minor formatting
authorJosh Coalson <jcoalson@users.sourceforce.net>
Mon, 20 Nov 2006 16:45:37 +0000 (16:45 +0000)
committerJosh Coalson <jcoalson@users.sourceforce.net>
Mon, 20 Nov 2006 16:45:37 +0000 (16:45 +0000)
doc/html/changelog.html
doc/html/comparison.html
doc/html/developers.html
doc/html/documentation.html
doc/html/download.html
doc/html/format.html
doc/html/index.html
doc/html/links.html

index 58c6378..c2341e4 100644 (file)
@@ -53,9 +53,9 @@
        </div>
        <div class="box_header"></div>
        <div class="box_body">
-               This is an informal changelog, a summary of changes in each release.  Particulary important for developers is the precise description of changes to the library interfaces.  See also the <a href="http://flac.sourceforge.net/api/group__porting.html">porting guide</a> for specific instructions on porting to newer versions of FLAC.
+               This is an informal changelog, a summary of changes in each release.  Particulary important for developers is the precise description of changes to the library interfaces.  See also the <a href="http://flac.sourceforge.net/api/group__porting.html">porting guide</a> for specific instructions on porting to newer versions of FLAC.<br />
 
-               <br /><br />
+               <br />
 
                <a name="flac_1_1_3"><b>FLAC 1.1.3</b></a>
 
index 3cfab07..b590f3c 100644 (file)
                                The compression ratios and times for flac are representative only of the reference encoder.  They are not indicative of the limits of all FLAC encoders or the FLAC format itself since the format is open and extensible, and anyone is free to write a better FLAC encoder.
                        </li>
                </ul>
-               I make an effort to keep this information as accurate as possible, but if any of the data is wrong, <a href="mailto:jcoalson@users.sourceforge.net">let me know</a> and I'll correct it.  For another comparison (with graphs) of lossless codecs, see <a href="http://web.inter.nl.net/users/hvdh/lossless/lossless.htm">here</a>.
-               <br /><br />
+               I make an effort to keep this information as accurate as possible, but if any of the data is wrong, <a href="mailto:jcoalson@users.sourceforge.net">let me know</a> and I'll correct it.  For another comparison (with graphs) of lossless codecs, see <a href="http://web.inter.nl.net/users/hvdh/lossless/lossless.htm">here</a>.<br />
+               <br />
                Note: the comparison tables are getting a little stale for some of the other encoders; for some alternate comparisons and other lossless information see these links:
                <ul>
                        <li><a href="http://web.inter.nl.net/users/hvdh/lossless/lossless.htm">Hans Heijden's</a> lossless comparison</li>
                        <li><a href="http://wiki.hydrogenaudio.org/index.php?title=Lossless_comparison">Roberto Amorim's</a> lossless comparison on Hydrogenaudio</li>
                        <li><a href="http://www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums/index.php?showtopic=33226">"Which is the best lossless codec?"</a> thread on Hydrogenaudio</li>
                        <li><a href="http://www.losslessaudioblog.com/">Lossless Audio Blog</a></li>
-               </ul>
-               <br /><br />
+               </ul><br />
+               <br />
                Reviewed encoders (besides flac of course):
                <ul>
                        <li>
                                <a href="http://www.wavpack.com/">WavPack</a> - An open-source codec, released under the BSD license.  WavPack has a very good tradeoff between compressed size and compression speed.
                        </li>
                </ul>
-               If you take maximum compression ratio and speed out of the picture (as you will see later, most coders exhibit similar performance), here is a subjective sort based on overall "usefulness".  As far as features go, having source code gives you the most freedom since you can add anything you need that is missing; besides, open source projects tend to get better faster than closed source ones.  A close second (depending on the user) would be OS support or plugin support.
-               <br /><br />
+               If you take maximum compression ratio and speed out of the picture (as you will see later, most coders exhibit similar performance), here is a subjective sort based on overall "usefulness".  As far as features go, having source code gives you the most freedom since you can add anything you need that is missing; besides, open source projects tend to get better faster than closed source ones.  A close second (depending on the user) would be OS support or plugin support.<br />
+               <br />
                <table width="100%" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" bgcolor="#EEEED4"><tr><td>
                <table width="100%" border="1" bgcolor="#EEEED4">
                        <tr>
                </td></tr></table>
                <br />
 
-               The machine I used for encoding the test files is a PII-333 with 256 megs of RAM, running Windows NT 4.0 SP5.  Unfortunately, Windows is the lowest-common-denominator platform for all the encoders.  Apple Lossless was tested on a newer machine (P4-2.4GHz Windows 2000); only the overall encoding and decoding times are shown, and the times are scaled to the PII-333 by multiplying by the ratio of flac times on the PII to P4.
-               <br /><br />
-               The input corpus currently consists entirely of CD music tracks.  In the future it may include more kinds of input (like speech, other sample rates/resolutions, etc).  There are 14 tracks whose genres range from rock to pop to death metal to classical to chant.
-               <br /><br />
-               The first table is a summary of results on all input tracks.  The remaining tables show the results of the encoders on each track.  The summary table has more modes, whereas the individual tables have just the interesting ones.
-               <br /><br />
-               In the summary table, entries are sorted by average compression ratio, which is the average of the ratios for each track; this keeps long tracks from having more influence than short ones.  In the individual tables, this is the same as the straight compression ratio, which is compressed size / uncompressed size.
-               <br /><br />
+               The machine I used for encoding the test files is a PII-333 with 256 megs of RAM, running Windows NT 4.0 SP5.  Unfortunately, Windows is the lowest-common-denominator platform for all the encoders.  Apple Lossless was tested on a newer machine (P4-2.4GHz Windows 2000); only the overall encoding and decoding times are shown, and the times are scaled to the PII-333 by multiplying by the ratio of flac times on the PII to P4.<br />
+               <br />
+               The input corpus currently consists entirely of CD music tracks.  In the future it may include more kinds of input (like speech, other sample rates/resolutions, etc).  There are 14 tracks whose genres range from rock to pop to death metal to classical to chant.<br />
+               <br />
+               The first table is a summary of results on all input tracks.  The remaining tables show the results of the encoders on each track.  The summary table has more modes, whereas the individual tables have just the interesting ones.<br />
+               <br />
+               In the summary table, entries are sorted by average compression ratio, which is the average of the ratios for each track; this keeps long tracks from having more influence than short ones.  In the individual tables, this is the same as the straight compression ratio, which is compressed size / uncompressed size.<br />
+               <br />
                Some interesting things to note:
                <ul>
                        <li>flac -5 is right in the middle with respect to compression, relatively fast on the encoding range, and one of the fastest decoding.  This is about what you would expect; FLAC is designed to put most of the processing on the encoding side, which is only done once, whereas the adaptive codecs take as long to decode as encode.  FLAC is more suited in this way for playback on low-power devices and is one of the reasons it is the only lossless codec with any kind of hardware support.</li>
                        <li>RKAU also has a tendency to get bigger in the 'high' mode.</li>
                        <li>Another ironic fact is that the encoders that are patented or cost money turn out to be the worst by most measures.  SPS is so archane and crippled that I gave up trying to put together results for it after one track.</li>
                </ul>
-               This is a summary table with just the most 'economic' modes (the ones that give the most compression for the least amount of encode/decode time) for each codec.
-               <br /><br />
+               This is a summary table with just the most 'economic' modes (the ones that give the most compression for the least amount of encode/decode time) for each codec.<br />
+               <br />
 
                <table width="100%" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" bgcolor="#EEEED4"><tr><td>
                <table width="100%" border="1" bgcolor="#EEEED4">
index 5d2b7ab..1734c58 100644 (file)
@@ -53,8 +53,8 @@
        </div>
        <div class="box_header"></div>
        <div class="box_body">
-               FLAC is an open source project and we are happy to enlist the help of anyone who wants to contribute.  The preferred method for transmitting improvements is patch files (in "diff -c" format) sent to the <a href="http://lists.xiph.org/mailman/listinfo/flac-dev">developer mailing list</a>, but zipped up sources are OK.  Make sure to read the <a href="goals.html">FLAC goals</a> first; there are some thing the we <b>don't</b> want added to FLAC, like copy protection and lossy compression.
-               <br /><br />
+               FLAC is an open source project and we are happy to enlist the help of anyone who wants to contribute.  The preferred method for transmitting improvements is patch files (in "diff -c" format) sent to the <a href="http://lists.xiph.org/mailman/listinfo/flac-dev">developer mailing list</a>, but zipped up sources are OK.  Make sure to read the <a href="goals.html">FLAC goals</a> first; there are some thing the we <b>don't</b> want added to FLAC, like copy protection and lossy compression.<br />
+               <br />
                High priority items are:
                <ul>
                        <li>
index 2d022c3..eb7b595 100644 (file)
@@ -77,8 +77,8 @@
        </div>
        <div class="box_header"></div>
        <div class="box_body">
-               <span class="commandname">flac</span> has been tuned so that the default options yield a good speed vs. compression tradeoff for many kinds of input.  However, if you are looking to maximize the compression rate or speed, or want to use the full power of FLAC's metadata system, this section is for you.  If not, just skip to the <a href="#flac">next section</a>.
-               <br /><br />
+               <span class="commandname">flac</span> has been tuned so that the default options yield a good speed vs. compression tradeoff for many kinds of input.  However, if you are looking to maximize the compression rate or speed, or want to use the full power of FLAC's metadata system, this section is for you.  If not, just skip to the <a href="#flac">next section</a>.<br />
+               <br />
                The basic structure of a FLAC stream is:
                <ul>
                        <li>The four byte string "<span class="code">fLaC</span>"</li>
                        <li>Zero or more other metadata blocks</li>
                        <li>One or more audio frames</li>
                </ul>
-               The first four bytes are to identify the FLAC stream.  The metadata that follows contains all the information about the stream except for the audio data itself.  After the metadata comes the encoded audio data.
-               <br /><br />
-               <b>METADATA</b>
-               <br /><br />
-               FLAC defines several types of metadata blocks (see the <a href="format.html">format</a> page for the complete list).  Metadata blocks can be any length and new ones can be defined.  A decoder is allowed to skip any metadata types it does not understand.  Only one is mandatory: the <span class="code">STREAMINFO</span> block.  This block has information like the sample rate, number of channels, etc., and data that can help the decoder manage its buffers, like the minimum and maximum data rate and minimum and maximum block size.  Also included in the <span class="code">STREAMINFO</span> block is the MD5 signature of the <i>unencoded</i> audio data.  This is useful for checking an entire stream for transmission errors.
