59a5425d6922ffa292d7213006c8137e73c96d04
[opus.git] / doc / ietf / draft-valin-celt-codec.xml
1 <?xml version='1.0'?>
2 <!DOCTYPE rfc SYSTEM 'rfc2629.dtd'>
3 <?rfc toc="yes" symrefs="yes" ?>
4
5 <rfc ipr="trust200902" category="std" docName="draft-valin-celt-codec-00">
6
7 <front>
8 <title abbrev="CELT codec">Constrained-Energy Lapped Transform (CELT) Codec</title>
9
10
11
12 <author initials="J-M" surname="Valin" fullname="Jean-Marc Valin">
13 <organization>Octasic Semiconductor</organization>
14 <address>
15 <postal>
16 <street>4101, Molson Street, suite 300</street>
17 <city>Montreal</city>
18 <region>Quebec</region>
19 <code>H1Y 3L1</code>
20 <country>Canada</country>
21 </postal>
22 <email>jean-marc.valin@octasic.com</email>
23 </address>
24 </author>
25
26 <author initials="T" surname="Terriberry" fullname="Timothy B. Terriberry">
27 <organization>Xiph.Org Foundation</organization>
28 <address>
29 <postal>
30 <street></street>
31 <city></city>
32 <region></region>
33 <code></code>
34 <country></country>
35 </postal>
36 <email>tterribe@xiph.org</email>
37 </address>
38 </author>
39
40 <author initials="G" surname="Maxwell" fullname="Gregory Maxwell">
41 <organization>Juniper Networks</organization>
42 <address>
43 <postal>
44 <street>2251 Corporate Park Drive, Suite 100</street>
45 <city>Herndon</city>
46 <region>VA</region>
47 <code>20171-1817</code>
48 <country>USA</country>
49 </postal>
50 <email>gmaxwell@juniper.net</email>
51 </address>
52 </author>
53
54 <!-- <author initials="et" surname="al." fullname="et al.">
55 <organization></organization>
56 </author>
57 -->
58
59 <date day="3" month="July" year="2009" />
60
61 <area>General</area>
62
63 <workgroup>AVT Working Group</workgroup>
64 <keyword>audio codec</keyword>
65 <keyword>low delay</keyword>
66 <keyword>Internet-Draft</keyword>
67 <keyword>CELT</keyword>
68
69 <abstract>
70 <t>
71 CELT <xref target="celt-website"/> is an open-source voice codec suitable for use in very low delay 
72 Voice over IP (VoIP) type applications.  This document describes the encoding
73 and decoding process. 
74 </t>
75 </abstract>
76 </front>
77
78 <middle>
79
80 <section anchor="Introduction" title="Introduction">
81 <t>
82 This document describes the CELT codec, which is designed for transmitting full-bandwidth
83 audio with very low delay. It is suitable for encoding both
84 speech and music at rates starting at 32 kbit/s. It is primarily designed for transmission
85 over packet networks and protocols such as RTP <xref target="rfc3550"/>, but also includes
86 a certain amount of robustness to bit errors, where this could be done at no significant
87 cost. 
88 </t>
89
90 <t>The novel aspect of CELT compared to most other codecs is its very low delay,
91 below 10 ms. There are two main advantages to having a very low delay audio link.
92 The lower delay itself is important for some interactions, such as playing music
93 remotely. Another advantage is its behavior in the presence of acoustic echo. When
94 the round-trip audio delay is sufficiently low, acoustic echo is no longer
95 perceived as a distinct repetition, but rather as extra reverberation. Applications
96 of CELT include:</t>
97 <t>
98 <list style="symbols">
99 <t>Collaborative network music performance</t>
100 <t>High-quality teleconferencing</t>
101 <t>Wireless audio equipment</t>
102 <t>Low-delay links for broadcast applications</t>
103 </list>
104 </t>
105
106 <t>
107 The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
108 "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
109 document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 <xref target="rfc2119"/>.
110 </t>
111
112 </section>
113
114 <section anchor="overview" title="Overview of the CELT Codec">
115
116 <t>
117 CELT stands for <spanx style="emph">Constrained Energy Lapped Transform</spanx>. This is
118 the fundamental principle of the codec: the quantization process is designed in such a way
119 as to preserve the energy in a certain number of bands. The theoretical aspects of the
120 codec are described in greater detail <xref target="celt-tasl"/> and 
121 <xref target="celt-eusipco"/>. Although these papers describe slightly older versions of
122 the codec (version 0.3.2 and 0.5.1, respectively), the principles remain the same.
123 </t>
124
125 <t>CELT is a transform codec, based on the Modified Discrete Cosine Transform 
126 <xref target="mdct"/>, derived from the DCT-IV, with overlap and time-domain
127 aliasing cancellation. The main characteristics of CELT are as follows:
128
129 <list style="symbols">
130 <t>Ultra-low algorithmic delay (scalable, typically 3 to 9 ms)</t>
131 <t>Sampling rates from 32 kHz to 48 kHz and above (full audio bandwidth)</t>
132 <t>Applicable to both speech and music</t>
133 <t>Support for mono and stereo</t>
134 <t>Adaptive bit-rate from 32 kbit/s to 128 kbit/s and above</t>
135 <t>Scalable complexity</t>
136 <t>Robustness to packet loss (scalable trade-off between quality and loss-robustness)</t>
137 <t>Open source implementation (floating-point and fixed-point)</t>
138 <t>No known intellectual property issues</t>
139 </list>
140 </t>
141
142 <section anchor="bitstream" title="Bit-stream definition">
143
144 <t>
145 This document contains a detailed description of both the encoder and the decoder, along with a reference implementation. In most circumstances, and unless otherwise stated, the calculations in other implementations do NOT need to produce results that are bit-identical with the reference implementation, so alternate algorithms can sometimes be used. However, there are a few (clearly identified) cases where bit-exactness is required. An implementation is considered to be compatible if, for any valid bit-stream, the decoder's output is perceptually very close to the output produced by the reference decoder.
146 </t>
147
148 <t>
149 The CELT codec does not use a standard <spanx style="emph">bit-packer</spanx>, 
150 but rather uses a range coder to pack both integers and entropy-coded symbols. 
151 In mono mode, the bit-stream generated by the encoder contains the 
152 following parameters (in order):
153 </t>
154
155 <t>
156 <list style="symbols">
157 <t>Feature flags I, P, S, F (2-4 bits)</t>
158 <t>if P=1
159    <list style="symbols">
160       <t>Pitch period</t>
161    </list></t>
162 <t>if S=1
163    <list style="symbols">
164       <t>Transient scalefactor</t>
165       <t>if scalefactor=(1 or 2) AND more than 2 short MDCTs
166              <list style="symbols">
167                     <t>ID of block before transient</t>
168                  </list></t>
169       <t>if scalefactor=3
170              <list style="symbols">
171                     <t>Transient time</t>
172       </list></t>
173    </list></t>
174 <t>Coarse energy encoding (for each band)</t>
175 <t>Fine energy encoding (for each band)</t>
176 <t>For each band
177    <list style="symbols">
178       <t>if P=1 and band is at the beginning of a pitch band
179           <list>
180              <t>Pitch gain bit</t>
181           </list></t>
182           <t>PVQ indices</t>
183    </list></t>
184 <t>More fine energy (using all remaining bits)</t>
185 </list>
186 </t>
187
188 <t>Note that due to the use of a range coder, all of the parameters have to be encoded and decoded in order. </t>
189
190 <t>
191 The CELT bit-stream is "octet-based" in the sense that the encoder always produces an 
192 integer number of octets when encoding a frame. Also, the bit-rate used by CELT can 
193 <spanx style="strong">only</spanx> be determined by the number of octets produced by
194 the encoder. In many cases, the transport layer already encodes the data length, so
195 no extra information is used to signal the bit-rate. In cases where this is not true,
196 or when there are multiple compressed frames per packet, the size of each compressed
197 frame MUST be signalled in some way.
198 </t>
199
200
201 </section>
202
203 </section>
204
205 <section anchor="CELT Modes" title="CELT Modes">
206 <t>
207 The operation of both the encoder and decoder depends on the mode data. A mode
208 definition can be created by celt_create_mode() (<xref target="modes.c">modes.c</xref>)
209 based on three parameters:
210 <list style="symbols">
211 <t>frame size (number of samples)</t>
212 <t>sampling rate (samples per second)</t>
213 <t>number of channels (1 or 2)</t>
214 </list>
215 </t>
216
217 <t>The mode data that is created defines how the encoder and the decoder operate. More specifically, the following information is contained in the mode object:
218
219 <list style="symbols">
220 <t>Frame size</t>
221 <t>Sampling rate</t>
222 <t>Windowing overlap</t>
223 <t>Number of channels</t>
224 <t>Definition of the bands</t>
225 <t>Definition of the <spanx style="emph">pitch bands</spanx></t>
226 <t>Decay coefficients of the Laplace distributions for coarse energy</t>
227 <t>Bit allocation matrix</t>
228 </list>
229 </t>
230
231 <t>
232 The windowing overlap is the amount of overlap between the frames. CELT uses a low-overlap window that is typically half of the frame size. For a frame size of 256 samples, the overlap is 128 samples, so the total algorithmic delay is 256+128=384. CELT divides the audio into frequency bands, for which the energy is preserved. These bands are chosen to follow the ear's critical bands, with the exception that each band has to contain at least 3 frequency bins. 
