Updated draft
[speexdsp.git] / doc / draft-herlein-speex-rtp-profile-03.xml
1 <?xml version='1.0'?>
2 <!DOCTYPE rfc SYSTEM 'rfc2629.dtd'>
3 <?rfc toc="yes" ?>
4
5 <rfc ipr="full3667" docName="RTP Payload Format for the Speex Codec">
6
7 <front>
8 <title>draft-herlein-speex-rtp-profile-03</title>
9
10 <author initials="G" surname="Herlein" fullname="Greg Herlein">
11 <organization></organization>
12 <address>
13 <email>gherlein@herlein.com</email>
14 <postal>
15 <street>2034 Filbert Street</street>
16 <city>San Francisco</city> 
17 <region>California</region>
18 <code>94123</code>
19 <country>United States</country> 
20 </postal>
21 </address>
22 </author>
23
24 <author initials="S" surname="Morlat" fullname="Simon Morlat">
25 <address>
26 <email>simon.morlat@linphone.org</email>
27 <postal>
28 <street>35, av de Vizille App 42</street>
29 <city>Grenoble</city>
30 <code>38000</code>
31 <country>France</country>
32 </postal>
33 </address>
34 </author>
35
36 <author initials="J" surname="Jean-Marc" fullname="Jean-Marc Valin">
37 <address>
38 <email>jean-marc.valin@hermes.usherb.ca</email>
39 <postal>
40 <street>Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering</street>
41 <street>University of Sherbrooke</street>
42 <street>2500 blvd Universite</street>
43 <city>Sherbrooke</city>
44 <region>Quebec</region>
45 <code>J1K 2R1</code>
46 <country>Canada</country>
47 </postal>
48 </address>
49 </author>
50
51 <author initials="R" surname="Hardiman" fullname="Roger Hardiman">
52 <address>
53 <email>roger@freebsd.org</email>
54 <postal>
55 <street>49 Nettleton Road</street>
56 <city>Cheltenham</city>
57 <region>Gloucestershire</region>
58 <code>GL51 6NR</code>
59 <country>England</country>
60 </postal>
61 </address>
62 </author>
63
64
65 <author initials="P" surname="Kerr" fullname="Phil Kerr">
66 <address>
67 <email>phil@plus24.com</email>
68 <postal>
69 <country>England</country>
70 </postal>
71 </address>
72 </author>
73
74 <date day="01" month="January" year="2005" />
75
76 <area>General</area>
77 <workgroup>AVT Working Group</workgroup>
78 <keyword>I-D</keyword>
79
80 <keyword>Internet-Draft</keyword>
81 <keyword>Speex</keyword>
82 <keyword>RTP</keyword>
83 <abstract>
84 <t>
85 Speex is an open-source voice codec suitable for use in Voice over
86 IP (VoIP) type applications.  This document describes the payload
87 format for Speex generated bit streams within an RTP packet.  Also
88 included here are the necessary details for the use of Speex with
89 the Session Description Protocol (SDP) and a preliminary method of
90 using Speex within H.323 applications.
91 </t>
92 </abstract>
93 </front>
94
95 <middle>
96
97 <section anchor="Conventions used in this document" title="Conventions used in this document">
98 <t>
99 The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
100 "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
101 document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 <xref target="rfc2119"></xref>.
102 </t>
103 </section>
104
105 <section anchor="Overview of the Speex Codec" title="Overview of the Speex Codec">
106
107 <t>
108 Speex is based on the CELP <xref target="CELP"></xref> encoding technique with support for 
109 either narrowband (nominal 8kHz), wideband (nominal 16kHz) or 
110 ultra-wideband (nominal 32kHz), and (non-optimal) rates up to 48 kHz 
111 sampling also available.  The main characteristics can be summarized 
112 as follows:
113 </t>
114
115 <t>
116 <list style="symbols">
117 <t>Free software/open-source</t>
118 <t>Integration of wideband and narrowband in the same bit-stream</t>
119 <t>Wide range of bit-rates available</t>
120 <t>Dynamic bit-rate switching and variable bit-rate (VBR)</t>
121 <t>Voice Activity Detection (VAD, integrated with VBR)</t>
122 <t>Variable complexity</t>
123 </list>
124 </t>
125
126 </section>
127
128 <section anchor="RTP payload format for Speex" title="RTP payload format for Speex">
