anchor="leblanc-tsap">
1712         <front>
1713           <title>Efficient Search and Design Procedures for Robust Multi-Stage VQ of LPC Parameters for 4 kb/s Speech Coding</title>
1714           <author initials="W.P." surname="LeBlanc" fullname="">
1715             <organization/>
1716           </author>
1717           <author initials="B." surname="Bhattacharya" fullname="">
1718             <organization/>
1719           </author>
1720           <author initials="S.A." surname="Mahmoud" fullname="">
1721             <organization/>
1722           </author>
1723           <author initials="V." surname="Cuperman" fullname="">
1724             <organization/>
1725           </author>
1726         </front>
1727         <seriesInfo name="IEEE Transactions on Speech and Audio Processing, Vol. 1, No. 4, October" value="1993" />
1728       </reference>
1729
1730 <reference anchor='CELT'>
1731 <front>
1732 <title>Constrained-Energy Lapped Transform (CELT) Codec</title>
1733 <author initials='J-M.' surname='Valin' fullname='J-M. Valin'>
1734 <organization /></author>
1735 <author initials='T.' surname='Terriberry' fullname='T. Terriberry'>
1736 <organization /></author>
1737 <author initials='G.' surname='Maxwell' fullname='G. Maxwell'>
1738 <organization /></author>
1739 <author initials='C.' surname='Montgomery' fullname='C. Montgomery'>
1740 <organization /></author>
1741 <date year='2010' month='July' />
1742 <abstract>
1743 <t></t>
1744 </abstract></front>
1745 <seriesInfo name='Internet-Draft' value='draft-valin-celt-codec-02' />
1746 <format type='TXT' target='http://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-valin-celt-codec-02' />
1747 </reference>
1748
1749 <reference anchor='DOS'>
1750 <front>
1751 <title>Internet Denial-of-Service Considerations</title>
1752 <author initials='M.' surname='Handley' fullname='M. Handley'>
1753 <organization /></author>
1754 <author initials='E.' surname='Rescorla' fullname='E. Rescorla'>
1755 <organization /></author>
1756 <author>
1757 <organization>IAB</organization></author>
1758 <date year='2006' month='December' />
1759 <abstract>
1760 <t>This document provides an overview of possible avenues for denial-of-service (DoS) attack on Internet systems.  The aim is to encourage protocol designers and network engineers towards designs that are more robust.  We discuss partial solutions that reduce the effectiveness of attacks, and how some solutions might inadvertently open up alternative vulnerabilities.  This memo provides information for the Internet community.</t></abstract></front>
1761 <seriesInfo name='RFC' value='4732' />
1762 <format type='TXT' octets='91844' target='ftp://ftp.isi.edu/in-notes/rfc4732.txt' />
1763 </reference>
1764
1765 <reference anchor='SECGUIDE'>
1766 <front>
1767 <title>Guidelines for Writing RFC Text on Security Considerations</title>
1768 <author initials='E.' surname='Rescorla' fullname='E. Rescorla'>
1769 <organization /></author>
1770 <author initials='B.' surname='Korver' fullname='B. Korver'>
1771 <organization /></author>
1772 <date year='2003' month='July' />
1773 <abstract>
1774 <t>All RFCs are required to have a Security Considerations section.  Historically, such sections have been relatively weak.  This document provides guidelines to RFC authors on how to write a good Security Considerations section.  This document specifies an Internet Best Current Practices for the Internet Community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.</t></abstract></front>
1775
1776 <seriesInfo name='BCP' value='72' />
1777 <seriesInfo name='RFC' value='3552' />
1778 <format type='TXT' octets='110393' target='ftp://ftp.isi.edu/in-notes/rfc3552.txt' />
1779 </reference>
1780
1781 <reference anchor="range-coding">
1782 <front>
1783 <title>Range encoding: An algorithm for removing redundancy from a digitised message</title>
1784 <author initials="G." surname="Nigel" fullname=""><organization/></author>
1785 <author initials="N." surname="Martin" fullname=""><organization/></author>
1786 <date year="1979" />
1787 </front>
1788 <seriesInfo name="Proc. Institution of Electronic and Radio Engineers International Conference on Video and Data Recording" value="" />
1789 </reference> 
1790
1791 <reference anchor="coding-thesis">
1792 <front>
1793 <title>Source coding algorithms for fast data compression</title>
1794 <author initials="R." surname="Pasco" fullname=""><organization/></author>
1795 <date month="May" year="1976" />
1796 </front>
1797 <seriesInfo name="Ph.D. thesis" value="Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University" />
1798 </reference>
1799
1800 <reference anchor="PVQ">
1801 <front>
1802 <title>A Pyramid Vector Quantizer</title>
1803 <author initials="T." surname="Fischer" fullname=""><organization/></author>
1804 <date month="July" year="1986" />
1805 </front>
1806 <seriesInfo name="IEEE Trans. on Information Theory, Vol. 32" value="pp. 568-583" />
1807 </reference> 
1808
1809 </references> 
1810
1811 <section anchor="ref-implementation" title="Reference Implementation">
1812
1813 <t>This appendix contains the complete source code for the
1814 reference implementation of the Opus codec written in C. This
1815 implementation can be compiled for 
1816 either floating-point or fixed-point architectures.
1817 </t>
1818
1819 <t>The implementation can be compiled with either a C89 or a C99
1820 compiler. It is reasonably optimized for most platforms such that
1821 only architecture-specific optimizations are likely to be useful.
1822 The FFT used is a slightly modified version of the KISS-FFT package,
1823 but it is easy to substitute any other FFT library.
1824 </t>
1825
1826 <section title="Extracting the source">
1827 <t>
1828 The complete source code can be extracted from this draft, by running the
1829 following command line:
1830
1831 <list style="symbols">
1832 <t><![CDATA[
1833 cat draft-ietf-codec-opus.txt | grep '^\ \ \ ###' | sed 's/\s\s\s###//' | base64 -d > opus_source.tar.gz
1834 ]]></t>
1835 <t>
1836 tar xzvf opus_source.tar.gz
1837 </t>
1838 <t>cd opus_source</t>
1839 <t>make</t>
1840 </list>
1841
1842 </t>
1843 </section>
1844
1845 <section title="Base64-encoded source code">
1846 <t>
1847 <?rfc include="opus_source.base64"?>
1848 </t>
1849 </section>
1850
1851 </section>
1852
1853 <section anchor="opus-compare" title="opus_compare.m">
1854 <t>
1855 <?rfc include="opus_compare_escaped.m"?>
1856 </t>
1857 </section>
1858
1859 </back>
1860
1861 </rfc>