-               <br /><br />
-               Other blocks allow for padding, seek tables, tags, cuesheets, and application-specific data.  You can see <span class="commandname">flac</span> options below for adding <span class="code">PADDING</span> blocks or specifying seek points.  FLAC does not require seek points for seeking but they can speed up seeks, or be used for cueing in editing applications.
-               <br /><br />
-               Also, if you have a need of a custom metadata block, you can define your own and request an ID <a href="id.html">here</a>.  Then you can reserve a <span class="code">PADDING</span> block of the correct size when encoding, and overwrite the padding block with your <span class="code">APPLICATION</span> block after encoding.  The resulting stream will be FLAC compatible; decoders that are aware of your metadata can use it and the rest will safely ignore it.
-               <br /><br />
-               <b>AUDIO DATA</b>
-               <br /><br />
-               After the metadata comes the encoded audio data.  Audio data and metadata are not interleaved.  Like most audio codecs, FLAC splits the unencoded audio data into blocks, and encodes each block separately.  The encoded block is packed into a frame and appended to the stream.  The reference encoder uses a single block size for the whole stream but the FLAC format does not require it.
-               <br /><br />
-               <b>BLOCKING</b>
-               <br /><br />
-               The block size is an important parameter to encoding.  If it is too small, the frame overhead will lower the compression.  If it is too large, the modeling stage of the compressor will not be able to generate an efficient model.  Understanding FLAC's modeling will help you to improve compression for some kinds of input by varying the block size.  In the most general case, using linear prediction on 44.1kHz audio, the optimal block size will be between 2-6 ksamples.  <span class="commandname">flac</span> defaults to a block size of 4608 in this case.  Using the fast fixed predictors, a smaller block size is usually preferable because of the smaller frame header.
-               <br /><br />
-               <b>INTER-CHANNEL DECORRELATION</b>
-               <br /><br />
-               In the case of stereo input, once the data is blocked it is optionally passed through an inter-channel decorrelation stage.  The left and right channels are converted to center and side channels through the following transformation: mid = (left + right) / 2, side = left - right.  This is a lossless process, unlike joint stereo.  For normal CD audio this can result in significant extra compression.  <span class="commandname">flac</span> has two options for this: <span class="argument">-m</span> always compresses both the left-right and mid-side versions of the block and takes the smallest frame, and <span class="argument">-M</span>, which adaptively switches between left-right and mid-side.
-               <br /><br />
-               <b>MODELING</b>
-               <br /><br />
-               In the next stage, the encoder tries to approximate the signal with a function in such a way that when the approximation is subracted, the result (called the <i>residual</i>, <i>residue</i>, or <i>error</i>) requires fewer bits-per-sample to encode.  The function's parameters also have to be transmitted so they should not be so complex as to eat up the savings.  FLAC has two methods of forming approximations: 1) fitting a simple polynomial to the signal; and 2) general linear predictive coding (LPC).  I will not go into the details here, only some generalities that involve the encoding options.
-               <br /><br />
-               First, fixed polynomial prediction (specified with <span class="argument">-l 0</span>) is much faster, but less accurate than LPC.  The higher the maximum LPC order, the slower, but more accurate, the model will be.  However, there are diminishing returns with increasing orders.  Also, at some point (usually around order 9) the part of the encoder that guesses what is the best order to use will start to get it wrong and the compression will actually decrease slightly; at that point you will have to you will have to use the exhaustive search option <span class="argument">-e</span> to overcome this, which is significantly slower.
-               <br /><br />
-               Second, the parameters for the fixed predictors can be transmitted in 3 bits whereas the parameters for the LPC model depend on the bits-per-sample and LPC order.  This means the frame header length varies depending on the method and order you choose and can affect the optimal block size.
-               <br /><br />
-               <b>RESIDUAL CODING</b>
-               <br /><br />
-               Once the model is generated, the encoder subracts the approximation from the original signal to get the residual (error) signal.  The error signal is then losslessly coded.  To do this, FLAC takes advantage of the fact that the error signal generally has a Laplacian (two-sided geometric) distribution, and that there are a set of special Huffman codes called Rice codes that can be used to efficiently encode these kind of signals quickly and without needing a dictionary.
-               <br /><br />
-               Rice coding involves finding a single parameter that matches a signal's distribution, then using that parameter to generate the codes.  As the distribution changes, the optimal parameter changes, so FLAC supports a method that allows the parameter to change as needed.  The residual can be broken into several <i>contexts</i> or <i>partitions</i>, each with it's own Rice parameter.  <span class="commandname">flac</span> allows you to specify how the partitioning is done with the <span class="argument">-r</span> option.  The residual can be broken into 2^<i>n</i> partitions, by using the option <span class="argument">-r n,n</span>.  The parameter <i>n</i> is called the <i>partition order</i>.  Furthermore, the encoder can be made to search through <i>m</i> to <i>n</i> partition orders, taking the best one, by specifying <span class="argument">-r m,n</span>.  Generally, the choice of n does not affect encoding speed but m,n does.  The larger the difference between m and n, the more time it will take the encoder to search for the best order.  The block size will also affect the optimal order.
-               <br /><br />
-               <b>FRAMING</b>
-               <br /><br />
-               An audio frame is preceded by a frame header and trailed by a frame footer.  The header starts with a sync code, and contains the minimum information necessary for a decoder to play the stream, like sample rate, bits per sample, etc.  It also contains the block or sample number and an 8-bit CRC of the frame header.  The sync code, frame header CRC, and block/sample number allow resynchronization and seeking even in the absence of seek points.  The frame footer contains a 16-bit CRC of the entire encoded frame for error detection.  If the reference decoder detects a CRC error it will generate a silent block.
-               <br /><br />
-               <b>MISCELLANEOUS</b>
-               <br /><br />
-               As a convenience, the reference decoder knows how to skip <a href="http://www.id3.org/">ID3v1 and ID3v2 tags</a>.  Note however that the FLAC specification does not require compliant implementations to support ID3 in any form and their use is discouraged.
-               <br /><br />
+               The first four bytes are to identify the FLAC stream.  The metadata that follows contains all the information about the stream except for the audio data itself.  After the metadata comes the encoded audio data.<br />
+               <br />
+               <b>METADATA</b><br />
+               <br />
+               FLAC defines several types of metadata blocks (see the <a href="format.html">format</a> page for the complete list).  Metadata blocks can be any length and new ones can be defined.  A decoder is allowed to skip any metadata types it does not understand.  Only one is mandatory: the <span class="code">STREAMINFO</span> block.  This block has information like the sample rate, number of channels, etc., and data that can help the decoder manage its buffers, like the minimum and maximum data rate and minimum and maximum block size.  Also included in the <span class="code">STREAMINFO</span> block is the MD5 signature of the <i>unencoded</i> audio data.  This is useful for checking an entire stream for transmission errors.<br />
+               <br />
+               Other blocks allow for padding, seek tables, tags, cuesheets, and application-specific data.  You can see <span class="commandname">flac</span> options below for adding <span class="code">PADDING</span> blocks or specifying seek points.  FLAC does not require seek points for seeking but they can speed up seeks, or be used for cueing in editing applications.<br />
+               <br />
+               Also, if you have a need of a custom metadata block, you can define your own and request an ID <a href="id.html">here</a>.  Then you can reserve a <span class="code">PADDING</span> block of the correct size when encoding, and overwrite the padding block with your <span class="code">APPLICATION</span> block after encoding.  The resulting stream will be FLAC compatible; decoders that are aware of your metadata can use it and the rest will safely ignore it.<br />
+               <br />
+               <b>AUDIO DATA</b><br />
+               <br />
+               After the metadata comes the encoded audio data.  Audio data and metadata are not interleaved.  Like most audio codecs, FLAC splits the unencoded audio data into blocks, and encodes each block separately.  The encoded block is packed into a frame and appended to the stream.  The reference encoder uses a single block size for the whole stream but the FLAC format does not require it.<br />
+               <br />
+               <b>BLOCKING</b><br />
+               <br />
+               The block size is an important parameter to encoding.  If it is too small, the frame overhead will lower the compression.  If it is too large, the modeling stage of the compressor will not be able to generate an efficient model.  Understanding FLAC's modeling will help you to improve compression for some kinds of input by varying the block size.  In the most general case, using linear prediction on 44.1kHz audio, the optimal block size will be between 2-6 ksamples.  <span class="commandname">flac</span> defaults to a block size of 4608 in this case.  Using the fast fixed predictors, a smaller block size is usually preferable because of the smaller frame header.<br />
+               <br />
+               <b>INTER-CHANNEL DECORRELATION</b><br />
+               <br />
+               In the case of stereo input, once the data is blocked it is optionally passed through an inter-channel decorrelation stage.  The left and right channels are converted to center and side channels through the following transformation: mid = (left + right) / 2, side = left - right.  This is a lossless process, unlike joint stereo.  For normal CD audio this can result in significant extra compression.  <span class="commandname">flac</span> has two options for this: <span class="argument">-m</span> always compresses both the left-right and mid-side versions of the block and takes the smallest frame, and <span class="argument">-M</span>, which adaptively switches between left-right and mid-side.<br />
+               <br />
+               <b>MODELING</b><br />
+               <br />
+               In the next stage, the encoder tries to approximate the signal with a function in such a way that when the approximation is subracted, the result (called the <i>residual</i>, <i>residue</i>, or <i>error</i>) requires fewer bits-per-sample to encode.  The function's parameters also have to be transmitted so they should not be so complex as to eat up the savings.  FLAC has two methods of forming approximations: 1) fitting a simple polynomial to the signal; and 2) general linear predictive coding (LPC).  I will not go into the details here, only some generalities that involve the encoding options.<br />
+               <br />
+               First, fixed polynomial prediction (specified with <span class="argument">-l 0</span>) is much faster, but less accurate than LPC.  The higher the maximum LPC order, the slower, but more accurate, the model will be.  However, there are diminishing returns with increasing orders.  Also, at some point (usually around order 9) the part of the encoder that guesses what is the best order to use will start to get it wrong and the compression will actually decrease slightly; at that point you will have to you will have to use the exhaustive search option <span class="argument">-e</span> to overcome this, which is significantly slower.<br />
+               <br />
+               Second, the parameters for the fixed predictors can be transmitted in 3 bits whereas the parameters for the LPC model depend on the bits-per-sample and LPC order.  This means the frame header length varies depending on the method and order you choose and can affect the optimal block size.<br />
+               <br />
+               <b>RESIDUAL CODING</b><br />
+               <br />
+               Once the model is generated, the encoder subracts the approximation from the original signal to get the residual (error) signal.  The error signal is then losslessly coded.  To do this, FLAC takes advantage of the fact that the error signal generally has a Laplacian (two-sided geometric) distribution, and that there are a set of special Huffman codes called Rice codes that can be used to efficiently encode these kind of signals quickly and without needing a dictionary.<br />
+               <br />
+               Rice coding involves finding a single parameter that matches a signal's distribution, then using that parameter to generate the codes.  As the distribution changes, the optimal parameter changes, so FLAC supports a method that allows the parameter to change as needed.  The residual can be broken into several <i>contexts</i> or <i>partitions</i>, each with it's own Rice parameter.  <span class="commandname">flac</span> allows you to specify how the partitioning is done with the <span class="argument">-r</span> option.  The residual can be broken into 2^<i>n</i> partitions, by using the option <span class="argument">-r n,n</span>.  The parameter <i>n</i> is called the <i>partition order</i>.  Furthermore, the encoder can be made to search through <i>m</i> to <i>n</i> partition orders, taking the best one, by specifying <span class="argument">-r m,n</span>.  Generally, the choice of n does not affect encoding speed but m,n does.  The larger the difference between m and n, the more time it will take the encoder to search for the best order.  The block size will also affect the optimal order.<br />
+               <br />
+               <b>FRAMING</b><br />
+               <br />
+               An audio frame is preceded by a frame header and trailed by a frame footer.  The header starts with a sync code, and contains the minimum information necessary for a decoder to play the stream, like sample rate, bits per sample, etc.  It also contains the block or sample number and an 8-bit CRC of the frame header.  The sync code, frame header CRC, and block/sample number allow resynchronization and seeking even in the absence of seek points.  The frame footer contains a 16-bit CRC of the entire encoded frame for error detection.  If the reference decoder detects a CRC error it will generate a silent block.<br />
+               <br />
+               <b>MISCELLANEOUS</b><br />
+               <br />
+               As a convenience, the reference decoder knows how to skip <a href="http://www.id3.org/">ID3v1 and ID3v2 tags</a>.  Note however that the FLAC specification does not require compliant implementations to support ID3 in any form and their use is discouraged.<br />
+               <br />
                <span class="commandname">flac</span> has a verify option <span class="argument">-V</span> that verifies the output while encoding.  With this option, a decoder is run in parallel to the encoder and its output is compared against the original input.  If a difference is found <span class="commandname">flac</span> will stop with an error.