129
130 <t>
131 For RTP based transportation of Speex encoded audio the standard 
132 RTP header [2] is followed by one or more payload data blocks. 
133 An optional padding terminator may also be used. 
134 </t>
135 <artwork><![CDATA[
136       0                   1                   2                   3
137       0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
138      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
139      |                         RTP Header                            |
140      +=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+
141      |                 one or more frames of Speex ....              |
142      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
143      |        one or more frames of Speex ....       |    padding    |
144      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
145 ]]></artwork>
146
147 </section>
148
149 <section anchor="RTP Header" title="RTP Header">
150
151 <artwork><![CDATA[
152       0                   1                   2                   3
153       0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
154      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
155      |V=2|P|X|  CC   |M|     PT      |       sequence number         |
156      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
157      |                           timestamp                           |
158      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
159      |           synchronization source (SSRC) identifier            |
160      +=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+
161      |            contributing source (CSRC) identifiers             |
162      |                              ...                              |
163      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
164 ]]></artwork>
165
166 <t>
167 The RTP header begins with an octet of fields (V, P, X, and CC) to   
168 support specialized RTP uses (see <xref target="rfc3550"></xref> and <xref target="rfc3551"></xref> for details). For 
169 Speex the following values are used.
170 </t>
171
172 <t>Version (V): 2 bits</t><t>
173    This field identifies the version of RTP. The version
174    used by this specification is two <xref target="rfc3550"></xref>.
175 </t>
176
177 <t>Padding (P): 1 bit</t><t>
178       If the padding bit is set, the packet contains one or more
179       additional padding octets at the end which are not part of
180       the payload.  P is set if the total packet size is less than 
181       the MTU.  
182 </t>
183
184 <t>Extension (X): 1 bit</t><t>
185       If the extension, X, bit is set, the fixed header MUST be 
186       followed by exactly one header extension, with a format defined 
187       in Section 5.3.1. of <xref target="rfc3550"></xref>. 
188 </t>
189
190 <t>CSRC count (CC): 4 bits</t><t>
191       The CSRC count contains the number of CSRC identifiers.
192 </t>
193
194 <t>Marker (M): 1 bit</t><t>
195       The M bit indicates if the packet contains comfort noise.  This 
196       field is used in conjunction with the cng SDP attribute and is 
197       detailed further in section 5 below.  In normal usage this bit 
198       is set if the packet contains comfort noise.
199 </t>
200
201 <t>Payload Type (PT): 7 bits</t><t>
202       An RTP profile for a class of applications is expected to assign 
203       a payload type for this format, or a dynamically allocated 
204       payload type SHOULD be chosen which designates the payload as 
205       Speex.
206 </t>
207
208 <t>Sequence number: 16 bits</t><t>
209       The sequence number increments by one for each RTP data packet
210       sent, and may be used by the receiver to detect packet loss and
211       to restore packet sequence.  This field is detailed further in
212       <xref target="rfc3550"></xref>.
213 </t>
214
215 <t>Timestamp: 32 bits</t><t>
216       A timestamp representing the sampling time of the first sample of
217       the first Speex packet in the RTP packet.  The clock frequency 
218       MUST be set to the sample rate of the encoded audio data.
219
220       Speex uses 20 msec frames and a variable sampling rate clock.  
221       The RTP timestamp MUST be in units of 1/X of a second where X 
222       is the sample rate used.  Speex uses a nominal 8kHz sampling rate
223       for narrowband use, a nominal 16kHz sampling rate for wideband use, 
224       and a nominal 32kHz sampling rate for ultra-wideband use.
225 </t>
226
227 <t>SSRC/CSRC identifiers:</t><t>
228       These two fields, 32 bits each with one SSRC field and a maximum 
229       of 16 CSRC fields, are as defined in <xref target="rfc3550"></xref>.  
