trivial changes, fixes
authorJosh Coalson <jcoalson@users.sourceforce.net>
Thu, 22 Mar 2001 23:35:22 +0000 (23:35 +0000)
committerJosh Coalson <jcoalson@users.sourceforce.net>
Thu, 22 Mar 2001 23:35:22 +0000 (23:35 +0000)
doc/comparison.html
doc/documentation.html

index b40539c..507ec72 100644 (file)
                The machine I used for encoding the test files is a PII-333 with 256 megs of RAM, running Windows NT 4.0 SP5.  Unfortunately, Windows is the lowest-common-denominator platform for all the encoders.
        </P>
        <P>
-               The input corpus currently consists entirely of CD music tracks.  In the future it may include more kinds of input (like speech, other sample rates, etc).  There are 13 tracks whose genres range from death metal to pop to classical to chant.
+               The input corpus currently consists entirely of CD music tracks.  In the future it may include more kinds of input (like speech, other sample rates/resolutions, etc).  There are 13 tracks whose genres range from death metal to pop to classical to chant.
        </P>
        <P>
                In all tables, the results are sorted by compression ratio, which is compressed size / uncompressed size.  The first table is a summary of results on all input tracks.  The remaining table shows the results of the encoders on each track.
        </P>
        <P>
-               Some interesting things to note: LPAC quality settings are not too stable with -r (which allows seeking during playback) turned on.  In most cases the 'normal' mode makes the smallest file, and much faster.  RKAU also has a tendency to get bigger in the 'high' mode.  Shorten's method for quantizing and transmitting the LPC coefficients is not very good which is the main reason why the fixed predictors runs are both smaller and faster.
+               Some interesting things to note: LPAC quality settings are not too stable with -r (which allows seeking during playback) turned on.  In most cases the 'normal' mode makes the smallest file, and much faster.  RKAU also has a tendency to get bigger in the 'high' mode.  Shorten's method for quantizing and transmitting the LPC coefficients is not very good which is the main reason why the fixed predictor runs are both smaller and faster.
        </P>
        <P>
                Another ironic fact is that the encoders that are patented or cost money turn out to be the worst by most measures.  SPS is so archane and crippled that I gave up trying to put together results for it after one track.
index 95803e1..0005384 100644 (file)
        <TABLE CELLSPACING="0" CELLPADDING="3" WIDTH="100%" BORDER="0" BGCOLOR="#EEEED4">
        <TR><TD><FONT FACE="Lucida,Verdana,Helvetica,Arial">
        <P>
-               <B><TT>flac</TT></B> is the command-line file encoder/decoder.  The input to the encoder and the output to the decoder must either be RIFF WAVE format, or raw interleaved sample data.  <B><TT>flac</TT></B> only supports linear PCM samples (in other words, no A-LAW, uLAW, etc.).  Another restriction (hopefully short-term) is that the input must be 8 or 16 bits per sample.  This is not a limitation of the FLAC format, just the reference encoder.
+               <B><TT>flac</TT></B> is the command-line file encoder/decoder.  The input to the encoder and the output to the decoder must either be RIFF WAVE format, or raw interleaved sample data.  <B><TT>flac</TT></B> only supports linear PCM samples (in other words, no A-LAW, uLAW, etc.).  Another restriction (hopefully short-term) is that the input must be 8, 16, or 24 bits per sample.  This is not a limitation of the FLAC format, just the reference encoder.
        </P>
        <P>
                <B><TT>flac</TT></B> assumes that RIFF WAVE files will have the extension ".wav"; this may be overridden with a command-line option.  Other than this, <B><TT>flac</TT></B> makes no assumptions about file extensions, though the convention is that FLAC files have the extension ".flac" (or ".fla" on ancient file systems like FAT-16).
        </P>
        <P>
-               Before going into the full command-line description, two other things help to sort it out: 1) <B><TT>flac</TT></B> encodes by default, so you must use <B>-d</B> to decode; 2) the options <B><TT>-0</TT></B> .. <B><TT>-9</TT></B> that control the compression level actually are just synonyms for different groups of specific coding options (described later).  You can get the same effect by using the same options.
+               Before going into the full command-line description, two other things help to sort it out: 1) <B><TT>flac</TT></B> encodes by default, so you must use <B>-d</B> to decode; 2) the options <B><TT>-0</TT></B> .. <B><TT>-9</TT></B> that control the compression level actually are just synonyms for different groups of specific encoding options (described later).  You can get the same effect by using the same options.
        </P>
        <P>
                <B><TT>flac</TT></B> will be invoked one of four ways, depending on whether you are encoding, decoding, testing, or analyzing:
                <UL>
                <LI>
-                       Encoding: flac [-s] [--skip #] [&lt;format-options&gt;] [&lt;encoding options&gt;] inputfile outputfile
+                       Encoding: flac [-s] [--skip #] [<I><A HREF="#format_options">&lt;format-options&gt;</A></I>] [<I><A HREF="#encoding_options">&lt;encoding options&gt;</A></I>] inputfile outputfile
                </LI>
                <LI>
-                       Decoding: flac -d [-s] [--skip #] [&lt;format-options&gt;] inputfile outputfile
+                       Decoding: flac -d [-s] [--skip #] [<I><A HREF="#format_options">&lt;format-options&gt;</A></I>] inputfile outputfile
                </LI>
                <LI>
                        Testing: flac -t [-s] inputfile
                </LI>
                <LI>
-                       Analyzing: flac -a [-s] [--skip #] inputfile outputfile
+                       Analyzing: flac -a [-s] [--skip #] [<I><A HREF="#analysis_options">&lt;analysis-options&gt;</A></I>] inputfile outputfile
                </LI>
                </UL>
        </P>
        <TABLE WIDTH="100%" BORDER="1" BGCOLOR="#EEEED4">
                <TR>
                        <TD COLSPAN="2" BGCOLOR="#D3D4C5">
-                               <FONT SIZE="+1"><B>General Options</B></FONT>
+                               <A NAME="general_options"><FONT SIZE="+1"><B>General Options</B></FONT></A>
                        </TD>
                </TR>
                <TR>
        <TABLE WIDTH="100%" BORDER="1" BGCOLOR="#EEEED4">
                <TR>
                        <TD COLSPAN="2" BGCOLOR="#D3D4C5">
-                               <FONT SIZE="+1"><B>Analysis Options</B></FONT>
+                               <A NAME="analysis_options"><FONT SIZE="+1"><B>Analysis Options</B></FONT></A>
                        </TD>
                </TR>
                <TR>
        <TABLE WIDTH="100%" BORDER="1" BGCOLOR="#EEEED4">
                <TR>
                        <TD COLSPAN="2" BGCOLOR="#D3D4C5">
-                               <FONT SIZE="+1"><B>Encoding Options</B></FONT>
+                               <A NAME="encoding_options"><FONT SIZE="+1"><B>Encoding Options</B></FONT></A>
                        </TD>
                </TR>
                <TR>
        <TABLE WIDTH="100%" BORDER="1" BGCOLOR="#EEEED4">
                <TR>
                        <TD COLSPAN="2" BGCOLOR="#D3D4C5">
-                               <FONT SIZE="+1"><B>Format Options</B></FONT>
+                               <A NAME="format_options"><FONT SIZE="+1"><B>Format Options</B></FONT></A>
                        </TD>
                </TR>
                <TR>