233 </t>
234
235 <t>
236 The energy bands are based on the Bark scale. The Bark band edges (in Hz) are defined as 
237 [0, 100, 200, 300, 400, 510, 630, 770, 920, 1080, 1270,  1480,  1720,  2000,  2320,
238 2700, 3150, 3700, 4400, 5300, 6400,  7700, 9500, 12000, 15500, 20000]. The actual bands used by the codec
239 depend on the sampling rate and the frame size being used. The mapping from Hz to MDCT bins is done by
240 multiplying by sampling_rate/(2*frame_size) and rounding to the nearest value. An exception is made for
241 the lower frequencies to ensure that all bands contain at least 3 MDCT bins. The definition of the Bark
242 bands is computed in compute_ebands() (<xref target="modes.c">modes.c</xref>).
243 </t>
244
245 <t>
246 CELT includes a pitch predictor for which the gains are defined over 
247 a set of <spanx style="emph">pitch bands</spanx>. The pitch bands are defined
248 (in Hz) as [0, 345, 689, 1034, 1378, 2067, 3273, 5340, 6374]. The Hz values
249 are mapped to MDCT bins in the same was as the energy bands. The pitch
250 band boundaries are aligned to energy band boundaries. The definition of the pitch
251 bands is computed in compute_pbands() (<xref target="modes.c">modes.c</xref>).
252 </t>
253 </section>
254
255 <section anchor="CELT Encoder" title="CELT Encoder">
256
257 <t>
258 The top-level function for encoding a CELT frame in the reference implementation is
259 celt_encode() (<xref target="celt.c">celt.c</xref>).
260 The basic block diagram of the CELT encoder is illustrated in <xref target="encoder-diagram"></xref>.
261 The encoder contains most of the building blocks of the decoder and can,
262 with very little extra computation, compute the signal that would be decoded by the decoder.
263 CELT has three main quantizers denoted Q1, Q2 and Q3. These apply to band energies, pitch gains
264 and normalized MDCT bins, respectively.
265 </t>
266
267 <figure anchor="encoder-diagram">
268 <artwork>
269 <![CDATA[
270                   +-----------+        +--+
271                +--|  Energy   |-+----->|Q1|-------------+
272                |  |computation| |      +--+             |
273                |  +-----------+ |                       |
274                |          +-----+                       |
275                |          v                             v
276    +------+  +-+--+     +---+   +---+  +--+  +-----+  +---+  +-----+
277 -->|Window|->|MDCT|---->| / |-+>| - |->|Q3|->| Mix |->| * |->|IMDCT|-+
278    +---+--+  +----+     +---+ | +---+  +--+  +-----+  +---+  +-----+ |
279        |                      |   ^      ^      ^                    |
280        |                      |   +------+------+                    |
281        +-+                    v                 |                    |
282          |              +-----------+  +--+   +-+-+                  |
283          |              |pitch gains|->|Q2|-->| * |                  |
284          |              +-----------+  +--+   +---+                  |
285          |                    ^                 ^                    |
286          |                    +-----------------+                    |
287          v                                      |                    |
288    +------------+                        +------+-----+              |
289    |Pitch period|                        |Delay, MDCT,|              |
290    |estimation  |----------------------->|  Normalize |              |
291    +------------+                        +------------+              |
292          ^                                      ^                    |
293          +--------------------------------------+--------------------+
294 ]]>
295 </artwork>
296 <postamble>Block diagram of the CELT encoder</postamble>
297 </figure>
298
299 <!--
300 <texttable anchor="bitstream">
301         <ttcol align='center'>Parameter(s)</ttcol>
302         <ttcol align='center'>Condition</ttcol>
303         <ttcol align='center'>Symbol(s)</ttcol>
304         <c>Feature flags</c><c>Always</c><c>2-4 bits</c>
305         <c>Pitch period</c><c>P=1</c><c>1 Integer (8-9 bits)</c>
306         <c>Transient scalefactor</c><c>S=1</c><c>2 bits</c>
307         <c>Coarse energy</c><c>Always</c><c>one symbol per band</c>
308         <c>Fine energy</c><c>Always</c><c>one symbol per band</c>
309         <c>PVQ indices</c><c>Always</c><c>one symbol per band</c>
310         <c>Remaining fine energy</c><c>bits available</c><c>one bit per band</c>
311 </texttable>
312 -->
313
314
315
316 <!--
317 <figure>
318 <artwork>
319 +-----------------+---------------------+------------------------------+
320 |  Feature flags  | (pitch period if P) | (transient scalefactor if S) |
321 +-----------------+---------------------+------------------------------+
322 |  (transient time if scalefactor == 3) |  coarse energy               |
323 +----------------+----------------------+-------+----------------------+
324 |  fine energy   |  PVQ indices  for all bands  |  (more fine energy)  |
325 +----------------+------------------------------+----------------------+
326 </artwork>
327 <postamble>Fields within parentheses are not included in every packet</postamble>
328 </figure>
329 -->
330
331 <section anchor="pre-emphasis" title="Pre-emphasis">
332
333 <t>The input audio first goes through a pre-emphasis filter, which attenuates the
334 <spanx style="emph">spectral tilt</spanx>. The filter is has the transfer function A(z)=1-alpha_p*z^-1, with
335 alpha_p=0.8. Although it is not a requirement, no part of the reference encoder operates
336 on the non-pre-emphasized signal. The inverse of the pre-emphasis is applied at the decoder.</t>
337
338 </section> <!-- pre-emphasis -->
339
340 <section anchor="range-encoder" title="Range Coder">
341 <t>
342 CELT uses an entropy coder based upon <xref target="range-coding"></xref>, 
343 which is itself a rediscovery of the FIFO arithmetic code introduced by <xref target="coding-thesis"></xref>.
344 It is very similar to arithmetic encoding, except that encoding is done with
345 digits in any base instead of with bits, 
346 so it is faster when using larger bases (i.e.: an octet). All of the
347 calculations in the range coder must use bit-exact integer arithmetic.
348 </t>
349
350 <t>
351 The range coder also acts as the bit-packer for CELT. It is
352 used in three different ways, to encode:
353 <list style="symbols">
354 <t>entropy-coded symbols with a fixed probability model using ec_encode(), (<xref target="rangeenc.c">rangeenc.c</xref>)</t>
355 <t>integers from 0 to 2^M-1 using ec_enc_uint() or ec_enc_bits(), (<xref target="entenc.c">entenc.c</xref>)</t>
356 <t>integers from 0 to N-1 (where N is not a power of two) using ec_enc_uint(). (<xref target="entenc.c">entenc.c</xref>)</t>
357 </list>
358 </t>
359
360 <t>
361 The range encoder maintains an internal state vector composed of the
362 four-tuple (low,rng,rem,ext), representing the low end of the current
363 range, the size of the current range, a single buffered output octet,
364 and a count of additional carry-propagating output octets. Both rng
365 and low are 32-bit unsigned integer values, rem is an octet value or
366 the special value -1, and ext is an integer with at least 16 bits.
367 This state vector is initialized at the start of each each frame to
368 the value (0,2^31,-1,0).
369 </t>
370
371 <t>
372 Each symbol is drawn from a finite alphabet and coded in a separate
373 context which describes the size of the alphabet and the relative
374 frequency of each symbol in that alphabet. CELT only uses static
375 contexts; they are not adapted to the statistics of the data that is
376 coded.
377 </t>
378
379 <section anchor="encoding-symbols" title="Encoding Symbols">
380 <t>
381    The main encoding function is ec_encode() (<xref target="rangeenc.c">rangeenc.c</xref>),
382    which takes as an argument a three-tuple (fl,fh,ft)
383    describing the range of the symbol to be encoded in the current
384    context, with 0 &lt;= fl &lt; fh &lt;= ft &lt;= 65535. The values of this tuple
385    are derived from the probability model for the symbol. Let f(i) be
386    the frequency of the ith symbol in the current context. Then the
387    three-tuple corresponding to the kth symbol is given by
388    <![CDATA[
389 fl=sum(f(i),i<k), fh=fl+f(i), and ft=sum(f(i)).