230 </t>
231
232 </section>
233
234 <section anchor="Speex payload" title="Speex payload">
235
236 <t>
237 For the purposes of packetizing the bit stream in RTP, it is only
238 necessary to consider the sequence of bits as output by the Speex
239 encoder <xref target="speexenc"></xref>, and present the same sequence to the decoder.  The 
240 payload format described here maintains this sequence.  
241 </t>
242
243 <t>
244 A typical Speex frame, encoded at the maximum bitrate, is approx.
245 110 octets and the total number of Speex frames SHOULD be kept 
246 less than the path MTU to prevent fragmentation.  Speex frames MUST
247 NOT be fragmented across multiple RTP packets,
248 </t>
249
250 <t>
251 An RTP packet MAY contain Speex frames of the same bit rate or of
252 varying bit rates, since the bit-rate for a frame is conveyed in
253 band with the signal.
254 </t>
255
256 <t>
257 The encoding and decoding algorithm can change the bit rate at any
258 20 msec frame boundary, with the bit rate change notification provided
259 in-band with the bit stream.  Each frame contains both "mode" 
260 (narrowband, wideband or ultra-wideband) and "sub-mode" (bit-rate) 
261 information in the bit stream.  No out-of-band notification is 
262 required for the decoder to process changes in the bit rate sent 
263 by the encoder.
264 </t>
265
266 <t>
267 It is RECOMMENDED that values of 8000, 16000 and 32000 be used 
268 for normal internet telephony applications, though the sample 
269 rate is supported at rates as low as 6000 Hz and as high as 
270 48 kHz.
271 </t>
272
273 <t>
274 The RTP payload MUST be padded to provide an integer number of
275 octets as the payload length.  These padding bits are LSB aligned
276 in network octet order and consist of a 0 followed by all ones
277 (until the end of the octet).  This padding is only required for
278 the last frame in the packet, and only to ensure the packet
279 contents ends on an octet boundary.
280 </t>
281
282 </section>
283
284 <section anchor="Example Speex packet" title="Example Speex packet">
285
286 <t>
287 In the example below we have a single Speex frame with 5 bits
288 of padding to ensure the packet size falls on an octet boundary.
289 </t>
290
291 <artwork><![CDATA[
292     0                   1                   2                   3
293     0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
294    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
295    |V=2|P|X|  CC   |M|     PT      |       sequence number         |
296    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
297    |                           timestamp                           |
298    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
299    |         synchronization source (SSRC) identifier              |
300    +=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+
301
302     0                   1                   2                   3
303     0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
304    +=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+
305    |         contributing source (CSRC) identifiers                |
306    |                              ...                              |
307    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
308    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
309    |                        ..speex data..                         |
310    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
311    |                        ..speex data..               |0 1 1 1 1|
312    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
313 ]]></artwork>
314
315 </section>
316
317 <section anchor="Multiple Speex frames in a RTP packet" title="Multiple Speex frames in a RTP packet">
318
319 <t>
320 Below is an example of two Speex frames contained within one RTP 
321 packet.  The Speex frame length in this example fall on an octet
322 boundary so there is no padding.
323 </t>
324
325 <t>
326 Speex codecs <xref target="speexenc"></xref> are able to detect the the bitrate from the
327 payload and are responsible for detecting the 20 msec boundaries
328 between each frame.
329 </t>
330
331 <artwork><![CDATA[
332     0                   1                   2                   3
333     0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
334    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
335    |V=2|P|X|  CC   |M|     PT      |       sequence number         |
336    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
337    |                           timestamp                           |
338    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
339    |         synchronization source (SSRC) identifier              |
340    +=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+
341    |         contributing source (CSRC) identifiers                |
342    |                              ...                              |
343    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
344    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
345    |                        ..speex data..                         |
346    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
347    |        ..speex data..         |        ..speex data..         |
348    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
349    |                        ..speex data..                         |
350    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
351 ]]></artwork>
352
353 </section>
354
355 <section anchor="MIME registration of Speex" title="MIME registration of Speex">