        </div>
        <div class="box_footer"></div>
        </div>
        <div class="box_header"></div>
        <div class="box_body">
-               <span class="commandname">flac</span> is the command-line file encoder/decoder.  The encoder currently supports as input RIFF WAVE, AIFF, FLAC or Ogg FLAC format, or raw interleaved samples.  The decoder currently can output to RIFF WAVE or AIFF format, or raw interleaved samples.  <span class="commandname">flac</span> only supports linear PCM samples (in other words, no A-LAW, uLAW, etc.), and the input must be between 4 and 24 bits per sample.  This is not a limitation of the FLAC format, just the reference encoder/decoder.
-               <br /><br />
-               <span class="commandname">flac</span> assumes that files ending in ".wav" or that have the RIFF WAVE header present are WAVE files, files ending in ".aif" or ".aiff" or have the AIFF header present are AIFF files, and files ending in ".flac" or have the FLAC header present are FLAC files.  This assumption may be overridden with a command-line option.  It also assumes that files ending in ".ogg" of have the Ogg FLAC header present are Ogg FLAC files.  Other than this, <span class="commandname">flac</span> makes no assumptions about file extensions, though the convention is that FLAC files have the extension ".flac" (or ".fla" on ancient "8.3" file systems like FAT-16).
-               <br /><br />
-               Before going into the full command-line description, a few other things help to sort it out: 1) <span class="commandname">flac</span> encodes by default, so you must use <b>-d</b> to decode; 2) the options <span class="argument">-0</span> .. <span class="argument">-8</span> (or <span class="argument">--fast</span> and <span class="argument">--best</span>) that control the compression level actually are just synonyms for different groups of specific encoding options (described later) and you can get the same effect by using the same options; 3) <span class="commandname">flac</span> behaves similarly to gzip in the way it handles input and output files.
-               <br /><br />
+               <span class="commandname">flac</span> is the command-line file encoder/decoder.  The encoder currently supports as input RIFF WAVE, AIFF, FLAC or Ogg FLAC format, or raw interleaved samples.  The decoder currently can output to RIFF WAVE or AIFF format, or raw interleaved samples.  <span class="commandname">flac</span> only supports linear PCM samples (in other words, no A-LAW, uLAW, etc.), and the input must be between 4 and 24 bits per sample.  This is not a limitation of the FLAC format, just the reference encoder/decoder.<br />
+               <br />
+               <span class="commandname">flac</span> assumes that files ending in ".wav" or that have the RIFF WAVE header present are WAVE files, files ending in ".aif" or ".aiff" or have the AIFF header present are AIFF files, and files ending in ".flac" or have the FLAC header present are FLAC files.  This assumption may be overridden with a command-line option.  It also assumes that files ending in ".ogg" of have the Ogg FLAC header present are Ogg FLAC files.  Other than this, <span class="commandname">flac</span> makes no assumptions about file extensions, though the convention is that FLAC files have the extension ".flac" (or ".fla" on ancient "8.3" file systems like FAT-16).<br />
+               <br />
+               Before going into the full command-line description, a few other things help to sort it out: 1) <span class="commandname">flac</span> encodes by default, so you must use <b>-d</b> to decode; 2) the options <span class="argument">-0</span> .. <span class="argument">-8</span> (or <span class="argument">--fast</span> and <span class="argument">--best</span>) that control the compression level actually are just synonyms for different groups of specific encoding options (described later) and you can get the same effect by using the same options; 3) <span class="commandname">flac</span> behaves similarly to gzip in the way it handles input and output files.<br />
+               <br />
                <span class="commandname">flac</span> will be invoked one of four ways, depending on whether you are encoding, decoding, testing, or analyzing:
                <ul>
                        <li>
                                Analyzing: flac -a [<i><a href="#general_options">&lt;general-options&gt;</a></i>] [<i><a href="#analysis_options">&lt;analysis-options&gt;</a></i>] [FLACfile [...]]
                        </li>
                </ul>
-               In any case, if no <span class="argument">inputfile</span> is specified, stdin is assumed.  If only one inputfile is specified, it may be "-" for stdin.  When stdin is used as input, <span class="commandname">flac</span> will write to stdout.  Otherwise <span class="commandname">flac</span> will perform the desired operation on each input file to similarly named output files (meaning for encoding, the extension will be replaced with ".flac", or appended with ".flac" if the input file has no extension, and for decoding, the extension will be ".wav" for WAVE output and ".raw" for raw output).  The original file is not deleted unless --delete-input-file is specified.
-               <br /><br />
+               In any case, if no <span class="argument">inputfile</span> is specified, stdin is assumed.  If only one inputfile is specified, it may be "-" for stdin.  When stdin is used as input, <span class="commandname">flac</span> will write to stdout.  Otherwise <span class="commandname">flac</span> will perform the desired operation on each input file to similarly named output files (meaning for encoding, the extension will be replaced with ".flac", or appended with ".flac" if the input file has no extension, and for decoding, the extension will be ".wav" for WAVE output and ".raw" for raw output).  The original file is not deleted unless --delete-input-file is specified.<br />
+               <br />
                If you are encoding/decoding from stdin to a file, you should use the -o option like so:
                <ul>
                        <li>
                                flac -d [options] &gt; outputfile
                        </li>
                </ul>
-               since the former allows flac to seek backwards to write the <span class="code">STREAMINFO</span> or RIFF WAVE header contents when necessary.
-               <br /><br />
-               Also, you can force output data to go to stdout using <span class="argument">-c</span>.
-               <br /><br />
+               since the former allows flac to seek backwards to write the <span class="code">STREAMINFO</span> or RIFF WAVE header contents when necessary.<br />
+               <br />
+               Also, you can force output data to go to stdout using <span class="argument">-c</span>.<br />
+               <br />
                To encode or decode files that start with a dash, use <span class="argument">--</span> to signal the end of options, to keep the filenames themselves from being treated as options:
                <ul>
                        <li>
                                <span class="code">flac -V -- -01-filename.wav</span>
                        </li>
                </ul>
-               The encoding options affect the compression ratio and encoding speed.  The format options are used to tell <span class="commandname">flac</span> the arrangement of samples if the input file (or output file when decoding) is a raw file.  If it is a RIFF WAVE or AIFF file the format options are not needed since they are read from the AIFF/WAVE header.
-               <br /><br />
-               In test mode, <span class="commandname">flac</span> acts just like in decode mode, except no output file is written.  Both decode and test modes detect errors in the stream, but they also detect when the MD5 signature of the decoded audio does not match the stored MD5 signature, even when the bitstream is valid.
-               <br /><br />
-               <span class="commandname">flac</span> can also re-encode FLAC files.  In other words, you can specify a FLAC or Ogg FLAC file as an input to the encoder and it will decoder it and re-encode it according to the options you specify.  It will also preserve all the metadata unless you override it with other options (e.g. specifying new tags, seekpoints, cuesheet, padding, etc.).