390 ]]>
391 </t>
392 <t>
393    ec_encode() updates the state of the encoder as follows. If fl is
394    greater than zero, then low = low + rng - (rng/ft)*(ft-fl) and 
395    rng = (rng/ft)*(fh-fl). Otherwise, low is unchanged and
396    rng = rng - (rng/ft)*(fh-fl). The divisions here are exact integer
397    division. After this update, the range is normalized.
398 </t>
399 <t>
400    To normalize the range, the following process is repeated until
401    rng > 2^23. First, the top 9 bits of low, (low>>23), are placed into
402    a carry buffer. Then, low is set to <![CDATA[(low << 8 & 0x7FFFFFFF) and rng
403    is set to (rng<<8)]]>. This process is carried out by
404    ec_enc_normalize() (<xref target="rangeenc.c">rangeenc.c</xref>).
405 </t>
406 <t>
407    The 9 bits produced in each iteration of the normalization loop
408    consist of 8 data bits and a carry flag. The final value of the
409    output bits is not determined until carry propagation is accounted
410    for. Therefore the reference implementation buffers a single
411    (non-propagating) output octet and keeps a count of additional
412    propagating (0xFF) output octets. An implementation MAY choose to use
413    any mathematically equivalent scheme to perform carry propagation.
414 </t>
415 <t>
416    The function ec_enc_carry_out() (<xref target="rangeenc.c">rangeenc.c</xref>) performs
417    this buffering. It takes a 9-bit input value, c, from the normalization
418    8-bit output and a carry bit. If c is 0xFF, then ext is incremented
419    and no octets are output. Otherwise, if rem is not the special value
420    -1, then the octet (rem+(c>>8)) is output. Then ext octets are output
421    with the value 0 if the carry bit is set, or 0xFF if it is not, and
422    rem is set to the lower 8 bits of c. After this, ext is set to zero.
423 </t>
424 <t>
425    In the reference implementation, a special version of ec_encode()
426    called ec_encode_bin() (<xref target="rangeenc.c">rangeenc.c</xref>) is defined to
427    take a two-tuple (fl,ftb), where <![CDATA[0 <= fl < 2^ftb and ftb < 16. It is
428    mathematically equivalent to calling ec_encode() with the three-tuple
429    (fl,fl+1,1<<ftb)]]>, but avoids using division.
430
431 </t>
432 </section>
433
434 <section anchor="encoding-ints" title="Encoding Uniformly Distributed Integers">
435 <t>
436    Functions ec_enc_uint() or ec_enc_bits() are based on ec_encode() and 
437    encode one of N equiprobable symbols, each with a frequency of 1,
438    where N may be as large as 2^32-1. Because ec_encode() is limited to
439    a total frequency of 2^16-1, this is done by encoding a series of
440    symbols in smaller contexts.
441 </t>
442 <t>
443    ec_enc_bits() (<xref target="entenc.c">entenc.c</xref>) is defined, like
444    ec_encode_bin(), to take a two-tuple (fl,ftb), with <![CDATA[0 <= fl < 2^ftb
445    and ftb < 32. While ftb is greater than 8, it encodes bits (ftb-8) to
446    (ftb-1) of fl, e.g., (fl>>ftb-8&0xFF) using ec_encode_bin() and
447    subtracts 8 from ftb. Then, it encodes the remaining bits of fl, e.g.,
448    (fl&(1<<ftb)-1)]]>, again using ec_encode_bin().
449 </t>
450 <t>
451    ec_enc_uint() (<xref target="entenc.c">entenc.c</xref>) takes a two-tuple (fl,ft),
452    where ft is not necessarily a power of two. Let ftb be the location
453    of the highest 1 bit in the two's-complement representation of
454    (ft-1), or -1 if no bits are set. If ftb>8, then the top 8 bits of fl
455    are encoded using ec_encode() with the three-tuple
456    (fl>>ftb-8,(fl>>ftb-8)+1,(ft-1>>ftb-8)+1), and the remaining bits
457    are encoded with ec_enc_bits using the two-tuple
458    <![CDATA[(fl&(1<<ftb-8)-1,ftb-8). Otherwise, fl is encoded with ec_encode()
459    directly using the three-tuple (fl,fl+1,ft)]]>.
460 </t>
461 </section>
462
463 <section anchor="encoder-finalizing" title="Finalizing the Stream">
464 <t>
465    After all symbols are encoded, the stream must be finalized by
466    outputting a value inside the current range. Let end be the integer
467    in the interval [low,low+rng) with the largest number of trailing
468    zero bits. Then while end is not zero, the top 9 bits of end, e.g.,
469    <![CDATA[(end>>23), are sent to the carry buffer, and end is replaced by
470    (end<<8&0x7FFFFFFF). Finally, if the value in carry buffer, rem, is]]>
471    neither zero nor the special value -1, or the carry count, ext, is
472    greater than zero, then 9 zero bits are sent to the carry buffer.
473    After the carry buffer is finished outputting octets, the rest of the
474    output buffer is padded with zero octets. Finally, rem is set to the
475    special value -1. This process is implemented by ec_enc_done()
476    (<xref target="rangeenc.c">rangeenc.c</xref>).
477 </t>
478 </section>
479
480 <section anchor="encoder-tell" title="Current Bit Usage">
481 <t>
482    The bit allocation routines in CELT need to be able to determine a
483    conservative upper bound on the number of bits that have been used
484    to encode the current frame thus far. This drives allocation
485    decisions and ensures that the range code will not overflow the
486    output buffer. This is computed in the reference implementation to
487    fractional bit precision by the function ec_enc_tell() 
488    (<xref target="rangeenc.c">rangeenc.c</xref>).
489    Like all operations in the range encoder, it must
490    be implemented in a bit-exact manner.
491 </t>
492 </section>
493
494 </section>
495
496 <section anchor="Encoder Feature Selection" title="Encoder Feature Selection">
497
498 <t>
499 The CELT codec has several optional features that can be switched on or off in each frame, some of which are mutually exclusive. The four main flags are intra-frame energy (I), pitch (P), short blocks (S), and folding (F). Those are described in more detail below. There are eight valid combinations of these four features, and they are encoded into the stream first using a variable length code (<xref target="flags-encoding"></xref>). It is left to the implementor to choose when to enable each of the flags, with the only restriction that the combination of the four flags MUST correspond to a valid entry in <xref target="flags-encoding"></xref>.
500 </t>
501
502 <texttable anchor="flags-encoding">
503         <preamble>Encoding of the feature flags</preamble>
504         <ttcol align='center'>I</ttcol>
505         <ttcol align='center'>P</ttcol>
506         <ttcol align='center'>S</ttcol>
507         <ttcol align='center'>F</ttcol>
508         <ttcol align='right'>Encoding</ttcol>
509         <c>0</c><c>0</c><c>0</c><c>1</c><c>00</c>
510         <c>0</c><c>1</c><c>0</c><c>1</c><c>01</c>
511         <c>1</c><c>0</c><c>0</c><c>1</c><c>110</c>
512         <c>1</c><c>0</c><c>1</c><c>1</c><c>111</c>
513                 
514         <c>0</c><c>0</c><c>0</c><c>0</c><c>1000</c>
515         <c>0</c><c>0</c><c>1</c><c>1</c><c>1001</c>
516         <c>0</c><c>1</c><c>0</c><c>0</c><c>1010</c>
517         <c>1</c><c>0</c><c>0</c><c>0</c><c>1011</c>
518 </texttable>
519
520 <section anchor="intra" title="Intra-frame energy (I)">
521 <t>
522 CELT uses prediction to encode the energy in each frequency band. In order to make frames independent, however, it is possible to disable the part of the prediction that depends on previous frames. This is called <spanx style="emph">intra-frame energy</spanx> and requires around 12 more bits per frame. It is enabled with the <spanx style="emph">I</spanx> bit (Table. <xref target="flags-encoding">flags-encoding</xref>). The use of intra energy is OPTIONAL and the decision method is left to the implementor. The reference code describes one way of deciding which frames would benefit most from having their energy encoded without prediction. The intra_decision() (<xref target="quant_bands.c">quant_bands.c</xref>) function looks for frames where the log-spectral distance between consecutive frames is more than 9 dB. When such a difference is found between two frames, the next frame (not the one for which the difference is detected) is marked encoded with intra energy. The one-frame delay is to ensure that when a frame containing a transient is lost, then the next frame will be decoded without accumulating error from the lost frame.