356
357 <t>
358 Full definition of the MIME <xref target="rfc2045"></xref> type for Speex will be part of the Ogg
359 Vorbis MIME type definition application <xref target="rfc3534"></xref>.  
360 </t>
361
362 <t>MIME media type name: audio</t>
363
364 <t>MIME subtype: speex</t>
365
366 <t>Optional parameters:</t>
367
368 <t>Required parameters: to be included in the Ogg MIME specification.</t>
369
370 <t>Encoding considerations:</t>
371
372 <t>Security Considerations:</t>
373 <t>See Section 6 of RFC 3047.</t>
374
375 <t>Interoperability considerations: none</t>
376
377 <t>Published specification:  </t>
378
379 <t>Applications which use this media type:</t>
380
381 <t>Additional information: none</t>
382
383 <t>Person &amp; email address to contact for further information:<vspace blankLines="1" />
384 <list style="empty">
385 <t>Greg Herlein &lt;gherlein@herlein.com&gt;</t>
386 <t>Jean-Marc Valin &lt;jean-marc.valin@hermes.usherb.ca&gt;</t>
387 </list>
388 </t>
389
390 <t>Intended usage: COMMON</t>
391
392 <t>Author/Change controller:</t>
393
394 <t>
395 <list style="empty">
396 <t>Author:  Greg Herlein &lt;gherlein@herlein.com&gt;</t>
397 <t>Change controller: Greg Herlein &lt;gherlein@herlein.com&gt;</t>          
398 <t>Change controller: IETF AVT Working Group</t>
399 </list>
400 </t>
401
402 <t>
403 This transport type signifies that the content is to be interpreted
404 according to this document if the contents are transmitted over RTP. 
405 Should this transport type appear over a lossless streaming protocol
406 such as TCP, the content encapsulation should be interpreted as an 
407 Ogg Stream in accordance with <xref target="rfc3534"></xref>, with the exception that the
408 content of the Ogg Stream may be assumed to be Speex audio and 
409 Speex audio only.
410 </t>
411
412 </section>
413
414 <section anchor="SDP usage of Speex" title="SDP usage of Speex">
415
416 <t>
417 When conveying information by SDP <xref target="rfc2327"></xref>, the encoding name MUST be
418 set to "speex".  An example of the media representation in SDP for
419 offering a single channel of Speex at 8000 samples per second might
420 be:
421 </t>
422
423 <vspace blankLines="1" />
424 <list style="empty">
425 <t>m=audio 8088 RTP/AVP 97</t>
426 <t>a=rtpmap:97 speex/8000</t>
427 </list> 
428
429 <t>
430 Note that the RTP payload type code of 97 is defined in this media
431 definition to be 'mapped' to the speex codec at an 8kHz sampling
432 frequency using the 'a=rtpmap' line.  Any number from 96 to 127
433 could have been chosen (the allowed range for dynamic types).  
434 </t>
435
436 <t>
437 The value of the sampling frequency is typically 8000 for narrow band
438 operation, 16000 for wide band operation, and 32000 for ultra-wide
439 band operation.
440 </t>
441
442 <t>
443 If for some reason the offerer has bandwidth limitations, the client 
444 may use the "b=" header, as explained in SDP <xref target="rfc2327"></xref>. The following example
445 illustrates the case where the offerer cannot receive more than
446 10 kbit/s.
447 </t>
448
449 <vspace blankLines="1" />
450 <list style="empty">
451 <t>m=audio 8088 RTP/AVP 97</t>
452 <t>b=AS:10</t>
453 <t>a=rtmap:97 speex/8000</t>
454 </list> 
455
456 <t>
457 In this case, if the remote part agrees, it should configure its
458 Speex encoder so that it does not use modes that produce more than
459 10 kbit/s. Note that the "b=" constraint also applies on all
460 payload types that may be proposed in the media line ("m=").