-               <br /><br />
+               The encoding options affect the compression ratio and encoding speed.  The format options are used to tell <span class="commandname">flac</span> the arrangement of samples if the input file (or output file when decoding) is a raw file.  If it is a RIFF WAVE or AIFF file the format options are not needed since they are read from the AIFF/WAVE header.<br />
+               <br />
+               In test mode, <span class="commandname">flac</span> acts just like in decode mode, except no output file is written.  Both decode and test modes detect errors in the stream, but they also detect when the MD5 signature of the decoded audio does not match the stored MD5 signature, even when the bitstream is valid.<br />
+               <br />
+               <span class="commandname">flac</span> can also re-encode FLAC files.  In other words, you can specify a FLAC or Ogg FLAC file as an input to the encoder and it will decoder it and re-encode it according to the options you specify.  It will also preserve all the metadata unless you override it with other options (e.g. specifying new tags, seekpoints, cuesheet, padding, etc.).<br />
+               <br />
 
                <table width="100%" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" bgcolor="#EEEED4"><tr><td>
                <table width="100%" border="1" bgcolor="#EEEED4">
                                        <span class="argument">--skip={#|mm:ss.ss}</span>
                                </td>
                                <td>
-                                       Skip over the first # of samples of the input.  This works for both encoding and decoding, but not testing.  The alternative form <span class="argument">mm:ss.ss</span> can be used to specify minutes, seconds, and fractions of a second.<br /><br />
-                                       Examples:<br /><br />
+                                       Skip over the first # of samples of the input.  This works for both encoding and decoding, but not testing.  The alternative form <span class="argument">mm:ss.ss</span> can be used to specify minutes, seconds, and fractions of a second.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       Examples:<br />
+                                       <br />
                                        <span class="argument">--skip=123</span> : skip the first 123 samples of the input<br />
                                        <span class="argument">--skip=1:23.45</span> : skip the first 1 minute and 23.45 seconds of the input
                                </td>
                                        <span class="argument">--until={#|[+|-]mm:ss.ss}</span>
                                </td>
                                <td>
-                                       Stop at the given sample number for each input file.  This works for both encoding and decoding, but not testing.  The given sample number is not included in the decoded output.  The alternative form <span class="argument">mm:ss.ss</span> can be used to specify minutes, seconds, and fractions of a second.  If a <span class="argument">+</span> sign is at the beginning, the <span class="argument">--until</span> point is relative to the <span class="argument">--skip</span> point.  If a <span class="argument">-</span> sign is at the beginning, the <span class="argument">--until</span> point is relative to end of the audio.<br /><br />
-                                       Examples:<br /><br />
+                                       Stop at the given sample number for each input file.  This works for both encoding and decoding, but not testing.  The given sample number is not included in the decoded output.  The alternative form <span class="argument">mm:ss.ss</span> can be used to specify minutes, seconds, and fractions of a second.  If a <span class="argument">+</span> sign is at the beginning, the <span class="argument">--until</span> point is relative to the <span class="argument">--skip</span> point.  If a <span class="argument">-</span> sign is at the beginning, the <span class="argument">--until</span> point is relative to end of the audio.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       Examples:<br />
+                                       <br />
                                        <span class="argument">--until=123</span> : decode only the first 123 samples of the input (samples 0-122, stopping at 123)<br />
                                        <span class="argument">--until=1:23.45</span> : decode only the first 1 minute and 23.45 seconds of the input<br />
                                        <span class="argument">--skip=1:00 --until=+1:23.45</span> : decode 1:00.00 to 2:23.45<br />
                                        <span class="argument">--ogg</span>
                                </td>
                                <td>
-                                       When encoding, generate Ogg FLAC output instead of native FLAC.  Ogg FLAC streams are FLAC streams wrapped in an Ogg transport layer.  The resulting file should have an '.ogg' extension and will still be decodable by <span class="commandname">flac</span>.<br /><br />
-                                       When decoding, force the input to be treated as Ogg FLAC.  This is useful when piping input from stdin or when the filename does not end in '.ogg'.<br /><br />
+                                       When encoding, generate Ogg FLAC output instead of native FLAC.  Ogg FLAC streams are FLAC streams wrapped in an Ogg transport layer.  The resulting file should have an '.ogg' extension and will still be decodable by <span class="commandname">flac</span>.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       When decoding, force the input to be treated as Ogg FLAC.  This is useful when piping input from stdin or when the filename does not end in '.ogg'.<br />
+                                       <br />
                                        <b>NOTE:</b> Ogg FLAC files created prior to <span class="commandname">flac</span> 1.1.1 used an ad-hoc mapping and do not support seeking.  They should be decoded and re-encoded with <span class="commandname">flac</span> 1.1.1 or later.
                                </td>
                        </tr>
                                        <span class="argument">--cue=[#.#][-[#.#]]</span>
                                </td>
                                <td>
-                                       Set the beginning and ending cuepoints to decode.  The optional first <span class="argument">#.#</span> is the track and index point at which decoding will start; the default is the beginning of the stream.  The optional second <span class="argument">#.#</span> is the track and index point at which decoding will end; the default is the end of the stream.  If the cuepoint does not exist, the closest one before it (for the start point) or after it (for the end point) will be used.  If those don't exist, the start of the stream (for the start point) or end of the stream (for the end point) will be used.  The cuepoints are merely translated into sample numbers then used as --skip and --until.<br /><br />
-                                       Examples:<br /><br />
+                                       Set the beginning and ending cuepoints to decode.  The optional first <span class="argument">#.#</span> is the track and index point at which decoding will start; the default is the beginning of the stream.  The optional second <span class="argument">#.#</span> is the track and index point at which decoding will end; the default is the end of the stream.  If the cuepoint does not exist, the closest one before it (for the start point) or after it (for the end point) will be used.  If those don't exist, the start of the stream (for the start point) or end of the stream (for the end point) will be used.  The cuepoints are merely translated into sample numbers then used as --skip and --until.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       Examples:<br />
+                                       <br />
                                        <span class="argument">--cue=-</span> : decode the entire stream<br />
                                        <span class="argument">--cue=4.1</span> : decode from track 4, index 1 to the end of the stream<br />
                                        <span class="argument">--cue=4.1-</span> : decode from track 4, index 1 to the end of the stream<br />
                                        <span class="argument">-@@@-apply-replaygain-which-is-not-lossless[=&lt;specification&gt;]</span>
                                </td>
                                <td>
-                                       Applies ReplayGain values while decoding.
-                                       <br /><br />
-                                       <b>WARNING: THIS IS NOT LOSSLESS.  DECODED AUDIO WILL NOT BE IDENTICAL TO THE ORIGINAL WITH THIS OPTION</b>.
-                                       <br /><br />
-                                       The equals sign and &lt;specification&gt; is optional.  If omitted, the default is <span class="argument">0aLn1</span>.
-                                       <br /><br />
-                                       The <span class="argument">&lt;specification&gt;</span> is a shorthand notation for describing how to apply ReplayGain.  All components are optional but order is important.  '<span class="argument">[]</span>' means 'optional'.  '<span class="argument">|</span>' means 'or'.  '<span class="argument">{}</span>' means required.  The format is:<br /><br />
+                                       Applies ReplayGain values while decoding.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       <b>WARNING: THIS IS NOT LOSSLESS.  DECODED AUDIO WILL NOT BE IDENTICAL TO THE ORIGINAL WITH THIS OPTION</b>.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       The equals sign and &lt;specification&gt; is optional.  If omitted, the default is <span class="argument">0aLn1</span>.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       The <span class="argument">&lt;specification&gt;</span> is a shorthand notation for describing how to apply ReplayGain.  All components are optional but order is important.  '<span class="argument">[]</span>' means 'optional'.  '<span class="argument">|</span>' means 'or'.  '<span class="argument">{}</span>' means required.  The format is:<br />
+                                       <br />
                                        &nbsp;&nbsp;<span class="argument">[&lt;preamp&gt;][a|t][l|L][n{0|1|2|3}]</span>
                                        <ul>
                                                <li>
                                                                &nbsp;&nbsp;Specify the amount of noise shaping.  ReplayGain synthesis happens in floating point; the result is dithered before converting back to integer.  This quantization adds noise.  Noise shaping tries to move the noise where you won't hear it as much.  <span class="argument">0</span> means no noise shaping, <span class="argument">1</span> means 'low', <span class="argument">2</span> means 'medium', <span class="argument">3</span> means 'high'.
                                                </li>
                                        </ul>
-                                       For example, the default of <span class="argument">0aLn1</span> means 0dB preamp, use album gain, 6dB hard limit, low noise shaping.
-                                       <br /><br />
-                                       <span class="argument">-@@@-apply-replaygain-which-is-not-lossless=3</span> means 3dB preamp, use album gain, no limiting, no noise shaping.
-                                       <br /><br />
+                                       For example, the default of <span class="argument">0aLn1</span> means 0dB preamp, use album gain, 6dB hard limit, low noise shaping.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       <span class="argument">-@@@-apply-replaygain-which-is-not-lossless=3</span> means 3dB preamp, use album gain, no limiting, no noise shaping.<br />
+                                       <br />
                                        <span class="commandname">flac</span> uses the ReplayGain tags for the calculation.  If a stream does not have the required tags or they can't be parsed, decoding will continue with a warning, and no ReplayGain is applied to that stream.
                                </td>
                        </tr>
                                        <span class="argument">--replay-gain</span>
                                </td>
                                <td>
-                                       Calculate <a href="http://www.replaygain.org/">ReplayGain</a> values and store them as FLAC tags, similar to <a href="http://packages.qa.debian.org/v/vorbisgain.html">VorbisGain</a>.  Title gains/peaks will be computed for each input file, and an album gain/peak will be computed for all files.  All input files must have the same resolution, sample rate, and number of channels.  Only mono and stereo files are allowed, and the sample rate must be one of 8, 11.025, 12, 16, 22.05, 24, 32, 44.1, or 48 kHz.  Also note that this option may leave a few extra bytes in a <span class="code">PADDING</span> block as the exact size of the tags is not known until all files are processed.<br /><br />
+                                       Calculate <a href="http://www.replaygain.org/">ReplayGain</a> values and store them as FLAC tags, similar to <a href="http://packages.qa.debian.org/v/vorbisgain.html">VorbisGain</a>.  Title gains/peaks will be computed for each input file, and an album gain/peak will be computed for all files.  All input files must have the same resolution, sample rate, and number of channels.  Only mono and stereo files are allowed, and the sample rate must be one of 8, 11.025, 12, 16, 22.05, 24, 32, 44.1, or 48 kHz.  Also note that this option may leave a few extra bytes in a <span class="code">PADDING</span> block as the exact size of the tags is not known until all files are processed.<br />
+                                       <br />
                                        Note that this option cannot be used when encoding to standard output (stdout).