523 </t>
524 </section>
525
526 <section anchor="pitch" title="Pitch prediction (P)">
527 <t>
528 CELT can use a pitch predictor (also known as long-term predictor) to improve the voice quality at lower bit-rates. While the pitch period can be estimated in any way, it is RECOMMENDED for performance reasons to estimate it using a frequency-domain correlation between the current frame and the history buffer, as implemented in find_spectral_pitch() (<xref target="pitch.c">pitch.c</xref>). When the <spanx style="emph">P</spanx> bit is set, the pitch period is encoded after the flag bits. The value encoded is an integer in the range [0, 1024-N-overlap-1].
529 </t>
530 </section>
531
532 <section anchor="short-blocks" title="Short blocks (S)">
533 <t>
534 To improve audio quality during transients, CELT can use a <spanx style="emph">short block</spanx> multiple-MDCT transform. Unlike other transform codecs, the multiple MDCTs are jointly quantized as if the coefficients were obtained from a single MDCT. For that reason, it is better to consider the short block case as using a different transform of the same length rather than as multiple independent MDCTs. In the reference implementation, the decision to use short blocks is made by transient_analysis() (<xref target="celt.c">celt.c</xref>) based on the pre-emphasized signal's peak values, but other methods can be used. When the <spanx style="emph">S</spanx> bit is set, a 2-bit transient scalefactor is encoded directly after the flag bits. If the scalefactor is 0, then the multiple-MDCT output is unmodified. If the scalefactor is 1 or 2, then the output of the MDCTs that follow the transient is scaled down by 2^scalefactor. If the scalefactor is equal to 3, then a time-domain window is applied <spanx style="strong">before</spanx> computing the MDCTs and no further scaling is applied to the MDCTs output. The window value is 1 from the beginning of the frame to 16 samples before the transient time. It is a Hanning window from there to the transient time, and then the value is 1/8 up to the end of the frame. The Hanning window part is defined as:
535 </t>
536
537 <t>
538 static const float transientWindow[16] = {
539    0.0085135, 0.0337639, 0.0748914, 0.1304955, 
540    0.1986827, 0.2771308, 0.3631685, 0.4538658,
541    0.5461342, 0.6368315, 0.7228692, 0.8013173, 
542    0.8695045, 0.9251086, 0.9662361, 0.9914865};
543 </t>
544
545 <t>When the scalefactor is 3, the transient time is encoded as an integer in the range [0, N+overlap-1] directly after the scalefactor.</t>
546
547
548 <t>
549 In the case where the scalefactor is 1 or 2 and the mode is defined to use more than 2 MDCTs, the last MDCT to which the scaling is <spanx style="strong">not</spanx> applied is encoded using an integer in the range [0, B-2], where B is the number of short MDCTs used for the mode. 
550 </t>
551 </section>
552
553 <section anchor="folding" title="Spectral folding (F)">
554 <t>
555 The last encoding feature in CELT is spectral folding. It is designed to prevent <spanx style="emph">birdie</spanx> artifacts caused by the sparse spectra often generated by low-bitrate transform codecs. When folding is enabled, a copy of the low-frequency spectrum is added to the higher-frequency bands (above ~6400 Hz). The folding operation is described in more detail in <xref target="pvq"></xref>.
556 </t>
557 </section>
558
559 </section>
560
561 <section anchor="forward-mdct" title="Forward MDCT">
562
563 <t>The MDCT implementation has no special characteristics. The
564 input is a windowed signal (after pre-emphasis) of 2*N samples and the output is N
565 frequency-domain samples. A <spanx style="emph">low-overlap</spanx> window is used to reduce the algorithmic delay. 
566 It is derived from a basic (full overlap) window that is the same as the one used in the Vorbis codec: W(n)=[sin(pi/2*sin(pi/2*(n+.5)/L))]^2. The low-overlap window is created by zero-padding the basic window and inserting ones in the middle, such that the resulting window still satisfies power complementarity. The MDCT is computed in mdct_forward() (<xref target="mdct.c">mdct.c</xref>), which includes the windowing operation and a scaling of 2/N.
567 </t>
568 </section>
569
570 <section anchor="normalization" title="Bands and Normalization">
571 <t>
572 The MDCT output is divided into bands that are designed to match the ear's critical bands,
573 with the exception that each band has to be at least 3 bins wide. For each band, the encoder
574 computes the energy that will later be encoded. Each band is then normalized by the 
575 square root of the <spanx style="strong">non-quantized</spanx> energy, such that each band now forms a unit vector X.
576 The energy and the normalization are computed by compute_band_energies()
577 and normalise_bands() (<xref target="bands.c">bands.c</xref>), respectively.
578 </t>
579 </section>
580
581 <section anchor="energy-quantization" title="Energy Envelope Quantization">
582
583 <t>
584 It is important to quantize the energy with sufficient resolution because
585 any energy quantization error cannot be compensated for at a later
586 stage. Regardless of the resolution used for encoding the shape of a band,
587 it is perceptually important to preserve the energy in each band. CELT uses a
588 coarse-fine strategy for encoding the energy in the base-2 log domain, 
589 as implemented in <xref target="quant_bands.c">quant_bands.c</xref></t>
590
591 <section anchor="coarse-energy" title="Coarse energy quantization">
592 <t>
593 The coarse quantization of the energy uses a fixed resolution of
594 6 dB and is the only place where entropy coding is used.
595 To minimize the bitrate, prediction is applied both in time (using the previous frame)
596 and in frequency (using the previous bands). The 2-D z-transform of
597 the prediction filter is: A(z_l, z_b)=(1-a*z_l^-1)*(1-z_b^-1)/(1-b*z_b^-1)
598 where b is the band index and l is the frame index. The prediction coefficients are
599 a=0.8 and b=0.7 when not using intra energy and a=b=0 when using intra energy. 
600 The prediction is applied on the quantized log-energy. We approximate the ideal 
601 probability distribution of the prediction error using a Laplace distribution. The
602 coarse energy quantization is performed by quant_coarse_energy() and 
603 quant_coarse_energy() (<xref target="quant_bands.c">quant_bands.c</xref>).
604 </t>
605
606 <t>
607 The Laplace distribution for each band is defined by a 16-bit (Q15) decay parameter.
608 Thus, the value 0 has a frequency count of p[0]=2*(16384*(16384-decay)/(16384+decay)). The 
609 values +/- i each have a frequency count p[i] = (p[i-1]*decay)>>14. The value of p[i] is always
610 rounded down (to avoid exceeding 32768 as the sum of all frequency counts), so it is possible
611 for the sum to be less than 32768. In that case additional values with a frequency count of 1 are encoded. The signed values corresponding to symbols 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, ... 
612 are [0, +1, -1, +2, -2, ...]. The encoding of the Laplace-distributed values is 
613 implemented in ec_laplace_encode() (<xref target="laplace.c">laplace.c</xref>).
614 </t>
615 <!-- FIXME: bit budget consideration -->
616 </section> <!-- coarse energy -->
617
618 <section anchor="fine-energy" title="Fine energy quantization">
619 <t>
620 After the coarse energy quantization and encoding, the bit allocation is computed 
621 (<xref target="allocation"></xref>) and the number of bits to use for refining the
622 energy quantization is determined for each band. Let B_i be the number of fine energy bits 
623 for band i; the refinement is an integer f in the range [0,2^B_i-1]. The mapping between f
624 and the correction applied to the coarse energy is equal to (f+1/2)/2^B_i - 1/2. Fine
625 energy quantization is implemented in quant_fine_energy() 
626 (<xref target="quant_bands.c">quant_bands.c</xref>).
627 </t>
628
629 <t>
630 If any bits are unused at the end of the encoding process, these bits are used to
631 increase the resolution of the fine energy encoding in some bands. Priority is given
632 to the bands for which the allocation (<xref target="allocation"></xref>) was rounded
633 down. At the same level of priority, lower bands are encoded first. Refinement bits
634 are added until there are no unused bits. This is implemented in quant_energy_finalise() 
635 (<xref target="quant_bands.c">quant_bands.c</xref>).
636 </t>
637
638 </section> <!-- fine energy -->
639
640
641 </section> <!-- Energy quant -->
642
643 <section anchor="allocation" title="Bit Allocation">
644 <t>Bit allocation is performed based only on information available to both
645 the encoder and decoder. The same calculations are performed in a bit-exact
646 manner in both the encoder and decoder to ensure that the result is always
647 exactly the same. Any mismatch would cause an error in the decoded output.
648 The allocation is computed by compute_allocation() (<xref target="rate.c">rate.c</xref>),
649 which is used in both the encoder and the decoder.</t>
650
651 <t>For a given band, the bit allocation is nearly constant across
652 frames that use the same number of bits for Q1, yielding a 
653 pre-defined signal-to-mask ratio (SMR) for each band. Because the
654 bands each have a width of one Bark, this is equivalent to modeling the
655 masking occurring within each critical band, while ignoring inter-band
656 masking and tone-vs-noise characteristics. While this is not an
657 optimal bit allocation, it provides good results without requiring the
658 transmission of any allocation information.