461 </t>
462
463 <t>
464 An other way to make recommendations to the remote Speex encoder
465 is to use its specific parameters via the a=fmtp: directive.  The
466 following parameters are defined for use in this way:
467 </t>
468
469 <vspace blankLines="1" />
470 <list style="empty">
471 <t>ptime: duration of each packet in milliseconds.<vspace blankLines="1" /></t>
472
473 <t>sr:    actual sample rate in Hz.<vspace blankLines="1" /></t>
474
475 <t>ebw:   encoding bandwidth - either 'narrow' or 'wide' or 
476         'ultra' (corresponds to nominal 8000, 16000, and
477                 32000 Hz sampling rates).<vspace blankLines="1" /></t>
478
479 <t>vbr:   variable bit rate  - either 'on' 'off' or 'vad'
480                 (defaults to off).  If on, variable bit rate is
481                 enabled.  If off, disabled.  If set to 'vad' then
482                 constant bit rate is used but silence will be encoded
483                 with special short frames to indicate a lack of voice
484                 for that period.<vspace blankLines="1" /></t>
485
486 <t>cng:   comfort noise generation - either 'on' or 'off'. If
487                 off then silence frames will be silent; if 'on' then
488                 those frames will be filled with comfort noise.<vspace blankLines="1" /></t>
489
490 <t>mode:  Speex encoding mode. Can be {1,2,3,4,5,6,any}
491                 defaults to 3 in narrowband, 6 in wide and ultra-wide.<vspace blankLines="1" /></t>
492
493 <t>penh:        use of perceptual enhancement. 1 indicates 
494                 to the decoder that perceptual enhancement is recommended,
495                 0 indicates that it is not. Defaults to on (1).<vspace blankLines="1" /></t>
496 </list> 
497
498 <t>Examples:</t>
499
500 <vspace blankLines="1" />
501 <list style="empty">
502         <t>m=audio 8008 RTP/AVP 97</t>
503         <t>a=rtpmap:97 speex/8000</t>
504         <t>a=fmtp:97 mode=4</t>
505 </list> 
506
507 <t>
508 This examples illustrate an offerer that wishes to receive
509 a Speex stream at 8000Hz, but only using speex mode 3.
510 </t>
511  
512 <t>
513 The offerer may suggest to the remote decoder to activate
514 its perceptual enhancement filter like this:
515 </t>
516
517 <vspace blankLines="1" />   
518 <list style="empty">
519         <t>m=audio 8088 RTP/AVP 97</t>
520         <t>a=rtmap:97 speex/8000</t>
521         <t>a=fmtp:97 penh=1 </t>
522 </list> 
523         
524 <t>
525 Several Speex specific parameters can be given in a single
526 a=fmtp line provided that they are separated by a semi-colon:
527 </t>
528
529 <vspace blankLines="1" />   
530 <list style="empty">
531         <t>a=fmtp:97 mode=any;penh=1</t>
532 </list> 
533
534 <t>
535 The offerer may indicate that it wishes to send variable bit rate
536 frames with comfort noise:
537 </t>
538
539 <vspace blankLines="1" />
540 <list style="empty">
541         <t>m=audio 8088 RTP/AVP 97</t>
542         <t>a=rtmap:97 speex/8000</t>
543         <t>a=fmtp:97 vbr=on;cng=on</t>
544 </list> 
545
546 <t>
547 The "ptime" attribute is used to denote the packetization 
548 interval (ie, how many milliseconds of audio is encoded in a 
549 single RTP packet).  Since Speex uses 20 msec frames, ptime values 
550 of multiples of 20 denote multiple Speex frames per packet.  
551 Values of ptime which are not multiples of 20 MUST be ignored 
552 and clients MUST use the default value of 20 instead.
553 </t>
554    
555 <t>
556 In the example below the ptime value is set to 40, indicating that 
557 there are 2 frames in each packet.      
558 </t>
559
560 <vspace blankLines="1" />   
561 <list style="empty">
562         <t>m=audio 8008 RTP/AVP 97</t>
563         <t>a=rtpmap:97 speex/8000</t>
564         <t>a=ptime:40</t>
565 </list> 
566
567 <t>
568 Note that the ptime parameter applies to all payloads listed
569 in the media line and is not used as part of an a=fmtp directive.
570 </t>
571
572 <t>
573 Values of ptime not multiple of 20 msec are meaningless, so the 
574 receiver of such ptime values MUST ignore them.  If during the 
575 life of an RTP session the ptime value changes, when there are 
576 multiple Speex frames for example, the SDP value must also reflect 
577 the new value. 