                                </td>
                        </tr>
                                        <span class="argument">--cuesheet=FILENAME</span>
                                </td>
                                <td>
-                                       Import the given cuesheet file and store it in a <a href="format.html#def_CUESHEET"><span class="code">CUESHEET</span></a> metadata block.  This option may only be used when encoding a single file.  A seekpoint will be added for each index point in the cuesheet to the <a href="format.html#def_SEEKTABLE"><span class="code">SEEKTABLE</span></a> unless <span class="argument">--no-cued-seekpoints</span> is specified.<br /><br />
+                                       Import the given cuesheet file and store it in a <a href="format.html#def_CUESHEET"><span class="code">CUESHEET</span></a> metadata block.  This option may only be used when encoding a single file.  A seekpoint will be added for each index point in the cuesheet to the <a href="format.html#def_SEEKTABLE"><span class="code">SEEKTABLE</span></a> unless <span class="argument">--no-cued-seekpoints</span> is specified.<br />
+                                       <br />
                                        The cuesheet file must be of the sort written by <a href="http://www.goldenhawk.com/cdrwin.htm">CDRwin</a>, <a href="http://www.dcsoft.com/prod03.htm">CDRcue</a>, <a href="http://www.exactaudiocopy.de/">EAC</a>, etc.  See also <a href="http://digitalx.org/cuesheetsyntax.php">cuesheet syntax</a>.
                                </td>
                        </tr>
                                        <span class="argument">--picture=SPECIFICATION</span>
                                </td>
                                <td>
-                                       Import a picture and store it in a <a href="format.html#def_PICTURE"><span class="code">PICTURE</span></a> metadata block.  More than one <span class="argument">--picture</span> command can be specified.  The <span class="argument">SPECIFICATION</span> is a string whose parts are separated by <span class="argument">|</span> (pipe) characters.  Some parts may be left empty to invoke default values.  The format of <span class="argument">SPECIFICATION</span> is<br /><br />
-                                       <tt>&nbsp;&nbsp;[TYPE]|MIME-TYPE|[DESCRIPTION]|[WIDTHxHEIGHTxDEPTH[/COLORS]]|FILE</tt><br /><br />
+                                       Import a picture and store it in a <a href="format.html#def_PICTURE"><span class="code">PICTURE</span></a> metadata block.  More than one <span class="argument">--picture</span> command can be specified.  The <span class="argument">SPECIFICATION</span> is a string whose parts are separated by <span class="argument">|</span> (pipe) characters.  Some parts may be left empty to invoke default values.  The format of <span class="argument">SPECIFICATION</span> is<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       <tt>&nbsp;&nbsp;[TYPE]|MIME-TYPE|[DESCRIPTION]|[WIDTHxHEIGHTxDEPTH[/COLORS]]|FILE</tt><br />
+                                       <br />
                                        <span class="argument">TYPE</span> is optional; it is a number from one of:<br />
                                        <tt><ul>
                                                <li>0: Other</li>
                                                <li>19: Band/artist logotype</li>
                                                <li>20: Publisher/Studio logotype</li>
                                        </ul></tt>
-                                       The default is 3 (front cover).  There may only be one picture each of type 1 and 2 in a file.<br/><br />
-                                       <span class="argument">MIME-TYPE</span> is mandatory; for best compatibility with players, use pictures with MIME type <tt>image/jpeg</tt> or <tt>image/png</tt>.  The MIME type can also be --&gt; to mean that <span class="argument">FILE</span> is actually a URL to an image, though this use is discouraged.<br /><br />
-                                       <span class="argument">DESCRIPTION</span> is optional; the default is an empty string.<br /><br />
-                                       The next part specfies the resolution and color information.  If the <span class="argument">MIME-TYPE</span> is <tt>image/jpeg</tt>, <tt>image/png</tt>, or <tt>image/gif</tt>, you can usually leave this empty and they can be detected from the file.  Otherwise, you must specify the width in pixels, height in pixels, and color depth in bits-per-pixel.  If the image has indexed colors you should also specify the number of colors used.  When manually specified, it is not checked against the file for accuracy.<br /><br />
-                                       <span class="argument">FILE</span> is the path to the picture file to be imported, or the URL if MIME type is --&gt;<br /><br />
-                                       For example, the specification <span class="argument">|image/jpeg|||../cover.jpg</span> will embed the JPEG file at <tt>../cover.jpg</tt>, defaulting to type 3 (front cover) and an empty description.  The resolution and color info will be retrieved from the file itself.<br /><br />
+                                       The default is 3 (front cover).  There may only be one picture each of type 1 and 2 in a file.<br/>
+                                       <br />
+                                       <span class="argument">MIME-TYPE</span> is mandatory; for best compatibility with players, use pictures with MIME type <tt>image/jpeg</tt> or <tt>image/png</tt>.  The MIME type can also be --&gt; to mean that <span class="argument">FILE</span> is actually a URL to an image, though this use is discouraged.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       <span class="argument">DESCRIPTION</span> is optional; the default is an empty string.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       The next part specfies the resolution and color information.  If the <span class="argument">MIME-TYPE</span> is <tt>image/jpeg</tt>, <tt>image/png</tt>, or <tt>image/gif</tt>, you can usually leave this empty and they can be detected from the file.  Otherwise, you must specify the width in pixels, height in pixels, and color depth in bits-per-pixel.  If the image has indexed colors you should also specify the number of colors used.  When manually specified, it is not checked against the file for accuracy.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       <span class="argument">FILE</span> is the path to the picture file to be imported, or the URL if MIME type is --&gt;<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       For example, the specification <span class="argument">|image/jpeg|||../cover.jpg</span> will embed the JPEG file at <tt>../cover.jpg</tt>, defaulting to type 3 (front cover) and an empty description.  The resolution and color info will be retrieved from the file itself.<br />
+                                       <br />
                                        The specification <span class="argument">4|--&gt;|CD|320x300x24/173|http://blah.blah/backcover.tiff</span> will embed the given URL, with type 4 (back cover), description "CD", and a manually specified resolution of 320x300, 24 bits-per-pixel, and 173 colors.  The file at the URL will not be fetched; the URL itself is stored in the PICTURE metadata block.
                                </td>
                        </tr>
                                        <span class="argument">--sector-align</span>
                                </td>
                                <td>
-                                       Align encoding of multiple CD format files on sector boundaries.  This option is only allowed when encoding files all of which have a 44.1kHz sample rate and 2 channels.  With <span class="argument">--sector-align</span>, the encoder will align the resulting .flac streams so that their lengths are even multiples of a CD sector (1/75th of a second, or 588 samples).  It does this by carrying over any partial sector at the end of each file to the next stream.  The last stream will be padded to alignment with zeroes.<br /><br />
-                                       This option will have no effect if the files are already aligned (as is the normally the case with WAVE files ripped from a CD).  <span class="commandname">flac</span> can only align a set of files given in one invocation of <span class="commandname">flac</span>.<br /><br />
+                                       Align encoding of multiple CD format files on sector boundaries.  This option is only allowed when encoding files all of which have a 44.1kHz sample rate and 2 channels.  With <span class="argument">--sector-align</span>, the encoder will align the resulting .flac streams so that their lengths are even multiples of a CD sector (1/75th of a second, or 588 samples).  It does this by carrying over any partial sector at the end of each file to the next stream.  The last stream will be padded to alignment with zeroes.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       This option will have no effect if the files are already aligned (as is the normally the case with WAVE files ripped from a CD).  <span class="commandname">flac</span> can only align a set of files given in one invocation of <span class="commandname">flac</span>.<br />
+                                       <br />
                                        <b>WARNING:</b> The ordering of files is important!  If you give a command like '<span class="code">flac --sector-align *.wav</span>' the shell may not expand the wildcard to the order you expect.  To be safe you should '<span class="code">echo *.wav</span>' first to confirm the order, or be explicit like '<span class="code">flac --sector-align 8.wav 9.wav 10.wav</span>'.
                                </td>
                        </tr>
                                        <span class="argument">-r [#,]#</span>,<br /><span class="argument">--rice-partition-order=[#,]#</span>
                                </td>
                                <td>
-                                       Set the [min,]max residual partition order.  The min value defaults to 0 if unspecified.<br /><br />
+                                       Set the [min,]max residual partition order.  The min value defaults to 0 if unspecified.<br />
+                                       <br />
                                        By default the encoder uses a single Rice parameter for the subframe's entire residual.  With this option, the residual is iteratively partitioned into 2^min# .. 2^max# pieces, each with its own Rice parameter.  Higher values of max# yield diminishing returns.  The most bang for the buck is usually with <span class="argument">-r 2,2</span> (more for higher block sizes).  This usually shaves off about 1.5%.  The technique tends to peak out about when blocksize/(2^n)=128.  Use <span class="argument">-r 0,16</span> to force the highest degree of optimization.
                                </td>
                        </tr>
        </div>
        <div class="box_header"></div>
        <div class="box_body">
-               <span class="commandname">metaflac</span> is the command-line <span class="code">.flac</span> file metadata editor.  You can use it to list the contents of metadata blocks, edit, delete or insert blocks, and manage padding.
-               <br /><br />
+               <span class="commandname">metaflac</span> is the command-line <span class="code">.flac</span> file metadata editor.  You can use it to list the contents of metadata blocks, edit, delete or insert blocks, and manage padding.<br />
+               <br />
                <span class="commandname">metaflac</span> takes a set of "options" (though some are not optional) and a set of FLAC files to operate on.  There are three kinds of "options":
                <ul>
                        <li>
                                Global options, which affect all the operations.