659 </t>
660
661 </section>
662
663 <section anchor="pitch-prediction" title="Pitch Prediction">
664 <t>
665 The pitch period T is computed in the frequency domain using a generalized 
666 cross-correlation, as implemented in find_spectral_pitch()
667 (<xref target="pitch.c">pitch.c</xref>). An MDCT is then computed on the 
668 synthesis signal memory using the offset T. 
669 If there is sufficient energy in this
670 part of the signal, the pitch gain for each pitch band
671 is computed as g_a = X^T*p, where X is the normalized (non-quantized) signal and
672 p is the normalized pitch MDCT.
673 The gain is computed by compute_pitch_gain() (<xref target="bands.c">bands.c</xref>), 
674 and if a sufficient number of bands have a high enough gain, then the pitch bit is set.
675 Otherwise, no use of pitch is made.
676 </t>
677
678 <t>
679 For frequencies above the highest pitch band (~6374 Hz), the pitch prediction is replaced by
680 spectral folding if and only if the folding bit is set. Spectral folding is implemented in 
681 intra_fold() (<xref target="vq.c">vq.c</xref>). If the folding bit is not set, then 
682 the prediction is simply set to zero.
683 The folding prediction uses the quantized spectrum at lower frequencies with a gain that depends
684 both on the width of the band, N, and the number of pulses allocated, K:
685 </t>
686
687 <t>
688 g_a = N / (N + 2*K*(K+1)),
689 </t>
690
691 <t>
692 When the short block bit is not set, the spectral copy is performed starting with bin 0 (DC) and going up. When the short block bit is set, then the starting point is chosen between 0 and B-1 in such a way that the source and destination bins belong to the same MDCT (i.e., to prevent the folding from causing pre-echo). Before the folding operation, each band of the source spectrum is multiplied by sqrt(N) so that the expected value of the squared value for each bin is equal to 1. The copied spectrum is then renormalized to have norm (||p|| = g_a).
693 </t>
694
695 <t>For stereo streams, the folding is performed independently for each channel.</t>
696
697 </section>
698
699 <section anchor="pvq" title="Spherical Vector Quantization">
700 <t>CELT uses a Pyramid Vector Quantization (PVQ) <xref target="PVQ"></xref>
701 codebook for quantizing the details of the spectrum in each band that have not
702 been predicted by the pitch predictor. The PVQ codebook consists of all sums
703 of K signed pulses in a vector of N samples, where two pulses at the same position
704 are required to have the same sign. Thus the codebook includes 
705 all integer codevectors y of N dimensions that satisfy sum(abs(y(j))) = K.
706 </t>
707
708 <t>
709 In bands where neither pitch nor folding is used, the PVQ is used to encode
710 the unit vector that results from the normalization in 
711 <xref target="normalization"></xref> directly. Given a PVQ codevector y, 
712 the unit vector X is obtained as X = y/||y||, where ||.|| denotes the 
713 L2 norm. In the case where a pitch
714 prediction or a folding vector p is used, the quantized unit vector X' becomes:
715 </t>
716 <t>X' = p' + g_f * y,</t>
717 <t>where g_f = ( sqrt( (y^T*p')^2 + ||y||^2*(1-||p'||^2) ) - y^T*p' ) / ||y||^2, </t>
718
719 <t>and p' = g_a * p.</t>
720
721 <t>The combination of the pitch with the PVQ codeword is described in 
722 mix_pitch_and_residual() (<xref target="vq.c">vq.c</xref>) and is used in
723 both the encoder and the decoder.
724 </t>
725
726 <section anchor="bits-pulses" title="Bits to Pulses">
727 <t>
728 Although the allocation is performed in bits units, the quantization requires
729 an integer number of pulses K. To do this, the encoder searches for the value
730 of K that produces the number of bits that is the nearest to the allocated value
731 (rounding down if exactly half-way between two values), subject to not exceeding
732 the total number of bits available. The computation is performed in 1/16 of
733 bits using log2_frac() and ec_enc_tell(). The number of codebooks entries can
734 be computed as explained in <xref target="cwrs-encoding"></xref>. The difference
735 between the number of bits allocated and the number of bits used is accumulated to a
736 <spanx style="emph">balance</spanx> (initialised to zero) that helps adjusting the
737 allocation for the next bands. One third of the balance is subtracted from the
738 bit allocation of the next band to help achieving the target allocation. The only
739 exceptions are the band before the last and the last band, for which half the balance
740 and the whole balance are subtracted, respectively.
741 </t>
742 </section>
743
744 <section anchor="pvq-search" title="PVQ Search">
745
746 <t>
747 The search for the best codevector y is performed by alg_quant()
748 (<xref target="vq.c">vq.c</xref>). There are several possible approaches to the 
749 search with a tradeoff between quality and complexity. The method used in the reference
750 implementation computes an initial codeword y1 by projecting the residual signal 
751 R = X - p' onto the codebook pyramid of K-1 pulses:
752 </t>
753 <t>
754 y0 = round_towards_zero( (K-1) * R / sum(abs(R)))
755 </t>
756
757 <t>
758 Depending on N, K and the input data, the initial codeword y0 may contain from 
759 0 to K-1 non-zero values. All the remaining pulses, with the exception of the last one, 
760 are found iteratively with a greedy search that minimizes the normalized correlation
761 between y and R:
762 </t>
763
764 <t>
765 J = -R^T*y / ||y||
766 </t>
767
768 <t>
769 The last pulse is the only one considering the pitch and minimizes the cost function <xref target="celt-tasl"></xref>:
770 </t>
771
772 <t>
773 J = -g_f * R^T*y + (g_f)^2 * ||y||^2
774 </t>
775
776 <t>
777 The search described above is considered to be a good trade-off between quality
778 and computational cost. However, there are other possible ways to search the PVQ
779 codebook and the implementors MAY use any other search methods.
780 </t>
781 </section>
782
783
784 <section anchor="cwrs-encoding" title="Index Encoding">
785 <t>
786 The best PVQ codeword is encoded as a uniformly-distributed integer value
787 by encode_pulses() (<xref target="cwrs.c">cwrs.c</xref>).
788 The codeword is converted to a unique index in the same way as specified in 
789 <xref target="PVQ"></xref>. The indexing is based on the calculation of V(N,K) (denoted N(L,K) in <xref target="PVQ"></xref>), which is the number of possible combinations of K pulses 
790 in N samples. The number of combinations can be computed recursively as 
791 V(N,K) = V(N+1,K) + V(N,K+1) + V(N+1,K+1), with V(N,0) = 1 and V(0,K) = 0, K != 0. 
792 There are many different ways to compute V(N,K), including pre-computed tables and direct
793 use of the recursive formulation. The reference implementation applies the recursive
794 formulation one line (or column) at a time to save on memory use,
795 along with an alternate,
796 univariate recurrence to initialise an arbitrary line, and direct
797 polynomial solutions for small N. All of these methods are
798 equivalent, and have different trade-offs in speed, memory usage, and
799 code size. Implementations MAY use any methods they like, as long as
800 they are equivalent to the mathematical definition.
801 </t>
802
803 <t>
804 The indexing computations are performed using 32-bit unsigned integers. For large codebooks,
805 32-bit integers are not sufficient. Instead of using 64-bit integers (or more), the encoding
806 is made slightly sub-optimal by splitting each band into two equal (or near-equal) vectors of
807 size (N+1)/2 and N/2, respectively. The number of pulses in the first half, K1, is first encoded as an
808 integer in the range [0,K]. Then, two codebooks are encoded with V((N+1)/2, K1) and V(N/2, K-K1). 
809 The split operation is performed recursively, in case one (or both) of the split vectors 
810 still requires more than 32 bits. For compatibility reasons, the handling of codebooks of more 
811 than 32 bits MUST be implemented with the splitting method, even if 64-bit arithmetic is available.
812 </t>
813 </section>
814
815 </section>
816
817
818 <section anchor="stereo" title="Stereo support">
819 <t>
820 When encoding a stereo stream, some parameters are shared across the left and right channels, while others are transmitted separately for each channel, or jointly encoded. Only one copy of the flags for the features, transients and pitch (pitch period and gains) are transmitted. The coarse and fine energy parameters are transmitted separately for each channel. Both the coarse energy and fine energy (including the remaining fine bits at the end of the stream) have the left and right bands interleaved in the stream, with the left band encoded first.