578 </t>
579
580 <t>
581 Care must be taken when setting the value of ptime so that the 
582 RTP packet size does not exceed the path MTU. 
583 </t>
584
585 </section>
586 <section anchor="ITU H.323/H.245 Use of Speex" title="ITU H.323/H.245 Use of Speex">
587
588 <t>
589 Application is underway to make Speex a standard ITU codec.
590 However, until that is finalized, Speex MAY be used in H.323 <xref target="H323"></xref> by
591 using a non-standard codec block definition in the H.245 <xref target="H245"></xref> codec
592 capability negotiations.  
593 </t>
594
595 </section>
596
597 <section anchor="NonStandardMessage format" title="NonStandardMessage format">
598
599 <t>
600 For Speex use in H.245 <xref target="H245"></xref> based systems, the fields in the
601 NonStandardMessage should be:
602 </t>
603
604 <vspace blankLines="1" />   
605 <list style="empty">
606 <t>t35CountryCode   = Hex: B5</t>
607 <t>t35Extension     = Hex: 00</t>
608 <t>manufacturerCode = Hex: 0026</t>
609 <t>[Length of the Binary Sequence (8 bit number)]</t>
610 <t>[Binary Sequence consisting of an ASCII string, no NULL terminator]</t>
611 </list>
612
613 <t>
614 The binary sequence is an ascii string merely for ease of use.
615 The string is not null terminated.  The format of this string is
616 </t>
617
618 <vspace blankLines="1" />   
619 <list style="empty">
620 <t>speex [optional variables]</t>
621 </list>
622    
623 <t>
624 The optional variables are identical to those used for the SDP
625 a=fmtp strings discussed in section 5 above.  The string is built
626 to be all on one line, each key-value pair separated by a
627 semi-colon.  The optional variables MAY be omitted, which causes
628 the default values to be assumed.  They are:
629 </t>
630
631 <vspace blankLines="1" />   
632 <list style="empty">
633 <t>ebw=narrow;mode=3;vbr=off;cng=off;ptime=20;sr=8000;penh=no;</t>
634 </list>
635
636 <t>
637 The fifth octet of the block is the length of the binary sequence.
638 </t>
639
640 <t>
641 NOTE:  this method can result in the advertising of a large number
642 of Speex 'codecs' based on the number of variables possible.  For
643 most VoIP applications, use of the default binary sequence of
644 'speex' is RECOMMENDED to be used in addition to all other options.
645 This maximizes the chances that two H.323 based applications that
646 support Speex can find a mutual codec.   
647 </t>
648
649 </section>
650
651 <section anchor="RTP Payload Types" title="RTP Payload Types">
652
653 <t>
654 Dynamic payload type codes MUST be negotiated 'out-of-band'
655 for the assignment of a dynamic payload type from the
656 range of 96-127.  H.323 applications MUST use the H.245
657 H2250LogicalChannelParameters encoding to accomplish this.  
658 </t>
659
660 </section>
661
662 <section anchor="Security Considerations" title="Security Considerations">
663
664 <t>
665 RTP packets using the payload format defined in this specification
666 are subject to the security considerations discussed in the RTP
667 specification <xref target="rfc3550"></xref>, and any appropriate RTP profile.  This implies
668 that confidentiality of the media streams is achieved by encryption.
669 Because the data compression used with this payload format is applied
670 end-to-end, encryption may be performed after compression so there is
671 no conflict between the two operations.
672 </t>
673
674 <t>
675 A potential denial-of-service threat exists for data encodings using
676 compression techniques that have non-uniform receiver-end
677 computational load.  The attacker can inject pathological datagrams
678 into the stream which are complex to decode and cause the receiver to
679 be overloaded.  However, this encoding does not exhibit any
680 significant non-uniformity.
681 </t>
682
683 <t>
684 As with any IP-based protocol, in some circumstances a receiver may
685 be overloaded simply by the receipt of too many packets, either
686 desired or undesired.  Network-layer authentication may be used to
687 discard packets from undesired sources, but the processing cost of
688 the authentication itself may be too high.  