                        </li>
                </ul>
-               All of these are described in the tables below.  At least one shorthand or major operation must be supplied.  You can use multiple shorthand operations to do more than one thing to a file or set of files.  Most of the common things to do to metadata have shorthand operations.  As an example, here is how to show the MD5 signatures for a set of three FLAC files:
-               <br /><br />
-                       <span class="code">metaflac --show-md5sum file1.flac file2.flac file3.flac</span>
-               <br /><br />
-                       Another example; this removes all DESCRIPTION and COMMENT tags in a set of FLAC files, and uses the <span class="argument">--preserve-modtime</span> global option to keep the FLAC file modification times the same (usually when files are edited the modification time is set to the current time):
-               <br /><br />
-                       <span class="code">metaflac --preserve-modtime --remove-tag=DESCRIPTION --remove-tag=COMMENT file1.flac file2.flac file3.flac</span>
-               <br /><br />
+               All of these are described in the tables below.  At least one shorthand or major operation must be supplied.  You can use multiple shorthand operations to do more than one thing to a file or set of files.  Most of the common things to do to metadata have shorthand operations.  As an example, here is how to show the MD5 signatures for a set of three FLAC files:<br />
+               <br />
+               <span class="code">metaflac --show-md5sum file1.flac file2.flac file3.flac</span><br />
+               <br />
+               Another example; this removes all DESCRIPTION and COMMENT tags in a set of FLAC files, and uses the <span class="argument">--preserve-modtime</span> global option to keep the FLAC file modification times the same (usually when files are edited the modification time is set to the current time):<br />
+               <br />
+               <span class="code">metaflac --preserve-modtime --remove-tag=DESCRIPTION --remove-tag=COMMENT file1.flac file2.flac file3.flac</span><br />
+               <br />
 
                <table width="100%" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" bgcolor="#EEEED4"><tr><td>
                <table width="100%" border="1" bgcolor="#EEEED4">
                                        <span class="argument">--list</span>
                                </td>
                                <td>
-                                       List the contents of one or more metadata blocks to stdout.  By default, all metadata blocks are listed in text format.  Use the following options to change this behavior:<br /><br />
+                                       List the contents of one or more metadata blocks to stdout.  By default, all metadata blocks are listed in text format.  Use the following options to change this behavior:<br />
+                                       <br />
 
                                        <span class="argument">--block-number=#[,#[...]]</span><br />
-                                       An optional comma-separated list of block numbers to display.  The first block, the <span class="code">STREAMINFO</span> block, is block 0.<br /><br />
+                                       An optional comma-separated list of block numbers to display.  The first block, the <span class="code">STREAMINFO</span> block, is block 0.<br />
+                                       <br />
 
                                        <span class="argument">--block-type=type[,type[...]]</span><br />
                                        <span class="argument">--except-block-type=type[,type[...]]</span><br />
                                        </table>
                                        <br />
 
-                                       NOTE: if both <span class="argument">--block-number</span> and <span class="argument">--[except-]block-type</span> are specified, the result is the logical AND of both arguments.<br /><br />
+                                       NOTE: if both <span class="argument">--block-number</span> and <span class="argument">--[except-]block-type</span> are specified, the result is the logical AND of both arguments.<br />
+                                       <br />
 
                                        <span class="argument">--application-data-format=hexdump|text</span><br />
                                        If the application block you are displaying contains binary data but your <span class="argument">--data-format=text</span>, you can display a hex dump of the application data contents instead using <span class="argument">--application-data-format=hexdump</span>.
                                        <span class="argument">--remove</span>
                                </td>
                                <td>
-                                       Remove one or more metadata blocks from the metadata.  Unless <span class="argument">--dont-use-padding</span> is specified, the blocks will be replaced with padding.  You may not remove the <span class="code">STREAMINFO</span> block.<br /><br />
+                                       Remove one or more metadata blocks from the metadata.  Unless <span class="argument">--dont-use-padding</span> is specified, the blocks will be replaced with padding.  You may not remove the <span class="code">STREAMINFO</span> block.<br />
+                                       <br />
 
                                        <span class="argument">--block-number=#[,#[...]]</span><br />
                                        <span class="argument">--block-type=type[,type[...]]</span><br />
                                        <span class="argument">--except-block-type=type[,type[...]]</span><br />
-                                       See <a href="#metaflac_operations_list"><span class="argument">--list</span></a> above for usage.<br /><br />
+                                       See <a href="#metaflac_operations_list"><span class="argument">--list</span></a> above for usage.<br />
+                                       <br />
 
                                        NOTE: if both <span class="argument">--block-number</span> and <span class="argument">--[except-]block-type</span> are specified, the result is the logical AND of both arguments.
                                </td>
        </div>
        <div class="box_header"></div>
        <div class="box_body">
-               Bug tracking is done on the Sourceforge project page <a href="http://sourceforge.net/bugs/?group_id=13478">here</a>.  If you submit a bug, make sure and provide an email contact or use the Monitor feature.
-               <br /><br />
+               Bug tracking is done on the Sourceforge project page <a href="http://sourceforge.net/bugs/?group_id=13478">here</a>.  If you submit a bug, make sure and provide an email contact or use the Monitor feature.<br />
+               <br />
                The following are major known bugs in the current (1.1.3) release:
                <ul>
                        <li>
index 672eb52..b9d3eba 100644 (file)
        </div>
        <div class="box_header"></div>
        <div class="box_body">
-               <b>NOTE: </b> these extras are not part of the FLAC project.  Most (except those marked [$]) are freely available but distributed under their authors' own terms.
-               <br /><br />
-               <b>NOTE: </b> make sure to check out the <a href="links.html">links page</a> for a large list of open-source software supporting FLAC.
-               <br /><br />
+               <b>NOTE: </b> these extras are not part of the FLAC project.  Most (except those marked [$]) are freely available but distributed under their authors' own terms.<br />
+               <br />
+               <b>NOTE: </b> make sure to check out the <a href="links.html">links page</a> for a large list of open-source software supporting FLAC.<br />
+               <br />
                <b>GUI encoding/decoding front-ends:</b>
                <ul>
                        <li>
index 26659e3..9853114 100644 (file)
                                </ul>
                        </li>
                </ul>
-               <a name="acknowledgments"><font size="+1"><b><u>Acknowledgments</u></b></font></a>
-               <br /><br />
+               <a name="acknowledgments"><font size="+1"><b><u>Acknowledgments</u></b></font></a><br />
+               <br />
                FLAC owes much to the many people who have advanced the audio compression field so freely.  For instance:
                <ul>
                        <li>
                                And of course, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_Shannon">Claude Shannon</a>
                        </li>
                </ul>
-               <a name="scope"><font size="+1"><b><u>Scope</u></b></font></a>
-               <br /><br />
-               It is a known fact that no algorithm can losslessly compress all possible input, so most compressors restrict themselves to a useful domain and try to work as well as possible within that domain.  FLAC's domain is audio data.  Though it can losslessly <b>code</b> any input, only certain kinds of input will get smaller.  FLAC exploits the fact that audio data typically has a high degree of sample-to-sample correlation.
-               <br /><br />
-               Within the audio domain, there are many possible subdomains.  For example: low bitrate speech, high-bitrate multi-channel music, etc.  FLAC itself does not target a specific subdomain but many of the default parameters of the reference encoder are tuned to CD-quality music data (i.e. 44.1kHz, 2 channel, 16 bits per sample).  The effect of the encoding parameters on different kinds of audio data will be examined later.
-               <br /><br />
-               <a name="architecture"><font size="+1"><b><u>Architecture</u></b></font></a>
-               <br /><br />
+               <a name="scope"><font size="+1"><b><u>Scope</u></b></font></a><br />
+               <br />
+               It is a known fact that no algorithm can losslessly compress all possible input, so most compressors restrict themselves to a useful domain and try to work as well as possible within that domain.  FLAC's domain is audio data.  Though it can losslessly <b>code</b> any input, only certain kinds of input will get smaller.  FLAC exploits the fact that audio data typically has a high degree of sample-to-sample correlation.<br />
+               <br />
+               Within the audio domain, there are many possible subdomains.  For example: low bitrate speech, high-bitrate multi-channel music, etc.  FLAC itself does not target a specific subdomain but many of the default parameters of the reference encoder are tuned to CD-quality music data (i.e. 44.1kHz, 2 channel, 16 bits per sample).  The effect of the encoding parameters on different kinds of audio data will be examined later.<br />
+               <br />
+               <a name="architecture"><font size="+1"><b><u>Architecture</u></b></font></a><br />
+               <br />
                Similar to many audio coders, a FLAC encoder has the following stages:
                <ul>
                        <li>
                                <a href="#residualcoding">Residual coding</a>.  If the predictor does not describe the signal exactly, the difference between the original signal and the predicted signal (called the error or residual signal) must be coded losslessy.  If the predictor is effective, the residual signal will require fewer bits per sample than the original signal.  FLAC currently uses only one method for encoding the residual (see the <a href="#residualcoding">Residual coding</a> section), but the format has reserved space for additional methods.  FLAC allows the residual coding method to change from block to block, or even within the channels of a block.
                        </li>
                </ul>
-               In addition, FLAC specifies a metadata system, which allows arbitrary information about the stream to be included at the beginning of the stream.
-               <br /><br />
-               <a name="definitions"><font size="+1"><b><u>Definitions</u></b></font></a>
-               <br /><br />
+               In addition, FLAC specifies a metadata system, which allows arbitrary information about the stream to be included at the beginning of the stream.<br />
+               <br />
+               <a name="definitions"><font size="+1"><b><u>Definitions</u></b></font></a><br />
+               <br />
                Many terms like "block" and "frame" are used to mean different things in differenct encoding schemes.  For example, a frame in MP3 corresponds to many samples across several channels, whereas an S/PDIF frame represents just one sample for each channel.  The definitions we use for FLAC follow.  Note that when we talk about blocks and subblocks we are refering to the raw unencoded audio data that is the input to the encoder, and when we talk about frames and subframes, we are refering to the FLAC-encoded data.
                <ul>
                        <li>
                                <b>Subframe</b>: A subframe header plus one or more encoded samples from a given channel.  All subframes within a frame will contain the same number of samples.
                        </li>
                </ul>
-               <a name="blocking"><font size="+1"><b><u>Blocking</u></b></font></a>
-               <br /><br />
-               The size used for blocking the audio data has a direct effect on the compression ratio.  If the block size is too small, the resulting large number of frames mean that excess bits will be wasted on frame headers.  If the block size is too large, the characteristics of the signal may vary so much that the encoder will be unable to find a good predictor.  In order to simplify encoder/decoder design, FLAC imposes a minimum block size of 16 samples, and a maximum block size of 65535 samples.  This range covers the optimal size for all of the audio data FLAC supports.
-               <br /><br />
-               Currently the reference encoder uses a fixed block size, optimized on the sample rate of the input.  Future versions may vary the block size depending on the characteristics of the signal.
-               <br /><br />
-               Blocked data is passed to the predictor stage one subblock (channel) at a time.  Each subblock is independently coded into a subframe, and the subframes are concatenated into a frame.  Because each channel is coded separately, it means that one channel of a stereo frame may be encoded as a constant subframe, and the other an LPC subframe.