821 </t>
822
823 <t>
824 The main difference between mono and stereo coding is the PVQ coding of the normalized vectors. For bands of N=3 or N=4 samples, the PVQ coding is performed separately for left and right, with at most one (joint) pitch bit. The left channel of each band is encoded before the right channel of the same band. Each band always uses the same number of pulses for left as for right. For bands of N>=5 samples, a normalized mid-side (M-S) encoding is used. Let L and R be the normalized vector of a certain band for the left and right channels, respectively. The mid and side vectors are computed as M=L+R and S=L-R and no longer have unit norm.
825 </t>
826
827 <t>
828 From M and S, an angular parameter theta=2/pi*atan2(||S||, ||M||) is computed. It is quantized on a scale from 0 to 1 with an interval of 2^-qb, where qb = (b-2*(N-1)*(40-log2_frac(N,4)))/(32*(N-1)), b is the number of bits allocated to the band, and log2_frac() is defined in <xref target="cwrs.c">cwrs.c</xref>. Let m=M/||M|| and s=S/||S||; m and s are separately encoded with the PVQ encoder described in <xref target="pvq"></xref>. The number of bits allocated to m and s depends on the value of itheta, which is a fixed-point (Q14) representation of theta. The value of itheta needs to be treated in a bit-exact manner since both the encoder and decoder rely on it to infer the bit allocation. The number of bits allocated to coding m is obtained by:
829 </t>
830
831 <t>
832 <list>
833 <t>imid = bitexact_cos(itheta);</t>
834 <t>iside = bitexact_cos(16384-itheta);</t>
835 <t>delta = (N-1)*(log2_frac(iside,6)-log2_frac(imid,6))>>2;</t>
836 <t>mbits = (b-qalloc/2-delta)/2;</t>
837 </list>
838 </t>
839
840 </section>
841
842
843 <section anchor="synthesis" title="Synthesis">
844 <t>
845 After all the quantization is completed, the quantized energy is used along with the 
846 quantized normalized band data to resynthesize the MDCT spectrum. The inverse MDCT (<xref target="inverse-mdct"></xref>) and the weighted overlap-add are applied and the signal is stored in the <spanx style="emph">synthesis buffer</spanx> so it can be used for pitch prediction. 
847 The encoder MAY omit this step of the processing if it knows that it will not be using
848 the pitch predictor for the next few frames. If the de-emphasis filter (<xref target="inverse-mdct"></xref>) is applied to this resynthesized
849 signal, then the output will be the same (within numerical precision) as the decoder's output. 
850 </t>
851 </section>
852
853 <section anchor="vbr" title="Variable Bitrate (VBR)">
854 <t>
855 Each CELT frame can be encoded in a different number of octets, making it possible to vary the bitrate at will. This property can be used to implement source-controlled variable bitrate (VBR). Support for VBR is OPTIONAL for the encoder, but a decoder MUST be prepared to decode a stream that changes its bit-rate dynamically. The method used to vary the bit-rate in VBR mode is left to the implementor, as long as each frame can be decoded by the reference decoder.
856 </t>
857 </section>
858
859 </section>
860
861 <section anchor="CELT-decoder" title="CELT Decoder">
862
863 <t>
864 Like most audio codecs, the CELT decoder is less complex than the encoder, as can be
865 observed in the decoder block diagram in <xref target="decoder-diagram"></xref>.
866 </t>
867
868 <figure anchor="decoder-diagram">
869 <artwork>
870 <![CDATA[
871                        +--+
872                        |Q1|-------------+
873                        +--+             |
874                                         v
875                        +--+  +-----+  +---+  +-----+
876                        |Q3|->| Mix |->| * |->|IMDCT|-+-> output
877                        +--+  +-----+  +---+  +-----+ |
878                          ^      ^                    |
879                          +------+                    |
880                                 |                    |
881                        +--+   +-+-+                  |
882                        |Q2|-->| * |                  |
883                        +--+   +---+                  |
884                                 ^                    |
885                                 |                    |
886                          +------+-----+              |
887          +------------+  |Delay, MDCT,|              |
888          |Pitch period|->|  Normalize |              |
889          +------------+  +------------+              |
890                                 ^                    |
891                                 +--------------------+
892 ]]>
893 </artwork>
894 <postamble>Block diagram of the CELT decoder</postamble>
895 </figure>
896
897 <t>
898 If during the decoding process a decoded integer value is out of the specified range
899 (which can happen due to a minimal amount of redundancy in the encoding of large integers with
900 the range coder), then the decoder knows there has been an error in the coding, 
901 decoding, or transmission and SHOULD take measures to conceal the error and/or report
902 to the application that a problem has occurred.
903 </t>
904
905 <section anchor="range-decoder" title="Range Decoder">
906 <t>
907 The range decoder extracts the symbols and integers encoded using the range encoder in
908 <xref target="range-encoder"></xref>. The range decoder maintains an internal
909 state vector composed of the two-tuple (dif,rng), representing the
910 difference between the high end of the current range and the actual
911 coded value, and the size of the current range, respectively. Both
912 dif and rng are 32-bit unsigned integer values. rng is initialized to
913 2^7. dif is initialized to rng minus the top 7 bits of the first
914 input octet. Then the range is immediately normalized, using the
915 procedure described in the following section.
916 </t>
917
918 <section anchor="decoding-symbols" title="Decoding Symbols">
919 <t>
920    Decoding symbols is a two-step process. The first step determines
921    a value fs that lies within the range of some symbol in the current
922    context. The second step updates the range decoder state with the
923    three-tuple (fl,fh,ft) corresponding to that symbol, as defined in
924    <xref target="encoding-symbols"></xref>.
925 </t>
926 <t>
927    The first step is implemented by ec_decode() 
928    (<xref target="rangedec.c">rangedec.c</xref>), 
929    and computes fs = ft-min((dif-1)/(rng/ft)+1,ft), where ft is
930    the sum of the frequency counts in the current context, as described
931    in <xref target="encoding-symbols"></xref>. The divisions here are exact integer division. 
932 </t>
933 <t>
934    In the reference implementation, a special version of ec_decode()
935    called ec_decode_bin() (<xref target="rangeenc.c">rangeenc.c</xref>) is defined using
936    the parameter ftb instead of ft. It is mathematically equivalent to
937    calling ec_decode() with ft = (1&lt;&lt;ftb), but avoids one of the
938    divisions.
939 </t>
940 <t>
941    The decoder then identifies the symbol in the current context
942    corresponding to fs; i.e., the one whose three-tuple (fl,fh,ft)
943    satisfies fl &lt;= fs &lt; fh. This tuple is used to update the decoder
944    state according to dif = dif - (rng/ft)*(ft-fh), and if fl is greater
945    than zero, rng = (rng/ft)*(fh-fl), or otherwise rng = rng - (rng/ft)*(ft-fh). After this update, the range is normalized.
946 </t>
947 <t>
948    To normalize the range, the following process is repeated until
949    rng > 2^23. First, rng is set to (rng&lt;8)&amp;0xFFFFFFFF. Then the next
950    8 bits of input are read into sym, using the remaining bit from the
951    previous input octet as the high bit of sym, and the top 7 bits of the
952    next octet for the remaining bits of sym. If no more input octets
953    remain, zero bits are used instead. Then, dif is set to
954    (dif&lt;&lt;8)-sym&amp;0xFFFFFFFF (i.e., using wrap-around if the subtraction
955    overflows a 32-bit register). Finally, if dif is larger than 2^31,
956    dif is then set to dif - 2^31. This process is carried out by
957    ec_dec_normalize() (<xref target="rangedec.c">rangedec.c</xref>).
958 </t>
959 </section>
960
961 <section anchor="decoding-ints" title="Decoding Uniformly Distributed Integers">
962 <t>
963    Functions ec_dec_uint() or ec_dec_bits() are based on ec_decode() and
964    decode one of N equiprobable symbols, each with a frequency of 1,
965    where N may be as large as 2^32-1. Because ec_decode() is limited to
966    a total frequency of 2^16-1, this is done by decoding a series of
967    symbols in smaller contexts.
968 </t>
969 <t>
970    ec_dec_bits() (<xref target="entdec.c">entdec.c</xref>) is defined, like
971    ec_decode_bin(), to take a single parameter ftb, with ftb &lt; 32.
972    and ftb &lt; 32, and produces an ftb-bit decoded integer value, t,
973    initialized to zero. While ftb is greater than 8, it decodes the next
974    8 most significant bits of the integer, s = ec_decode_bin(8), updates
975    the decoder state with the 3-tuple (s,s+1,256), adds those bits to
976    the current value of t, t = t&lt;&lt;8 | s, and subtracts 8 from ftb. Then
977    it decodes the remaining bits of the integer, s = ec_decode_bin(ftb),
978    updates the decoder state with the 3 tuple (s,s+1,1&lt;&lt;ftb), and adds
979    those bits to the final values of t, t = t&lt;&lt;ftb | s.