689 </t>
690
691 </section> 
692
693 <section anchor="Acknowledgments" title="Acknowledgments">
694
695 <t>
696 The authors would like to thank Equivalence Pty Ltd of Australia
697 for their assistance in attempting to standardize the use of Speex
698 in H.323 applications, and for implementing Speex in their open
699 source OpenH323 stack.  The authors would also like to thank Brian
700 C. Wiles &lt;brian@streamcomm.com&gt; of StreamComm for his assistance in
701 developing the proposed standard for Speex use in H.323
702 applications.
703 </t>
704
705 <t>
706 The authors would also like to thank the following members of the 
707 Speex and AVT communities for their input:  Ross Finlayson, 
708 Federico Montesino Pouzols, Henning Schulzrinne, Magnus Westerlund.
709 </t>
710 </section> 
711
712 </middle>
713
714 <back>
715
716 <references title="Normative References">
717
718 <reference anchor="rfc2119">
719 <front>
720 <title>Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate Requirement Levels </title>
721 <author initials="S." surname="Bradner" fullname="Scott Bradner"></author>
722 </front>
723 <seriesInfo name="RFC" value="2119" />
724 </reference> 
725
726 <reference anchor="rfc3550">
727 <front>
728 <title>RTP: A Transport Protocol for real-time applications</title>
729 <author initials="H." surname="Schulzrinne" fullname=""></author>
730 <author initials="S." surname="Casner" fullname=""></author>
731 <author initials="R." surname="Frederick" fullname=""></author>
732 <author initials="V." surname="Jacobson" fullname=""></author>
733 </front>
734 <seriesInfo name="RFC" value="3550" />
735 </reference> 
736
737 <reference anchor="rfc2045">
738 <front>
739 <title>Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) Part One: Format of Internet Message Bodies</title>
740 <author initials="" surname="" fullname=""></author>
741 </front>
742 <date month="November" year="1998" />
743 <seriesInfo name="RFC" value="2045" />
744 </reference> 
745
746 <reference anchor="rfc2327">
747 <front>
748 <title>SDP: Session Description Protocol</title>
749 <author initials="V." surname="Jacobson" fullname=""></author>
750 <author initials="M." surname="Handley" fullname=""></author>
751 </front>
752 <date month="April" year="1998" />
753 <seriesInfo name="RFC" value="2327" />
754 </reference> 
755
756 <reference anchor="H323">
757 <front>
758 <title>Packet-based Multimedia Communications Systems</title>
759 <author initials="" surname="" fullname=""></author>
760 </front>
761 <date month="" year="1998" />
762 <seriesInfo name="ITU-T Recommendation" value="H.323" />
763 </reference> 
764
765 <reference anchor="H245">
766 <front>
767 <title>Control of communications between Visual Telephone Systems and Terminal Equipment</title>
768 <author initials="" surname="" fullname=""></author>
769 </front>
770 <date month="" year="1998" />
771 <seriesInfo name="ITU-T Recommendation" value="H.245" />
772 </reference> 
773
774 <reference anchor="rfc3551">
775 <front>
776 <title>RTP Profile for Audio and Video Conferences with Minimal Control.</title>
777 <author initials="H." surname="Schulzrinne" fullname=""></author>
778 <author initials="S." surname="Casner" fullname=""></author>
779 </front>
780 <date month="July" year="2003" />
781 <seriesInfo name="RFC" value="3551" />
782 </reference> 
783
784 <reference anchor="rfc3534">
785 <front>
786 <title>The application/ogg Media Type</title>
787 <author initials="L." surname="Walleij" fullname=""></author>
788 </front>
789 <date month="May" year="2003" />
790 <seriesInfo name="RFC" value="3534" />
791 </reference> 
792
793 </references> 
794
795 <references title="Informative References">
796
797 <reference anchor="speexenc">
798 <front>
799 <title>Speexenc/speexdec, reference command-line encoder/decoder</title>
800 </front>
801 <seriesInfo name="Speex website" value="http://www.speex.org/" />
802 </reference> 
803
804 <reference anchor="CELP">
805 <front>
806 <title>CELP, U.S. Federal Standard 1016.</title>
807 <author initials="" surname="" fullname=""></author>
808 </front>
809 <seriesInfo name="National Technical Information Service (NTIS) website" value="http://www.ntis.gov/" />
810 </reference> 
811
812 </references> 
813
814 </back>
815 </rfc>