-               <br /><br />
-               <a name="interchannel"><font size="+1"><b><u>Interchannel Decorrelation</u></b></font></a>
-               <br /><br />
+               <a name="blocking"><font size="+1"><b><u>Blocking</u></b></font></a><br />
+               <br />
+               The size used for blocking the audio data has a direct effect on the compression ratio.  If the block size is too small, the resulting large number of frames mean that excess bits will be wasted on frame headers.  If the block size is too large, the characteristics of the signal may vary so much that the encoder will be unable to find a good predictor.  In order to simplify encoder/decoder design, FLAC imposes a minimum block size of 16 samples, and a maximum block size of 65535 samples.  This range covers the optimal size for all of the audio data FLAC supports.<br />
+               <br />
+               Currently the reference encoder uses a fixed block size, optimized on the sample rate of the input.  Future versions may vary the block size depending on the characteristics of the signal.<br />
+               <br />
+               Blocked data is passed to the predictor stage one subblock (channel) at a time.  Each subblock is independently coded into a subframe, and the subframes are concatenated into a frame.  Because each channel is coded separately, it means that one channel of a stereo frame may be encoded as a constant subframe, and the other an LPC subframe.<br />
+               <br />
+               <a name="interchannel"><font size="+1"><b><u>Interchannel Decorrelation</u></b></font></a><br />
+               <br />
                In stereo streams, in many cases there is an exploitable amount of correlation between the left and right channels.  FLAC allows the frames of stereo streams to have different channel assignments, and an encoder may choose to use the best representation on a frame-by-frame basis.
                <ul>
                        <li>
                                <b>Right-side</b>.  The right channel and side channel are coded
                        </li>
                </ul>
-               Surprisingly, the left-side and right-side forms can be the most efficient in many frames, even though the raw number of bits per sample needed for the original signal is slightly more than that needed for independent or mid-side coding.
-               <br /><br />
-               <a name="prediction"><font size="+1"><b><u>Prediction</u></b></font></a>
-               <br /><br />
+               Surprisingly, the left-side and right-side forms can be the most efficient in many frames, even though the raw number of bits per sample needed for the original signal is slightly more than that needed for independent or mid-side coding.<br />
+               <br />
+               <a name="prediction"><font size="+1"><b><u>Prediction</u></b></font></a><br />
+               <br />
                FLAC uses four methods for modeling the input signal:
                <ul>
                        <li>
                                <b>FIR Linear prediction</b>.  For more accurate modeling (at a cost of slower encoding), FLAC supports up to 32nd order FIR linear prediction (again, for info on linear prediction, see <a href="http://www.hpl.hp.com/techreports/1999/HPL-1999-144.pdf">audiopak</a> and <a href="http://svr-www.eng.cam.ac.uk/~ajr/GroupPubs/Robinson94-tr156/index.html">shorten</a>).  The reference encoder uses the Levinson-Durbin method for calculating the LPC coefficients from the autocorrelation coefficients, and the coefficients are quantized before computing the residual.  Whereas encoders such as Shorten used a fixed quantization for the entire input, FLAC allows the quantized coefficient precision to vary from subframe to subframe.  The FLAC reference encoder estimates the optimal precision to use based on the block size and dynamic range of the original signal.
                        </li>
                </ul>
-               <a name="residualcoding"><font size="+1"><b><u>Residual Coding</u></b></font></a>
-               <br /><br />
-               FLAC currently defines two similar methods for the coding of the error signal from the prediction stage.  The error signal is coded using Rice codes in one of two ways: 1) the encoder estimates a single rice parameter based on the variance of the residual and Rice codes the entire residual using this parameter; 2) the residual is partitioned into several equal-length regions of contiguous samples, and each region is coded with its own Rice parameter based on the region's mean.  (Note that the first method is a special case of the second method with one partition, except the Rice parameter is based on the residual variance instead of the mean.)
-               <br /><br />
-               The FLAC format has reserved space for other coding methods.  Some possiblities for volunteers would be to explore better context-modeling of the Rice parameter, or Huffman coding.  See <a href="http://www.hpl.hp.com/techreports/98/HPL-98-193.html">LOCO-I</a> and <a href="http://www.cs.tut.fi/~albert/Dev/pucrunch/packing.html">pucrunch</a> for descriptions of several universal codes.
-               <br /><br />
-               <a name="format_overview"><font size="+1"><b><u>Format</u></b></font></a>
-               <br /><br />
-               This section specifies the FLAC bitstream format.  FLAC has no format version information, but it does contain reserved space in several places.  Future versions of the format may use this reserved space safely without breaking the format of older streams.  Older decoders may choose to abort decoding or skip data encoded with newer methods.  Apart from reserved patterns, in places the format specifies invalid patterns, meaning that the patterns may never appear in any valid bitstream, in any prior, present, or future versions of the format.  These invalid patterns are usually used to make the synchronization mechanism more robust.
-               <br /><br />
-               All numbers used in a FLAC bitstream are integers; there are no floating-point representations.  All numbers are big-endian coded.  All numbers are unsigned unless otherwise specified.
-               <br /><br />
+               <a name="residualcoding"><font size="+1"><b><u>Residual Coding</u></b></font></a><br />
+               <br />
+               FLAC currently defines two similar methods for the coding of the error signal from the prediction stage.  The error signal is coded using Rice codes in one of two ways: 1) the encoder estimates a single rice parameter based on the variance of the residual and Rice codes the entire residual using this parameter; 2) the residual is partitioned into several equal-length regions of contiguous samples, and each region is coded with its own Rice parameter based on the region's mean.  (Note that the first method is a special case of the second method with one partition, except the Rice parameter is based on the residual variance instead of the mean.)<br />
+               <br />
+               The FLAC format has reserved space for other coding methods.  Some possiblities for volunteers would be to explore better context-modeling of the Rice parameter, or Huffman coding.  See <a href="http://www.hpl.hp.com/techreports/98/HPL-98-193.html">LOCO-I</a> and <a href="http://www.cs.tut.fi/~albert/Dev/pucrunch/packing.html">pucrunch</a> for descriptions of several universal codes.<br />
+               <br />
+               <a name="format_overview"><font size="+1"><b><u>Format</u></b></font></a><br />
+               <br />
+               This section specifies the FLAC bitstream format.  FLAC has no format version information, but it does contain reserved space in several places.  Future versions of the format may use this reserved space safely without breaking the format of older streams.  Older decoders may choose to abort decoding or skip data encoded with newer methods.  Apart from reserved patterns, in places the format specifies invalid patterns, meaning that the patterns may never appear in any valid bitstream, in any prior, present, or future versions of the format.  These invalid patterns are usually used to make the synchronization mechanism more robust.<br />
+               <br />
+               All numbers used in a FLAC bitstream are integers; there are no floating-point representations.  All numbers are big-endian coded.  All numbers are unsigned unless otherwise specified.<br />
+               <br />
                Before the formal description of the stream, an overview might be helpful.
                <ul>
                        <li>
index 4938623..646ea1c 100644 (file)
                                </div>
                                <div class="box_header"></div>
                                <div class="box_body">
-                                       <a href="http://winamp.com/player/">Winamp 5.31</a> now includes Nullsoft FLAC plugins for encoding and decoding.  The decoder is based on our reference decoder plugin.  However the current encoder plugin is based on a pre-release of <a href="http://flake-enc.sourceforge.net/">flake</a> and we <a href="http://www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums/index.php?s=&showtopic=45013&view=findpost&p=443961">recommend to not use it for archival</a> yet.
-                                       <br /><br />
-                                       The new <a href="http://www.neodigits.com/new/body/products/Xline/x5000.asp">Helios X5000</a> HD network media player from Neodigits supports FLAC</a>.
-                                       <br /><br />
-                                       The <a href="http://www.thephiladelphiaorchestra.com/">Philadelphia Orchestra</a> is making many recordings <a href="http://www.losslessaudioblog.com/?p=109">available in FLAC</a>.
-                                       <br /><br />
-                                       A whole new batch of devices and stores support FLAC: for portables there are the <a href="http://www.cowonamerica.com/products/iaudio/t2/">iAUDIO T2</a> and <a href="http://www.cowonglobal.com/product/product_F2_feature.php">iAUDIO F2</a>, TrekStor's <a href="http://www.trekstor.de/en/products/detail_mp3.php?pid=66">Vibez</a>, the <a href="http://www.anythingbutipod.com/archives/2006/09/onda-vx737-gaming-pmp.php">Onda VX737</a>, and the <a href="http://www.apod.com.cn/show_products.asp?photoID=437">AP3000</a> from Green Apple.  For the home stereo, Slim Devices' <a href="http://www.slimdevices.com/pi_transporter.html">Transporter</a> and Ziova's <a href="http://www.ziova.com/cs510.php">CS510</a> and <a href="http://www.ziova.com/cs505.php">CS505</a>.  For music in FLAC format check out <a href="http://www.digital-tunes.net/">digital-tunes</a> for electronic and underground, or <a href="http://festivalink.net/">FestivaLink.net</a> for live shows.
-                                       <br /><br />
-                                       Bluedot's <a href="http://www.digitalworldtokyo.com/2006/07/bluedot_pmp_runs_linux_loves.php">BMP-1430</a> portable supports FLAC.
-                                       <br /><br />
-                                       AudioReQuest's new <a href="http://www.request.com/products/sseries.asp">S.Series</a> music servers support FLAC.
-                                       <br /><br />
-                                       Cowon's <a href="http://www.cowonamerica.com/products/cowon/a2/tech_specs.html">A2</a> now supports FLAC with the <a href="http://www.cowonamerica.com/download/cowon_rn_a2.html">latest firmware</a>, and Olive's new <a href="http://www.olive.us/p_bin/?cid=01_07_opus">Opus</a> both plays and records to FLAC.
-                                       <br /><br />
-                                       The new <a href="http://gaming.engadget.com/2006/01/22/iwod-g10-pmp-with-nes-emulator/">Iwod G10</a> portable supports FLAC.
-                                       <br /><br />
-                                       Want some FLAC with your Volvo?  Volvo's <a href="http://www.volvocars.com/DigitalJukebox/product_information/">Digital Jukebox</a>, developed with <a href="http://www.phatnoise.com/">PhatNoise</a>, is fully integrated with the car's audio system and available for the S60, V70, XC70, and S80.  PhatNoise's PhatBox in 2002 was the <a href="news.html#20020213">first device</a> to support FLAC natively and has gained a loyal following.