980 </t>
981 <t>
982    ec_dec_uint() (<xref target="entdec.c">entdec.c</xref>) takes a single parameter,
983    ft, which is not necessarily a power of two, and returns an integer,
984    t, with a value between 0 and ft-1, inclusive, which is initialized to zero. Let
985    ftb be the location of the highest 1 bit in the two's-complement
986    representation of (ft-1), or -1 if no bits are set. If ftb>8, then
987    the top 8 bits of t are decoded using t = ec_decode((ft-1>>ftb-8)+1),
988    the decoder state is updated with the three-tuple
989    (s,s+1,(ft-1>>ftb-8)+1), and the remaining bits are decoded with
990    t = t&lt;&lt;ftb-8|ec_dec_bits(ftb-8). If, at this point, t >= ft, then
991    the current frame is corrupt, and decoding should stop. If the
992    original value of ftb was not greater than 8, then t is decoded with
993    t = ec_decode(ft), and the decoder state is updated with the
994    three-tuple (t,t+1,ft).
995 </t>
996 </section>
997
998 <section anchor="decoder-tell" title="Current Bit Usage">
999 <t>
1000    The bit allocation routines in CELT need to be able to determine a
1001    conservative upper bound on the number of bits that have been used
1002    to decode from the current frame thus far. This drives allocation
1003    decisions which must match those made in the encoder. This is
1004    computed in the reference implementation to fractional bit precision
1005    by the function ec_dec_tell() (<xref target="rangedec.c">rangedec.c</xref>). Like all
1006    operations in the range decoder, it must be implemented in a
1007    bit-exact manner, and must produce exactly the same value returned by
1008    ec_enc_tell() after encoding the same symbols.
1009 </t>
1010 </section>
1011
1012 </section>
1013
1014 <section anchor="energy-decoding" title="Energy Envelope Decoding">
1015 <t>
1016 The energy of each band is extracted from the bit-stream in two steps according
1017 to the same coarse-fine strategy used in the encoder. First, the coarse energy is
1018 decoded in unquant_coarse_energy() (<xref target="quant_bands.c">quant_bands.c</xref>)
1019 based on the probability of the Laplace model used by the encoder.
1020 </t>
1021
1022 <t>
1023 After the coarse energy is decoded, the same allocation function as used in the
1024 encoder is called (<xref target="allocation"></xref>). This determines the number of
1025 bits to decode for the fine energy quantization. The decoding of the fine energy bits
1026 is performed by unquant_fine_energy() (<xref target="quant_bands.c">quant_bands.c</xref>).
1027 Finally, like the encoder, the remaining bits in the stream (that would otherwise go unused)
1028 are decoded using unquant_energy_finalise() (<xref target="quant_bands.c">quant_bands.c</xref>).
1029 </t>
1030 </section>
1031
1032 <section anchor="pitch-decoding" title="Pitch prediction decoding">
1033 <t>
1034 If the pitch bit is set, then the pitch period is extracted from the bit-stream. The pitch
1035 gain bits are extracted within the PVQ decoding as encoded by the encoder. When the folding
1036 bit is set, the folding prediction is computed in exactly the same way as the encoder, 
1037 with the same gain, by the function intra_fold() (<xref target="vq.c">vq.c</xref>).
1038 </t>
1039
1040 </section>
1041
1042 <section anchor="PVQ-decoder" title="Spherical VQ Decoder">
1043 <t>
1044 In order to correctly decode the PVQ codewords, the decoder must perform exactly the same
1045 bits to pulses conversion as the encoder (see <xref target="bits-pulses"></xref>).
1046 </t>
1047
1048 <section anchor="cwrs-decoder" title="Index Decoding">
1049 <t>
1050 The decoding of the codeword from the index is performed as specified in 
1051 <xref target="PVQ"></xref>, as implemented in function
1052 decode_pulses() (<xref target="cwrs.c">cwrs.c</xref>). 
1053 </t>
1054 </section>
1055
1056 <section anchor="normalised-decoding" title="Normalised Vector Decoding">
1057 <t>
1058 The spherical codebook is decoded by alg_unquant() (<xref target="vq.c">vq.c</xref>).
1059 The index of the PVQ entry is obtained from the range coder and converted to 
1060 a pulse vector by decode_pulses() (<xref target="cwrs.c">cwrs.c</xref>).
1061 </t>
1062
1063 <t>The decoded normalized vector for each band is equal to</t>
1064 <t>X' = p' + g_f * y,</t>
1065 <t>where g_f = ( sqrt( (y^T*p')^2 + ||y||^2*(1-||p'||^2) ) - y^T*p' ) / ||y||^2, </t>
1066 <t>and p' = g_a * p.</t>
1067
1068 <t>
1069 This operation is implemented in mix_pitch_and_residual() (<xref target="vq.c">vq.c</xref>), 
1070 which is the same function as used in the encoder.
1071 </t>
1072 </section>
1073
1074
1075 </section>
1076
1077 <section anchor="denormalization" title="Denormalization">
1078 <t>
1079 Just like each band was normalized in the encoder, the last step of the decoder before
1080 the inverse MDCT is to denormalize the bands. Each decoded normalized band is
1081 multiplied by the square root of the decoded energy. This is done by denormalise_bands()
1082 (<xref target="bands.c">bands.c</xref>).
1083 </t>
1084 </section>
1085
1086 <section anchor="inverse-mdct" title="Inverse MDCT">
1087 <t>The inverse MDCT implementation has no special characteristics. The
1088 input is N frequency-domain samples and the output is 2*N time-domain 
1089 samples, while scaling by 1/2. The output is windowed using the same
1090 <spanx style="emph">low-overlap</spanx> window 
1091 as the encoder. The IMDCT and windowing are performed by mdct_backward
1092 (<xref target="mdct.c">mdct.c</xref>). After the overlap-add process, 
1093 the signal is de-emphasized using the inverse of the pre-emphasis filter 
1094 used in the encoder: 1/A(z)=1/(1-alpha_p*z^-1).
1095 </t>
1096 </section>
1097
1098 <section anchor="Packet Loss Concealment" title="Packet Loss Concealment (PLC)">
1099 <t>
1100 Packet loss concealment (PLC) is an optional decoder-side feature which 
1101 SHOULD be included when transmitting over an unreliable channel. Because 
1102 PLC is not part of the bit-stream, there are several possible ways to 
1103 implement PLC with different complexity/quality trade-offs. The PLC in
1104 the reference implementation finds a periodicity in the decoded
1105 signal and repeats the windowed waveform using the pitch offset. The windowed
1106 waveform is overlapped in such a way as to preserve the time-domain aliasing
1107 cancellation with the previous frame and the next frame. This is implemented 
1108 in celt_decode_lost() (<xref target="celt.c">mdct.c</xref>).
1109 </t>
1110 </section>
1111
1112 </section>
1113
1114
1115
1116 <section anchor="Security Considerations" title="Security Considerations">
1117
1118 <t>
1119 A potential denial-of-service threat exists for data encodings using
1120 compression techniques that have non-uniform receiver-end
1121 computational load.  The attacker can inject pathological datagrams
1122 into the stream which are complex to decode and cause the receiver to
1123 become overloaded.  However, this encoding does not exhibit any
1124 significant non-uniformity.
1125 </t>
1126
1127 <t>
1128 With the exception of the first four bits, the bit-stream produced by
1129 CELT for an unknown audio stream is not easily predictable, due to the
1130 use of entropy coding. This should make CELT less vulnerable to attacks
1131 based on plaintext guessing when encryption is used. Also, since almost
1132 all possible bit combinations can be interpreted as a valid bit-stream,
1133 it is likely more difficult to determine from the decrypted bit-stream
1134 whether a guessed decryption key is valid.
1135 </t>
1136
1137 <t>
1138 When operating CELT in variable-bitrate (VBR) mode, some of the
1139 properties described above no longer hold. More specifically, the size
1140 of the packet leaks a very small, but non-zero, amount of information
1141 about both the original signal and the bit-stream plaintext.
1142 </t>
1143 </section> 
1144
1145 <!--
1146
1147 <section anchor="Evaluation of CELT Implementations" title="Evaluation of CELT Implementations">
1148
1149 <t>
1150 Insert some text here.
1151 </t>
1152
1153 </section>
1154
1155 -->
1156
1157 <section title="IANA Considerations ">
1158 <t>
1159 This document has no actions for IANA.
1160 </t>
1161 </section>
1162
1163
1164 <section anchor="Acknowledgments" title="Acknowledgments">
1165
1166 <t>
1167 The authors would also like to thank the CELT users who contributed source code, feature requests, suggestions or comments. Many thanks to Christopher "Monty" Montgomery for critical listening and help in the tuning phase. 
1168 </t>
1169 </section> 
1170
1171 </middle>
1172
1173 <back>
1174
1175 <references title="Normative References">
1176
1177 <reference anchor="rfc2119">
1178 <front>
1179 <title>Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate Requirement Levels </title>
1180 <author initials="S." surname="Bradner" fullname="Scott Bradner"><organization/></author>
1181 </front>
1182 <seriesInfo name="RFC" value="2119" />
1183 </reference> 
1184
1185 <reference anchor="rfc3550">
1186 <front>
1187 <title>RTP: A Transport Protocol for real-time applications</title>
1188 <author initials="H." surname="Schulzrinne" fullname=""><organization/></author>
1189 <author initials="S." surname="Casner" fullname=""><organization/></author>
1190 <author initials="R." surname="Frederick" fullname=""><organization/></author>
1191 <author initials="V." surname="Jacobson" fullname=""><organization/></author>
1192 </front>
1193 <seriesInfo name="RFC" value="3550" />
1194 </reference> 
1195
1196
1197 </references> 
1198
1199 <references title="Informative References">
1200
1201 <reference anchor="celt-tasl">
1202 <front>
1203 <title>A High-Quality Speech and Audio Codec With Less Than 10 ms delay</title>
1204 <author initials="JM" surname="Valin" fullname="Jean-Marc Valin"><organization/></author>
1205 <author initials="T. B." surname="Terriberry" fullname="Timothy Terriberry"><organization/></author>
1206 <author initials="C." surname="Montgomery" fullname="Christopher Montgomery"><organization/></author>
1207 <author initials="G." surname="Maxwell" fullname="Gregory Maxwell"><organization/></author>
1208 </front>
1209 <seriesInfo name="To appear in IEEE Transactions on Audio, Speech and Language Processing" value="2009" />
1210 </reference> 
1211
1212 <reference anchor="celt-eusipco">
1213 <front>
1214 <title>A Full-Bandwidth Audio Codec with Low Complexity and Very Low Delay</title>
1215 <author initials="JM" surname="Valin" fullname="Jean-Marc Valin"><organization/></author>
1216 <author initials="T. B." surname="Terriberry" fullname="Timothy Terriberry"><organization/></author>
1217 <author initials="G." surname="Maxwell" fullname="Gregory Maxwell"><organization/></author>
1218 </front>
1219 <seriesInfo name="Accepted for EUSIPCO" value="2009" />
1220 </reference> 
1221
1222 <reference anchor="celt-website">
1223 <front>
1224 <title>The CELT ultra-low delay audio codec</title>
1225 <author><organization/></author>
1226 </front>
1227 <seriesInfo name="CELT website" value="http://www.celt-codec.org/" />
1228 </reference> 
1229
1230 <reference anchor="mdct">
1231 <front>
1232 <title>Modified Discrete Cosine Transform</title>
1233 <author><organization/></author>
1234 </front>
1235 <seriesInfo name="MDCT" value="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modified_discrete_cosine_transform" />
1236 </reference> 
1237
1238 <reference anchor="range-coding">
1239 <front>
1240 <title>Range encoding: An algorithm for removing redundancy from a digitised message</title>
1241 <author initials="G." surname="Nigel" fullname=""><organization/></author>
1242 <author initials="N." surname="Martin" fullname=""><organization/></author>
1243 <date year="1979" />
1244 </front>
1245 <seriesInfo name="Proc. Institution of Electronic and Radio Engineers International Conference on Video and Data Recording" value="" />
1246 </reference> 
1247
1248 <reference anchor="coding-thesis">
1249 <front>
1250 <title>Source coding algorithms for fast data compression</title>
1251 <author initials="R." surname="Pasco" fullname=""><organization/></author>
1252 <date month="May" year="1976" />
1253 </front>
1254 <seriesInfo name="Ph.D. thesis" value="Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University" />
1255 </reference>
1256
1257 <reference anchor="PVQ">
1258 <front>
1259 <title>A Pyramid Vector Quantizer</title>
1260 <author initials="T." surname="Fischer" fullname=""><organization/></author>
1261 <date month="July" year="1986" />
1262 </front>
1263 <seriesInfo name="IEEE Trans. on Information Theory, Vol. 32" value="pp. 568-583" />
1264 </reference> 
1265
1266 </references>
1267
1268 <section anchor="Reference Implementation" title="Reference Implementation">
1269
1270 <t>This appendix contains the complete source code for a reference
1271 implementation of the CELT codec written in C. This floating-point
1272 implementation is derived from the implementation available on the 
1273 <xref target="celt-website"></xref>, which can be compiled for 
1274 either floating-point or fixed-point architectures.
1275 </t>
1276
1277 <t>The implementation can be compiled with either a C89 or a C99
1278 compiler. It is reasonably optimized for most platforms such that
1279 only architecture-specific optimizations are likely to be useful.
1280 The FFT used is a slightly modified version of the KISS-FFT package,
1281 but it is easy to substitute any other FFT library.
1282 </t>
1283
1284 <t>
1285 The testcelt executable can be used to test the encoding and decoding
1286 process:
1287 <list style="empty">
1288 <t><![CDATA[
1289 testcelt <rate> <channels> <frame size> <octets per packet>
1290          [<complexity> [packet loss rate]] <input> <output>
1291 ]]></t>
1292 </list>
1293 where "rate" is the sampling rate in Hz, "channels" is the number of
1294 channels (1 or 2), "frame size" is the number of samples in a frame 
1295 (64 to 512) and "octets per packet" is the number of octets desired for each
1296 compressed frame. The input and output files are assumed to be a 16-bit
1297 PCM file in the machine native endianness. The optional "complexity" argument
1298 can select the quality vs complexity tradeoff (0-10) and the "packet loss rate"
1299 argument simulates random packet loss (argument is in tenths or a percent).
1300 </t>
1301
1302 <?rfc include="xml_source/Makefile"?>
1303 <?rfc include="xml_source/testcelt.c"?>
1304 <?rfc include="xml_source/celt.h"?>
1305 <?rfc include="xml_source/celt.c"?>
1306 <?rfc include="xml_source/modes.h"?>
1307 <?rfc include="xml_source/modes.c"?>
1308 <?rfc include="xml_source/bands.h"?>
1309 <?rfc include="xml_source/bands.c"?>
1310 <?rfc include="xml_source/cwrs.h"?>
1311 <?rfc include="xml_source/cwrs.c"?>
1312 <?rfc include="xml_source/vq.h"?>
1313 <?rfc include="xml_source/vq.c"?>
1314 <?rfc include="xml_source/pitch.h"?>
1315 <?rfc include="xml_source/pitch.c"?>
1316 <?rfc include="xml_source/rate.h"?>
1317 <?rfc include="xml_source/rate.c"?>
1318 <?rfc include="xml_source/psy.h"?>
1319 <?rfc include="xml_source/psy.c"?>
1320 <?rfc include="xml_source/mdct.h"?>
1321 <?rfc include="xml_source/mdct.c"?>
1322 <?rfc include="xml_source/ecintrin.h"?>
1323 <?rfc include="xml_source/entcode.h"?>
1324 <?rfc include="xml_source/entcode.c"?>
1325 <?rfc include="xml_source/entenc.h"?>
1326 <?rfc include="xml_source/entenc.c"?>
1327 <?rfc include="xml_source/entdec.h"?>
1328 <?rfc include="xml_source/entdec.c"?>
1329 <?rfc include="xml_source/mfrngcod.h"?>
1330 <?rfc include="xml_source/rangeenc.c"?>
1331 <?rfc include="xml_source/rangedec.c"?>
1332 <?rfc include="xml_source/laplace.h"?>
1333 <?rfc include="xml_source/laplace.c"?>
1334 <?rfc include="xml_source/quant_bands.h"?>
1335 <?rfc include="xml_source/quant_bands.c"?>
1336 <?rfc include="xml_source/arch.h"?>
1337 <?rfc include="xml_source/mathops.h"?>
1338 <?rfc include="xml_source/os_support.h"?>
1339 <?rfc include="xml_source/stack_alloc.h"?>
1340 <?rfc include="xml_source/celt_types.h"?>
1341 <?rfc include="xml_source/_kiss_fft_guts.h"?>
1342 <?rfc include="xml_source/kiss_fft.h"?>
1343 <?rfc include="xml_source/kiss_fft.c"?>
1344 <?rfc include="xml_source/kiss_fftr.h"?>
1345 <?rfc include="xml_source/kiss_fftr.c"?>
1346 <?rfc include="xml_source/kfft_single.h"?>
1347 <?rfc include="xml_source/kfft_double.h"?>
1348 <?rfc include="xml_source/config.h"?>
1349
1350 </section>
1351
1352
1353 </back>
1354
1355 </rfc>