-                                       <br /><br />
+                                       <a href="http://winamp.com/player/">Winamp 5.31</a> now includes Nullsoft FLAC plugins for encoding and decoding.  The decoder is based on our reference decoder plugin.  However the current encoder plugin is based on a pre-release of <a href="http://flake-enc.sourceforge.net/">flake</a> and we <a href="http://www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums/index.php?s=&showtopic=45013&view=findpost&p=443961">recommend to not use it for archival</a> yet.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       The new <a href="http://www.neodigits.com/new/body/products/Xline/x5000.asp">Helios X5000</a> HD network media player from Neodigits supports FLAC</a>.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       The <a href="http://www.thephiladelphiaorchestra.com/">Philadelphia Orchestra</a> is making many recordings <a href="http://www.losslessaudioblog.com/?p=109">available in FLAC</a>.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       A whole new batch of devices and stores support FLAC: for portables there are the <a href="http://www.cowonamerica.com/products/iaudio/t2/">iAUDIO T2</a> and <a href="http://www.cowonglobal.com/product/product_F2_feature.php">iAUDIO F2</a>, TrekStor's <a href="http://www.trekstor.de/en/products/detail_mp3.php?pid=66">Vibez</a>, the <a href="http://www.anythingbutipod.com/archives/2006/09/onda-vx737-gaming-pmp.php">Onda VX737</a>, and the <a href="http://www.apod.com.cn/show_products.asp?photoID=437">AP3000</a> from Green Apple.  For the home stereo, Slim Devices' <a href="http://www.slimdevices.com/pi_transporter.html">Transporter</a> and Ziova's <a href="http://www.ziova.com/cs510.php">CS510</a> and <a href="http://www.ziova.com/cs505.php">CS505</a>.  For music in FLAC format check out <a href="http://www.digital-tunes.net/">digital-tunes</a> for electronic and underground, or <a href="http://festivalink.net/">FestivaLink.net</a> for live shows.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       Bluedot's <a href="http://www.digitalworldtokyo.com/2006/07/bluedot_pmp_runs_linux_loves.php">BMP-1430</a> portable supports FLAC.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       AudioReQuest's new <a href="http://www.request.com/products/sseries.asp">S.Series</a> music servers support FLAC.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       Cowon's <a href="http://www.cowonamerica.com/products/cowon/a2/tech_specs.html">A2</a> now supports FLAC with the <a href="http://www.cowonamerica.com/download/cowon_rn_a2.html">latest firmware</a>, and Olive's new <a href="http://www.olive.us/p_bin/?cid=01_07_opus">Opus</a> both plays and records to FLAC.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       The new <a href="http://gaming.engadget.com/2006/01/22/iwod-g10-pmp-with-nes-emulator/">Iwod G10</a> portable supports FLAC.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       Want some FLAC with your Volvo?  Volvo's <a href="http://www.volvocars.com/DigitalJukebox/product_information/">Digital Jukebox</a>, developed with <a href="http://www.phatnoise.com/">PhatNoise</a>, is fully integrated with the car's audio system and available for the S60, V70, XC70, and S80.  PhatNoise's PhatBox in 2002 was the <a href="news.html#20020213">first device</a> to support FLAC natively and has gained a loyal following.<br />
+                                       <br />
 <!--
-                                       FLAC 1.1.2 is available.  New in this release are small decoding speedups for all platforms, small encoding speedups in fast (non-LPC) mode, streaming support in the XMMS plugin, and several bug fixes.  For developers there are also a few additions and changes to the metadata API to make working with tags easier.  See the <a href="changelog.html#flac_1_1_2">changelog entry</a> for complete details.  This release actually wasn't supposed to happen so soon, but needed to be made to fix library naming and build problems in FLAC 1.1.1 that caused trouble for package maintainers, so unless you are having trouble with one of the particular bugs that got fixed in 1.1.2 then there is not much of a need to upgrade.
-                                       <br /><br />
+                                       FLAC 1.1.2 is available.  New in this release are small decoding speedups for all platforms, small encoding speedups in fast (non-LPC) mode, streaming support in the XMMS plugin, and several bug fixes.  For developers there are also a few additions and changes to the metadata API to make working with tags easier.  See the <a href="changelog.html#flac_1_1_2">changelog entry</a> for complete details.  This release actually wasn't supposed to happen so soon, but needed to be made to fix library naming and build problems in FLAC 1.1.1 that caused trouble for package maintainers, so unless you are having trouble with one of the particular bugs that got fixed in 1.1.2 then there is not much of a need to upgrade.<br />
+                                       <br />
 -->
                                        <i>last updated 2006-Oct-25</i> <!-- @@@ update date after changes -->
                                </div>
                                </div>
                                <div class="box_header"></div>
                                <div class="box_body">
-                                       FLAC stands for Free Lossless Audio Codec.  Grossly oversimplified, FLAC is similar to MP3, but lossless, meaning that audio is compressed in FLAC without any loss in quality.  This is similar to how Zip works, except with FLAC you will get much better compression because it is designed specifically for audio, and you can play back compressed FLAC files in your favorite player (or your car or home stereo, see <a href="links.html#hardware">supported devices</a>) just like you would an MP3 file.
-                                       <br /><br />
-                                       FLAC is freely available and supported on most operating systems, including Windows, "unix" (Linux, *BSD, Solaris, OS X, IRIX), BeOS, OS/2, and Amiga.  There are build systems for autotools, MSVC, Watcom C, and Project Builder.
-                                       <br /><br />
-                                       See the <a href="features.html">features page</a> for a complete list of features, or the <a href="comparison.html">comparison page</a> to see how FLAC compares with other lossless codecs.
-                                       <br /><br />
-                                       The FLAC project consists of:
-                                       <br /><br />
+                                       FLAC stands for Free Lossless Audio Codec.  Grossly oversimplified, FLAC is similar to MP3, but lossless, meaning that audio is compressed in FLAC without any loss in quality.  This is similar to how Zip works, except with FLAC you will get much better compression because it is designed specifically for audio, and you can play back compressed FLAC files in your favorite player (or your car or home stereo, see <a href="links.html#hardware">supported devices</a>) just like you would an MP3 file.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       FLAC is freely available and supported on most operating systems, including Windows, "unix" (Linux, *BSD, Solaris, OS X, IRIX), BeOS, OS/2, and Amiga.  There are build systems for autotools, MSVC, Watcom C, and Project Builder.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       See the <a href="features.html">features page</a> for a complete list of features, or the <a href="comparison.html">comparison page</a> to see how FLAC compares with other lossless codecs.<br />
+                                       <br />
+                                       The FLAC project consists of:<br />
+                                       <br />
                                        <ul>
                                                <li>the stream format</li>
                                                <li>reference encoders and decoders in library form</li>
                                                <li><span class="commandname">flac</span>, a command-line program to encode and decode FLAC files</li>
                                                <li><span class="commandname">metaflac</span>, a command-line metadata editor for FLAC files</li>
                                                <li>input plugins for various music players</li>
-                                       </ul>
-                                       <br /><br />
+                                       </ul><br />
+                                       <br />
                                        When we say that FLAC is "Free" it means more than just that it is available at no cost.  It means that the specification of the format is fully open to the public to be used for any purpose (the FLAC project reserves the right to set the FLAC specification and certify compliance), and that neither the FLAC format nor any of the implemented encoding/decoding methods are covered by any known patent.  It also means that all the source code is available under open-source licenses.  It is the first truly open and free lossless audio format.  (For more information, see the <a href="license.html">license page</a>.)
                                </div>
                                <div class="box_footer"></div>
index 1de241b..622ba50 100644 (file)
                        <li><a href="http://www.digitalnetworksna.com/shop/_templates/item_main_Rio.asp?model=220&amp;cat=53">Rio Karma</a><!-- and Rio Chroma--></li>
                        <li>TrekStor's <a href="http://www.trekstor.de/en/products/detail_mp3.php?pid=66">Vibez</a></li>
                </ul>
-               <a name="review"><b>Reviews:</b></a>
-               <br /><br />
-               The main purpose of these reviews is to give an idea of how well particular devices support FLAC.  Other subjective comments here are based on our general impressions and are not meant to be thorough or authoritative.  We only review devices we have tested directly ourselves.
-               <br /><br />
-               <a name="review_rio_receiver"><a href="http://www.mock.com/receiver/"><b>Rio Reciever</b></a></a>: This little device is a hacker's dream.  It plays audio over a network (Ethernet or HPNA) so it requires a PC to serve audio files.  There are several open source clients available and since it boots its Linux distro over NFS you can write your own client.  They're not made anymore but you can still find them on ebay.  The main downsides: 1) small, hard-to-read LCD display; 2) FLAC support is only in third-party clients which take some work to set up.
-               <br /><br />
+               <a name="review"><b>Reviews:</b></a><br />
+               <br />
+               The main purpose of these reviews is to give an idea of how well particular devices support FLAC.  Other subjective comments here are based on our general impressions and are not meant to be thorough or authoritative.  We only review devices we have tested directly ourselves.<br />
+               <br />
+               <a name="review_rio_receiver"><a href="http://www.mock.com/receiver/"><b>Rio Reciever</b></a></a>: This little device is a hacker's dream.  It plays audio over a network (Ethernet or HPNA) so it requires a PC to serve audio files.  There are several open source clients available and since it boots its Linux distro over NFS you can write your own client.  They're not made anymore but you can still find them on ebay.  The main downsides: 1) small, hard-to-read LCD display; 2) FLAC support is only in third-party clients which take some work to set up.<br />
+               <br />
                <a name="review_squeezebox2"><a href="http://www.slimdevices.com/"><b>Squeezebox2</b></a></a>: A fantastic networked audio player.  Has an excellent, easy-to-read vacuum fluorescent display, wired or wireless networking, optical and coax digital outs and analog out, a reputation for very high audio quality, multi-room synchronization, and a bunch of other features.  The server-side software, SlimServer, is open-source, runs on Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, etc. and has an active community.  FLAC support is excellent; nearly the full <a href="format.html#subset">subset</a> (e.g. sample rates up to 48kHz, 16- and 24-bits per sample) including all standard encoding modes are supported.  Also supported are FLAC tags, automatic transcoding on the server of many audio formats to FLAC for transmission to the box, and external cuesheet support (internal cuesheet support is in the works).
        </div>
        <div class="box_footer"></div>